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Curtis Hanson

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2002 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
How angry is Eminem, the brooding dark prince of perpetually aggrieved sensitivity? Let us count the ways. Angry enough to sell 30 million albums, a record for rap. Angry enough to outrage guardians of public decency and allow every disaffected teenager in America to slipstream on his inextinguishable hostility.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
The new film "Chasing Mavericks" might never have happened if it weren't for a chance encounter between Jim Meenaghan and young surf legend Jay Moriarity at a Santa Cruz surf shop in 1994. When Meenaghan, a corporate lawyer and rookie surfer, and his wife met the 16-year-old Moriarity, who was revered in Santa Cruz after conquering the mythic surf of nearby Mavericks, which often boasts 60-foot swells, they understood the town's adoration. "People always said he had a glow about him. We realized we were talking to someone who radiated a little bit," Meenaghan reflected recently.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2001 | JUDY HEVRDEJS, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
This is the season for Academy Award predictions, with a string of film-critic groups kicking off the race for the gold statue by announcing their picks. And, it's the season for Curtis Hanson, who directed the much-nominated "L.A. Confidential" and this season's contender, "Wonder Boys," to take all the Oscar prognosticating with a grain of salt and shot of wry.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Too Big to Fail," which premieres Monday on HBO, is the latest of that network's high-toned original films ("Recount," "The Late Shift," "From the Earth to the Moon," the upcoming "Game Change") in which a large cast of medium-big-to-big-named actors assume the skin of the real people to put you backstage at history. In this case — the story of the 2008 financial meltdown and the attempt to keep us all from ruin — the paint is barely dry on the actual events. Indeed, their ongoing consequences will affect the next election.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ, Bill Desowitz is a regular contributor to Calendar
Curtis Hanson and Michael Douglas know all about being wonder boys--and age has nothing to do with it. Which partly explains why writer-director Hanson, 54, took everyone by surprise three years ago with the critically acclaimed and Oscar-winning police thriller "L.A. Confidential," displaying a craftsmanship brimming with dramatic intensity and social relevance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Laurie Werner, Laurie Werner is a free-lance writer based in New York.
When Meryl Streep was announced as the star of "The River Wild," the suspense-adventure film opening Friday, some Hollywood insiders were surprised. Why would this formidable actress, two-time Oscar winner and master of a million accents want to do a mere action flick in which the extent of the drama seemed to be shooting the toughest rapids in the West?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1994
Wilbur Hale (Bill) Hanson, a teacher who spent more than three decades educating San Fernando Valley children and a founder of the West Valley YMCA, has died at his Tarzana home. He was 76. A Tarzana resident for more than 40 years, Hanson died Saturday in his sleep after several months of declining health, said his son, film director Curtis Hanson. Born in Chicago, Hanson traveled with his family to California as a child to escape a flu epidemic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1997 | SCOTT HARRIS
Three months and a week have now passed since I found myself sitting inside a Tarzana living room as the guest of an extraordinary group of women, all but one in their 70s. They had been meeting regularly for 43 years, sharing friendship and a thirst for philosophy, literature, art and history. The Culture Club, they called themselves. "The leader of the pack," they agreed, was 76-year-old founding member Beverly June Hanson--better known as B.J. This was her home.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2005 | Geoff Boucher
50 CENT is about to walk a mile -- or is it eight? -- in the shoes of his mentor, Eminem. The rapper with the monetary moniker is both the star and the story of "Get Rich or Die Tryin'," which opens Wednesday, and he doesn't mind comparisons to "8 Mile," the 2002 film that put Eminem in theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
