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Cyber Security

BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | Ken Dilanian
Just as U.S. companies are coming to grips with threats to their computer networks emanating from cyber spies based in China, a noted expert is highlighting what he says is an even more pernicious vulnerability in smartphones. Dmitri Alperovitch, the former McAfee Inc. cyber security researcher best known for identifying a widespread China-based cyber espionage operation dubbed Shady Rat, has used a previously unknown hole in smartphone browsers to plant China-based malware that can commandeer the device, record its calls, pinpoint its location and access user texts and emails.
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NATIONAL
February 8, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Members of the Bush family, including both former presidents, have apparently been hacked, and the Secret Service is investigating. The revelation came after Bush family photos and excerpts of email exchanges were posted online Thursday by the Smoking Gun, which attributed them to a hacker known as “Guccifer.” Guccifer claimed on the website to be a veteran hacker already being sought by “the feds” for hacking hundreds of...
OPINION
July 14, 2009 | Jesselyn Radack, Jesselyn Radack is the homeland security director of the Government Accountability Project in Washington.
Cyber security is a real issue, as evidenced by the virus behind July 4 cyber attacks that hobbled government and business websites in the United States and South Korea. It originated from Internet provider addresses in 16 countries and targeted, among others, the White House and the New York Stock Exchange. Unfortunately, the Obama administration has chosen to combat it in a move that runs counter to its pledge to be transparent.
OPINION
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Hart and Norman Augustine
In February 2001, a bipartisan federal commission on which we served warned that terrorists would acquire weapons of mass destruction and mass disruption. "Attacks against American citizens on American soil, possibly causing heavy casualties, are likely over the next quarter-century," the Hart-Rudman Commission said. "In the face of this threat, our nation has no coherent or integrated governmental structures. " We added: "Congress should rationalize its current committee structure so that it best serves U.S. national security objectives.
MAGAZINE
November 17, 2002 | Janet Reitman, Janet Reitman's last story for the magazine was a profile of David Rosenthal, a television writer who left Hollywood, at least temporarily, and moved to New York.
The boys who might save your life one day really love fast cars. one of them, a 24-year-old named Mark Davis, drives a turbo-powered black Ford Mustang. Earlier this year, Mark took me for a drive through Tulsa, Okla., where he lives. "Check this out," he said, as we passed a strip mall. He flipped on a Metallica CD, rolled down the windows, pumped up the volume as high as it could go, and revved his engine. A few people standing on the curb staggered back as if they'd been shot. Mark grinned.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2013 | By Paresh Dave, Los Angeles Times
Frustrated by their inability to stem an onslaught of computer hackers, some companies are considering adopting the standards of the Wild West to fight back against online bandits. In taking an eye-for-an-eye approach, some of the companies that have been attacked are looking at retaliating against the attackers, covertly shutting down computers behind the cyber assaults or even spreading a new virus to stymie the hackers. Such retaliation is illegal in the United States, but companies see it as a way to curtail the breaches, particularly if the attack is originating from another country, where the legality of retaliatory attacks is unclear.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Big U.S. banks have learned to play nice, at least when it comes to cybersecurity. Last year, when hackers bombarded, and in some cases hobbled, banks' websites, the FBI met with representatives to discuss the attacks. Bank officials initially were reluctant to share much information, however, according to Joseph Demarest, assistant director in the FBI's cyberdivision. “It was stilted,” Demarest said at a cybersecurity conference in New York on Tuesday. “Folks were rather protective,” he added, and “wouldn't share in an environment with their competitors sitting in the same room.” Months later, Demarest said, the large financial institutions began sharing more information about attacks with the government and each other.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2010 | By Bob Drogin
The crisis began when college basketball fans downloaded a free March Madness application to their smart phones. The app hid spyware that stole passwords, intercepted e-mails and created havoc. Soon 60 million cellphones were dead. The Internet crashed, finance and commerce collapsed, and most of the nation's electric grid went dark. White House aides discussed putting the Army in American cities. That, spiced up with bombs and hurricanes, formed the doomsday scenario when 10 former White House advisors and other top officials joined forces Tuesday in a rare public cyber war game designed to highlight the potential vulnerability of the nation's digital infrastructure to crippling attack.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The U.S. reached agreement with China to cooperate on improving investments and climate change, among other areas, but officials could cite little concrete progress on a White House priority: getting the Chinese to stop cyber-theft of American technologies and trade secrets. As China and the U.S. concluded their fifth annual Strategic and Economic Dialogue on Thursday, officials on both sides described the overall tenor of the two-day discussions as candid and constructive.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama issued an executive order Tuesday that seeks to shore up the nation's cyber-defenses by improving how classified information is shared between the government and the owners and operators of crucial infrastructure, including electric utilities, dams and mass transit. The long-expected order, which Obama announced in his State of the Union speech, is a stopgap measure that follows Congress' failure last year to pass legislation to create comprehensive standards for the private sector to help thwart digital attacks.
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