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Cyber Security

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BUSINESS
October 26, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
In a recent speech to business leaders, U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta revealed for the first time how a virus wiped data from more than 30,000 oil company computers in Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Panetta said the "Shamoon" virus was probably the most destructive attack the business sector has experienced. All of the computers were rendered useless and had to be replaced. The virus replaced crucial system files with a burning American flag and rewrote all the data on the machines.
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OPINION
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Hart and Norman Augustine
In February 2001, a bipartisan federal commission on which we served warned that terrorists would acquire weapons of mass destruction and mass disruption. "Attacks against American citizens on American soil, possibly causing heavy casualties, are likely over the next quarter-century," the Hart-Rudman Commission said. "In the face of this threat, our nation has no coherent or integrated governmental structures. " We added: "Congress should rationalize its current committee structure so that it best serves U.S. national security objectives.
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NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- The White House's threat to veto the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act is prompting more amendments from its supporters as the bill heads toward a planned House vote on Friday. President Obama's senior advisors will recommend he veto the bill if it passes Congress in its current form, the administration said on Wednesday, pointing out that the bill goes too far in releasing companies from liability if their computer networks are not secure and does not include enough oversight to limit how information gathered by the government can be shared.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2014 | Ken Dilanian
Early last year, as Edward Snowden was preparing to disclose classified documents he had purloined from National Security Agency computers in Hawaii, the NSA director, Gen. Keith Alexander, was gearing up to sell Congress and the public on a proposal for the NSA to defend private U.S. computer networks against cyber attacks. Alexander wanted to use the NSA's powerful tools to scan Internet traffic for malicious software code. He said the NSA could kill the viruses and other digital threats without reading consumers' private emails, texts and Web searches.
OPINION
April 24, 2012
The engineers who designed the Internet focused on connection and communication, not safety and security. That's one reason hackers have been able to take surreptitious control of Internet-connected devices, cripple websites and steal valuable data. Now, lawmakers are considering whether to vastly expand the government's role in protecting Internet services and corporate computer networks against cyber attack. But while the online security threats are serious, encouraging private industry to funnel information to the government poses its own set of problems.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON - President Obama issued a proclamation Monday making October National Cyber Security Awareness Month. But with cyber security proposals stuck in Congress, the Obama administration is moving to do more than create an awareness month. The White House, as first reported by the Associated Press , began to draft an executive order after the shutdown of the Obama-approved Cyber Security Act of 2012 in the Senate in August . “We are very cognizant that in some industries there exist already regulatory authorities that can be used for cyber security,” Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said at the National Journal's Cyber Security Summit.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
The White House has just sent to Capitol Hill a proposal to beef up cyber security regulations, an attempt to forge consensus on how to protect vulnerable U.S. networks from attacks that could blow up city blocks, erase bank data, crash planes and cut power to large sections of the country. One key provision would require electric utilities and others to disclose what steps they are taking to protect their networks, an attempt to use the market to force companies to beef up protections.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- Despite warnings from intelligence officials that the U.S. is ill-prepared to stop a growing wave of cyber attacks against its crucial national infrastructure, the Senate on Thursday failed to pass a watered-down bill that would have set voluntary standards to harden the network defenses of electric utilities, chemical plants and other privately owned facilities. Most Republicans and a few Democrats voted to block the measure even after its sponsors agreed to scale back its regulatory mandates.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2009 | Associated Press
The head of the nation's cyber security center has resigned amid persistent turf battles and confusion over the control and protection of the country's vast computer networks and systems. Rod Beckstrom's decision to step down as director of the National Cyber Security Center comes as the White House is conducting a broad 60-day review of how well the government is using technology to protect everything from classified national security data to key financial systems and air traffic control.
WORLD
June 7, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. -- President Obama said late Friday that he pressed Chinese President Xi Jinping on the issue of cyber security during their initial discussions at a two-day summit and suggested they work together to prevent computer hacking, no matter who the victim may be. Speaking with reporters after an evening session, both leaders said they considered cyber security a serious problem, without blaming either of their countries for perpetrating...
OPINION
January 22, 2014 | By P.W. Singer
A recent Pew poll found that Americans are more afraid of a cyber attack than they are of Iranian nuclear weapons, the rise of China or climate change. Such fears are not only out of proportion to risk; if they take hold, they could threaten the positive gains of the digital age. Certainly there are growing threats in the cyber world, and the stakes are high. But there is also a high level of misinformation and plain old ignorance driving the fear. Despite the Internet now enabling us to run down the answers to almost any question, a number of myths have emerged about online security and what it means for us offline.
