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Cyber Intelligence Sharing And Protection Act

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BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - The escalating cyber attacks on corporate and government computers have provided a rare opportunity for bipartisan legislation to address the problem. But rather than sailing through Congress, the latest cyber security legislation is exposing a fault line in the tech industry. On one side stand some of tech's biggest companies, such as Intel Corp., Oracle Corp. and IBM Corp., which are pressing for more government action. On the other side are thousands of smaller tech firms and privacy activists who have launched online protests to raise the alarm over a bill they say harms privacy and civil liberties.
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - The escalating cyber attacks on corporate and government computers have provided a rare opportunity for bipartisan legislation to address the problem. But rather than sailing through Congress, the latest cyber security legislation is exposing a fault line in the tech industry. On one side stand some of tech's biggest companies, such as Intel Corp., Oracle Corp. and IBM Corp., which are pressing for more government action. On the other side are thousands of smaller tech firms and privacy activists who have launched online protests to raise the alarm over a bill they say harms privacy and civil liberties.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
The House of Representatives passed a controversial cybersecurity bill as expected on Thursday, moving toward a possible confrontation with the Senate and White House . The  Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2013 , or CISPA, passed by a vote of 288 to 127, with 17 abstentions. The bill makes it easier for companies to share information with other companies and the government about cyber attacks. Large tech companies pushed hard for the legislation amid escalating cyber attacks, calling it a necessary step to shore up their defenses.  MORE: Cybersecurity bill pits tech giants against privacy activists The companies threw their lobbyists and pocketbooks behind the bill, according to an analysis by the Sunlight Foundation : " Sunlight's review of lobbying disclosures from the last session of Congress in  Influence Explorer shows that backers of the  Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act  had $605 million in lobbying expenditures from 2011 through the third quarter of last year compared to $4.3 million spent by opponents of the bill.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Well, so much for CISPA.  Not long after the House passed the controversial  Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2013 , the Senate has indicated it has no plans to consider the bill.  Citing sources on various committees, several organizations reported late last week that the Senate would not even give the bill a look. While the Senate may introduce a different information-sharing bill at some point, it appears the House version is DOA.  "I think it's dead for now," Michelle Richardson, legislative counsel with the ACLU, told U.S. News & World Report . "CISPA is too controversial, it's too expansive, it's just not the same sort of program contemplated by the Senate last year.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
The Obama administration issued a statement Thursday that indicated it's not likely to support a cybersecurity bill approved by the U.S. House Intelligence Committee this week. While stopping short of an outright veto threat that many privacy activists may have wanted, the statement made clear that the administration does not believe the bill in its current form does enough to safeguard personal information. PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013    "We continue to believe that information sharing improvements are essential to effective legislation, but they must include privacy and civil liberties protections, reinforce the roles of civilian and intelligence agencies, and include targeted liability protections," Caitlin Hayden, a National Security Council spokeswoman, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- It's legislative spring-cleaning time in Congress, where lawmakers are engaged in a busy week of should-pass legislation as both parties seek to tally accomplishments before taking a break to campaign during the upcoming recess. The Senate is closing in on passage of a long-debated overhaul to the Postal Service that would save Saturday delivery and make it more difficult for the government to close rural post offices. The postal bill still faces dozens of possible amendments, including one from Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.)
BUSINESS
April 16, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
President Obama threatened on Tuesday to veto a major cyber security bill unless Congress amends it to include more protections for privacy and civil liberties. The veto threat comes just a day before a possible vote in Congress on t he  Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act  of 2013, or  CISPA . The bill aims to make it easier for companies to share information about cyber attacks with other companies and the government.  PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013    While large tech companies have been pushing for the legislation amid escalating attacks on computer networks, privacy activists have been campaigning against it, contending it absolves companies of too much legal liability while failing to offer safeguards that protect personal information.  After the bill passed the House Intelligence Committee last week, the Obama administration signaled that it had concerns about the bill , but stopped short of issuing an outright veto threat.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Add cyber-security to the list of tough problems Washington can't agree on how to tackle. A bipartisan bill whose chief sponsors are the chairman and ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee has run into trouble, including opposition from leading privacy groups and the White House. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, introduced by Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and Rep.C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.), passed the Republican-controlled House on Thursday night.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Leaders of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence pledged Tuesday to amend their cybersecurity bill, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act , to address the main concerns raised by civil libertarians and privacy advocates. The revisions are clear improvements, and they show that the committee is trying hard to limit the measure's scope. Nevertheless, the bill still has a fundamental problem : By encouraging network operators to share information with the government about what their customers do online, it threatens to turn ISPs and online service providers into snoops.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- The plan was for the debate on the controversial Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act to take place on Thursday, with the vote the next day. As it turns out, the legislation came to a surprising vote after the debate tonight, eventually passing in the House by a vote of 248-168. The bill's passage, despite a veto threat from the White House Wednesday, now places the responsibility in the lap of the Senate, which has its own cybersecurity legislation in the works.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
The U.S. House Intelligence Committee overwhelmingly passed a cyber-security bill on Wednesday, angering privacy advocates who believe the bill fails to protect critical personal information.  The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2013 , or CISPA, passed by a vote of 18 to 2, with only two Democrats voting against it. It now will move to the full U.S. House of Representatives for a vote that could be held as early as next week....
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