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BUSINESS
March 21, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Lululemon Athletica's recall of its too-sheer black yoga pants will cause trouble far into next year, the company said Thursday as it reported fourth-quarter and full-year fiscal earnings. Already, the issue -- dubbed “Pantsgate” by some on social media --  is inflaming customers claiming to have been mistreated by company associates while trying to return pants without enough rear-end coverage. Lululemon Addict, a fan site for the brand , posted tales this week of Lululemon sales associates demanding that customers put on the pants and then bend over to determine whether the clothing was see-through enough to warrant a refund.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | David Lazarus
As far as corporate notices go, they don't get much creepier than this recent alert from Verizon Wireless. The company says it's "enhancing" its Relevant Mobile Advertising program, which it uses to collect data on customers' online habits so that marketers can pitch stuff at them with greater precision. "In addition to the customer information that's currently part of the program, we will soon use an anonymous, unique identifier we create when you register on our websites," Verizon Wireless is telling customers.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
Here's how to make a $455-million consumer class-action settlement disappear. First, require the aggrieved customers to sign and mail in a claim form comprising 10 pages of legal Esperanto before receiving any money. Make sure the customers know they're signing "under penalty of perjury. " Second, let the company keep any money that isn't paid out. At least, that's how the huge settlement reached in a case involving Farmers Insurance Group works out, in the opinion of Santa Monica-based Consumer Watchdog.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez and Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Some taxpayers splurge on big-screen televisions or pay off their credit cards with their tax refund, while others, like Brandon Frank, count on it to pay rent. The 25-year-old former construction worker from Michigan and father of three may have to wait as long as six weeks before he sees his refund, because of a filing error by H&R Block. "I was counting on it for rent," said Frank, who's been unemployed since October and is attending college. "I'm probably going to have to go to one of the cash-advance places, because the money I was expecting isn't there.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2011 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: How do I get customers for my new security business? Answer: Attracting early clients is tough for any business without a track record, particularly one in the security industry. You must persuade customers to trust your integrity and your ability to deliver on the contract you sign with them. Look for early customers within your business and social circles, where people already know and presumably trust you. Offer discounts to your first customers and ask them to write testimonials for you and send referrals your way. "Target your marketing to customers that you feel would have the greatest interest in your new approach based upon the research you should have done before launching your business," said Robert M. Donnelly, an entrepreneurship professor at St. Peter's College in New Jersey.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1986
Quotron Systems Chairman Milton E. Mohr said several customers and joint-venture partners, including AT&T, have voiced concerns about Citicorp gaining access to their confidential business plans if the banking firm acquires Quotron. Mohr said, however, that he doesn't know if any customers will withdraw their business if Citicorp's $680-million bid succeeds.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2000
I cannot believe what Adelphia Cable has recently forced upon us: digital TV ["Adelphia Sending L.A. Cable Customers a Digital Warning," Nov. 17]. My neighbors and I are in an uproar over the fact that we were not given any choice as to whether or not we want to keep the cable we have, or have a box installed, get 200 channels (150 too many) free for a month, then call and tell them whether to keep our original channels or not. The caveat is, if you don't call within the month, you'll automatically be charged $74.50 per month, so be on the alert in December.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | SOPHIA WYATT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Sophia Wyatt is a British journalist based in Santa Monica and a longtime customer of Henshey's
Stores come and go. So what is so special about Henshey's? A survey of people on both sides of the counter provides some answers. "Henshey's is such a nice place to work--comfortable," said Marianne Booth, who started in gift-wrapping 26 years ago and has since graduated to accounts payable. "In other stores you are lucky if you can find a salesperson, but here there's a special camaraderie with everyone--staff and customers.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
It's a perk wireless customers have come to expect: Sign up for a two-year service contract, and get a new smartphone at a deeply discounted price or sometimes even free. But the reign of cellphone subsidies could be ending as customers demand more flexible mobile plans, forcing wireless carriers to look for alternatives to the long-standing practice. AT&T Inc. hinted this month that it was considering doing away with phone subsidies. Chief Executive Randall Stephenson said subsidizing a smartphone every two years was an expensive undertaking that he didn't think the company could afford.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
A San Francisco-based online ticketing service that handles sales for hundreds of theaters, concert halls and sports venues nationwide says its records were hacked this spring and that customers should watch their billing statements to make sure intruders haven't rung up fraudulent purchases on their credit cards. Among the clients of the targeted vendor, Vendini, are the Soka Performing Arts Center and Irvine Barclay Theatre in Orange County. The Soka Center's general manager, David Palmer, emailed an apology and an explanation to its patrons this week.
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