Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCustomer Data
IN THE NEWS

Customer Data

BUSINESS
January 26, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Ameriprise Financial Inc., the former brokerage unit of American Express Co., said a company laptop computer that contained information on about 158,000 customers had been stolen. There haven't been any reports of misuse of the lost data, Minneapolis-based Ameriprise said Wednesday. The laptop was stolen from a locked car that belonged to an employee, and the incident was a "random criminal act," Ameriprise said.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 28, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Marriott International Inc. said its time-share unit lost backup computer tapes containing data on 206,000 employees, time-share owners and customers. Marriott said its Vacation Club International unit was investigating how the tapes disappeared from its Orlando, Fla., corporate office. Marriott said it mailed notification letters to customers and employees.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2005 | From Associated Press
More than 100,000 customers of Wachovia Corp. and Bank of America Corp. have been notified that their financial records may have been stolen by bank employees and sold to collection agencies. In all, nearly 700,000 customers of four banks may be affected, according to police in Hackensack, N.J., where the investigation was centered. None of the affected account holders are believed to live in California.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
More than 100,000 customers of a shoe store chain probably have been affected by a cyber break-in of the company's database, the Secret Service said Thursday. Columbus, Ohio-based DSW Shoe Warehouse discovered the theft of credit card and personal shopping information March 4 and reported it to federal authorities, the firm said. DSW was alerted by a credit card company that noticed suspicious activity.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2004 | Dawn Wotapka, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Trade Commission has ordered the company known for its Hooked on Phonics program to give up the money it earned by surreptitiously disclosing personal information about its customers, the agency said Wednesday. Gateway Learning Corp. of Santa Ana agreed to pay $4,608, the FTC said. The company also agreed not to share consumer data without consent and not to retroactively change its privacy policy without alerting customers.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Northwest Airlines provided information on millions of passengers for a secret U.S. government air-security project soon after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, raising more concerns among some privacy advocates about the airlines' use of confidential customer data. The nation's fourth-largest airline said in September that it "did not provide that type of information to anyone."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2003 | Carl Ingram, Times Staff Writer
The Senate on Tuesday gave final legislative approval to a compromise bill that would prohibit banks and other businesses from selling a customer's most intimate financial information without permission. Gov. Gray Davis pledged to quickly sign it into law. The 31-6 vote came without debate and capped a four-year campaign by Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2003 | Carl Ingram, Times Staff Writer
A bill that would prohibit banks, insurance companies and other financial businesses from providing personal information about their customers to telemarketers and other third parties was launched in the state Senate on Tuesday. The bill is a scaled-back version of more aggressive privacy plans that had been torpedoed over the last two years by some of the nation's most influential businesses.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2002 | Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writer
You might not peg La Playa Market, a cramped Inglewood bodega with a single checkout lane, as an early adopter of technology. But the store was among the first in the nation to install a groundbreaking and controversial personal-identification system that uses unique physical characteristics such as an individual's fingerprint to identify customers and crack down on check-cashing fraud.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
A former congressman and South Carolina's lieutenant governor advanced to a runoff for the state's Republican gubernatorial nomination Tuesday, while North Dakota residents rejected a landmark ballot issue on financial privacy. Congressional primaries were also decided in Maine and South Carolina, as was the GOP gubernatorial primary in Maine. Former Rep. Mark Sanford and Lt. Gov.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|