A slow journey into the deepest heart of the smart-versus-pretty conundrum, Curtis Hanson's "In Her Shoes" explores the benighted bond between a frumpish workaholic lawyer named Rose Feller (Toni Collette) and her beautiful, reckless sex monkey of a sister, Maggie (Cameron Diaz). With nothing in common but their shoe size and low self-esteem, the sisters must break apart to come together again, redeemed by the love of a good man and a wise grandmother.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Samuel Fuller was a director with a signature style: blunt verging on brutal, partial to shock cuts and mega close-ups. As a screenwriter, this former crime reporter was no less distinctive, favoring hot-button issues and hard-boiled repartee. A superb new seven-disc set, "The Samuel Fuller Collection" ($79.95, Sony, out Tuesday), which contains two films written and directed by Fuller and five earlier efforts on which he has a writing or story credit, is an intriguing auteurist study that shows the Fuller personality both as the driving force of a film and as an (often powerful)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2005 | Geoff Boucher
50 CENT is about to walk a mile -- or is it eight? -- in the shoes of his mentor, Eminem. The rapper with the monetary moniker is both the star and the story of "Get Rich or Die Tryin'," which opens Wednesday, and he doesn't mind comparisons to "8 Mile," the 2002 film that put Eminem in theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
A slow journey into the deepest heart of the smart-versus-pretty conundrum, Curtis Hanson's "In Her Shoes" explores the benighted bond between a frumpish workaholic lawyer named Rose Feller (Toni Collette) and her beautiful, reckless sex monkey of a sister, Maggie (Cameron Diaz). With nothing in common but their shoe size and low self-esteem, the sisters must break apart to come together again, redeemed by the love of a good man and a wise grandmother.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
WHEN Oscar-winning writer-director Curtis Hanson approaches filmmakers and actors to participate in his series "The Movie That Inspired Me," he gives them specific instructions -- they shouldn't pick what they consider the best movie ever made or even their favorite flick but a film that made an indelible impact on them sometime during their life. Over the past six years, Hanson ("L.A. Confidential," "8 Mile") has been surprised by some of the choices.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2002 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
How angry is Eminem, the brooding dark prince of perpetually aggrieved sensitivity? Let us count the ways. Angry enough to sell 30 million albums, a record for rap. Angry enough to outrage guardians of public decency and allow every disaffected teenager in America to slipstream on his inextinguishable hostility.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2001 | MICHAEL SRAGOW, BALTIMORE SUN
One of the few glories of the year 2000 in movies was the scruffy perfection of Curtis Hanson's "Wonder Boys," a poignant comedy about Pittsburgh-based writers and academics--notably novelist and creative writing professor Grady Tripp (Michael Douglas) and his protege, James Leer (Tobey Maguire)--who stumble toward the instincts that will set them free.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
WHEN Oscar-winning writer-director Curtis Hanson approaches filmmakers and actors to participate in his series "The Movie That Inspired Me," he gives them specific instructions -- they shouldn't pick what they consider the best movie ever made or even their favorite flick but a film that made an indelible impact on them sometime during their life. Over the past six years, Hanson ("L.A. Confidential," "8 Mile") has been surprised by some of the choices.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | CLIFF ROTHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anyone expecting fireworks as the five Directors Guild of America Award nominees--two of whom were shut out of the Oscar nominations--shared a stage for a three-hour symposium Saturday morning would have been sorely disappointed. The five pros, in a mostly low-key manner, answered questions about their films and working styles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2001 | JUDY HEVRDEJS, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
This is the season for Academy Award predictions, with a string of film-critic groups kicking off the race for the gold statue by announcing their picks. And, it's the season for Curtis Hanson, who directed the much-nominated "L.A. Confidential" and this season's contender, "Wonder Boys," to take all the Oscar prognosticating with a grain of salt and shot of wry.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ, Bill Desowitz is a regular contributor to Calendar
Curtis Hanson and Michael Douglas know all about being wonder boys--and age has nothing to do with it. Which partly explains why writer-director Hanson, 54, took everyone by surprise three years ago with the critically acclaimed and Oscar-winning police thriller "L.A. Confidential," displaying a craftsmanship brimming with dramatic intensity and social relevance.
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