AUTOS
January 2, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
Self-driving cars aren't expected to begin hitting the road until 2020, but a new study predicts that once they're here, they will quickly become a common sight. By 2035, nearly 54 million autonomous vehicles will be in consumers' driveways worldwide and annual sales of the vehicles will reach almost 12 million, according to the study by IHS Automotive. After 2050, the study predicts that nearly all of the vehicles in use -- both personal and commercial -- will be self-driving. One of the biggest impacts from such widespread use of self-driving cars (SDCs)
BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Big U.S. banks have learned to play nice, at least when it comes to cybersecurity. Last year, when hackers bombarded, and in some cases hobbled, banks' websites, the FBI met with representatives to discuss the attacks. Bank officials initially were reluctant to share much information, however, according to Joseph Demarest, assistant director in the FBI's cyberdivision. “It was stilted,” Demarest said at a cybersecurity conference in New York on Tuesday. “Folks were rather protective,” he added, and “wouldn't share in an environment with their competitors sitting in the same room.” Months later, Demarest said, the large financial institutions began sharing more information about attacks with the government and each other.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Two hackers from Irvine gained access in April to the air conditioning and water systems of a Google Inc. office in Sydney, Australia. Because Google had failed to install a security patch to a software program that remotely tracks and controls building systems, the hackers could have easily raised the office's temperature to an unbearable level or caused water pipes to burst by increasing pressure. Luckily for Google, the hackers were working for Cylance Inc., an Irvine company that has been grabbing headlines for uncovering security holes that could allow malicious hackers to do serious damage to crucial infrastructure such as hospitals, oil pipelines and banking systems.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The U.S. reached agreement with China to cooperate on improving investments and climate change, among other areas, but officials could cite little concrete progress on a White House priority: getting the Chinese to stop cyber-theft of American technologies and trade secrets. As China and the U.S. concluded their fifth annual Strategic and Economic Dialogue on Thursday, officials on both sides described the overall tenor of the two-day discussions as candid and constructive.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. and China opened annual high-level talks on Wednesday, with both sides calling for greater mutual trust amid bilateral strains over cyber spying and security threats in northeast Asia.  The meetings, held at the State and Treasury departments in Washington, are intended to bring together Cabinet-level officials to enhance dialogue on potential cooperation in a wide range of security and economic areas, as well as on the...
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
In case corporate America didn't fully understand the seriousness of the country's growing cyber threat, President Obama chose a dramatic venue for his meeting Wednesday afternoon with chief executives: the White House's Situation Room. The White House wouldn't say who would be meeting with the president until after the event, but JPMorgan Chase & Co. confirmed that  Jamie Dimon , its chairman and CEO, would attend in the wake of a wave of attacks on the bank by hackers. The so-called denial-of-service attacks, which overwhelm websites with phony requests, prevented Chase customers from accessing their online banking accounts.
WORLD
June 7, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
RANCHO MIRAGE  - The United States and China are economic competitors who face “a whole range of challenges on which we have to cooperate,” President Obama said late Friday as he welcomed his Chinese counterpart to a two-day summit in this California desert town. “The United States welcomes the continuing peaceful rise of China as a world power,” Obama said in his opening statement, with President Xi Jinping sitting across the table from him. “In fact, it's in the United States' interest that China continues on the path to success.” Obama also alluded to an issue aides said would be high on the agenda of his meetings with Xi: alleged cyber spying by China on U.S. companies and government entities.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - America's largest commercial ports have failed to shore up defenses against potential cyber attacks, a new study contends, raising concerns about the vulnerability of computer networks that help move energy, foodstuff and other goods to market. Coast Guard Cmdr. Joseph Kramek, who spent a year as a fellow at the Brookings Institution, examined some of the nation's most heavily used ports: Los Angeles and Long Beach; Baltimore; Houston and Beaumont in Texas; and Vicksburg, Miss., on the Mississippi River.
OPINION
June 12, 2013 | By Joseph S. Nye Jr
China will almost certainly pass the United States in the total size of its economy within a decade or so. But if one looks also at military and "soft power" resources, the U.S. is likely to remain more powerful than China for at least the next few decades. Does it matter? When nations worry too much about power transitions, their leaders may overreact or follow strategies that are dangerous. As Thucydides described it, the Peloponnesian War - in which the Greek city-state system tore itself apart - was caused by the rise in the power of Athens and the fear that created in Sparta.
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