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OPINION
June 28, 1998
In his June 23 letter, California Youth Authority Director Francisco J. Alarcon states that CYA takes kids and turns their lives around. That's certainly what I was told. Instead, after my son received a traumatic brain injury in a fight, he lay in bed, dying, for 7 1/2 hours, without seeing a doctor or being taken to an emergency room. So I guess I'll never know what the outcome could have been if they'd had competent medical staff. Juveniles fail at prior levels because there is little commitment to providing adequate staff for supervision, nor funding for programs such as intense drug and alcohol rehabilitation.
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NEWS
May 12, 2012 | By Robert Greene
So what's the deal with Carmen Trutanich, anyway? Is he the goofy but dangerous loose cannon, power-hungry crazy man that so many former supporters love to hate? Or is he the reform-oriented outsider who, in his own description, made a few high-profile missteps in his first few months because he was unfamiliar with the culture of City Hall, and then settled down to be a solid administrator of an office that dispenses sound advice to city leaders and prosecutes dangerous criminals and nuisance violators?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999
The state should expand its investigation into alleged abuses by guards at California Youth Authority institutions and take swift action to reform the agency, a group of civil rights activists and parents of CYA inmates said Thursday. Earl Ofari Hutchinson, director of the National Alliance for Positive Action, commended Gov. Gray Davis, whose inspector general uncovered the alleged pattern of abuse, including the use of excessive force against inmates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2007 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
A 15-year-old boy who killed another teenager with a baseball bat two years ago was ordered Thursday to serve up to 11 years at the California Youth Authority. The boy was 13 when he struck 15-year-old Jeremy Rourke with a bat after a Pony League baseball game in Palmdale on April 12, 2005. Witnesses said the boy swung twice, first at Rourke's legs, then at his head. Rourke was pronounced dead at a hospital that night.
NEWS
October 9, 1989
A 14-year-old Oroville girl was sentenced to life imprisonment for her part in the beating, burning and torture of a 2 1/2-year-old girl. However Butte County Superior Court Judge Steven McNelis remanded the girl to the custody of the California Youth Authority, which cannot hold her beyond the age of 25. McNelis said the amount of time she actually serves will depend on her behavior. Sentencing of the girl, whose name was withheld because of her age, followed her conviction in Juvenile Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1992 | COLLIN NASH
A 17-year-old Fillmore youth who fatally stabbed a Moorpark man in a dispute over a case of beer will be incarcerated at the California Youth Authority facility, a judge has ruled. The youth, who attended Moorpark Community High School, pleaded guilty Dec. 17 to involuntary manslaughter, admitting that he stabbed Francisco Andrade, 25, during a fight Nov. 23, said Ventura County Deputy Dist. Atty. James D. Ellison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2003 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual action, former Santa Barbara County Sheriff James Thomas intervened on behalf of a convicted killer and helped persuade a judge Tuesday to send him to a juvenile facility rather than state prison. Thomas, in a letter to Santa Barbara County Superior Court Judge William L. Gordon, said he was a close friend of the father of the defendant, Graham Pressley, 19, who was 17 when he dug the grave for a boy slain in a bid to collect on a drug debt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | TRACY WILSON and FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Alarmed by the California Youth Authority's possible interest in building a juvenile prison north of the city, Moorpark Mayor Pat Hunter said Wednesday he would ask the City Council to oppose the idea. The Youth Authority's director recently sent a letter to the city manager indicating his agency is interested in identifying sites for facilities and would like to examine a 90-acre parcel in the Hidden Creek Ranch area. State officials who plan to visit the site in the coming weeks are not likely to get a warm reception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1998
Your June 13 article on the Arizona Boys Ranch quoted one probation officer as saying that juveniles sent to the California Youth Authority are "learning how to be a criminal. No matter what happened at the Boys Ranch, the fact is that kids stand a better chance to get their stuff together there than at the CYA." CYA takes juveniles who have failed at every level of the criminal justice system, including the Arizona Boys Ranch, and we succeed in turning more than half of these youths away from crime.
OPINION
August 23, 1998
I just read Bob Pool's excellent Aug. 14 article about drama students who started a theater company, arranged financing, put on successful plays and donated the money to their school--only to have the L.A. County High School for the Arts administrators bawl them out. Instead of teaching theater, the administrators are teaching bureaucracy and the CYA attitude that destroys innovation. Shame on them. As for the students, the show must go on! TOM HARRISON, Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
A 13-year-old Palmdale Pony League pitcher convicted of murdering a 15-year-old with a baseball bat was sentenced Thursday to confinement at the California Youth Authority until the age of 25. The boy, who was not identified because of his age, clubbed Jeremy Rourke in the head after the older boy, a friend of the family, teased him for losing a game. The 13-year-old could be released at the discretion of youth prison authorities before his 12-year term is completed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2005 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
The state prison housing some of California's most difficult young felons is a dangerous place that fails to provide the education, counseling and other help inmates need to straighten out their lives, the state's Office of the Inspector General said Tuesday. In echoing earlier criticism of the California Youth Authority, the audit provides a unique window on a single prison and underscores the breadth of problems -- from faulty fences to negligent care -- faced by the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2005 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of the union that represents state correctional officers Monday endorsed the new, more therapeutic approach planned for California's youth prison system, but said they doubted that it would become a reality. Mike Jimenez, president of the California Correctional Peace Officers Assn., said the Schwarzenegger administration's model for reform of the juvenile prisons was "a good target" and would make life safer for the 2,800 officers and counselors who are union members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2005 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
The Schwarzenegger administration is poised to profoundly transform how California treats its most troubled young lawbreakers, replacing a prison culture of punishment and control with one anchored in group therapy, self-discipline and preparation for life outside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2005 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Efforts to fix California's scandal-plagued youth prison system will flop unless the state stops housing young lawbreakers in remote "warehouses" and instead puts them in small living centers close to their homes, according to a report delivered Thursday to the Schwarzenegger administration. State officials said that they endorsed housing offenders in small groups, but that money to do so was unavailable.
OPINION
February 3, 2005
Re "For Young Offenders, a Softer Approach," Feb. 1: As the executive director of one of the oldest private nonprofit juvenile justice agencies in California, I am delighted to hear of the intended reforms that our governor plans to initiate in the California Youth Authority. Despite the critics, the private sector has demonstrated that treatment of juvenile offenders is a much better alternative to incarceration. I would suggest that the CYA use the expertise of private agencies to train its staff to help with this badly needed transition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1994 | BARBARA MURPHY
A Fillmore teen-ager who pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter in the stabbing death of a man almost a year ago was sentenced Friday to seven years in custody of the California Youth Authority. Over the objection of the prosecutor, Superior Court Judge Allan L. Steele decided to send Armando Murillo to a juvenile facility instead of state prison, defense attorney James M. Farley said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | DAWN HOBBS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
State officials have concluded their investigation of an alleged sexual assault at the troubled Ventura School, but their recommendations came under fire Thursday as "too skimpy and too simplistic" by a legislator charged with overseeing the juvenile correctional facility. State Sen. Ruben Ayala (D-Chino) said he plans today to ask Lloyd Woods, inspector general of the state Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, to rewrite the recommendations so they are more specific and instructional.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2004 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Don't be fooled by the fuzzy old mutt dozing peacefully on Donna Brorby's lap. Tough and relentless, Brorby spent more than 20 years -- the bulk of her life as a lawyer -- forcing Texas to clean up its notorious prisons. Death threats, stubborn wardens, hostile politicians, witnesses willing to lie for their beloved correctional system -- such were the obstacles Brorby faced as counsel for Texas inmates in the nation's longest-running civil rights case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2004 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Several guards at the California Youth Authority's Ventura School have been accused of improper sexual conduct with female wards at the Camarillo facility and are the subject of an internal investigation, agency officials and the father of an alleged victim said Wednesday. A 20-year-old Yorba Linda woman alleges that as many as a dozen staff members coerced sex from seven wards in exchange for jewelry, gifts, extra food and privileges in the last two years.
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