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Cyber Security

NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- Activists and lawmakers are geared up for a final push against the latest Internet security legislation, calling on Congress to reject or dial back the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (PDF) because of the considerable power it would give government to examine Americans' online activities. A number of amendments already have been made to the bill as its supporters have tried to secure passage - - a vote is likely on Friday - - by clearing up ambiguities regarding what the law would allow the government to do. CISPA's supporters portray it as a bill focused on opening up communication between the government and private entities for the purposes of sharing information about imminent or emerging cyber security threats, with particular emphasis on those that threaten national security from foreign sources.
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NATIONAL
October 14, 2009 | Sebastian Rotella
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano got a firsthand look Tuesday at how her agency, which defends the nation's physical borders, also guards a volatile virtual frontier: cyberspace. Napolitano visited the Cyber Crimes Center, which is operated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in a discreet office building in suburban Virginia. Known as C3, the 12-year-old unit has a staff of 35 who use their computer expertise to assist investigations of complex international crimes, especially those that victimize children.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Big U.S. banks have learned to play nice, at least when it comes to cybersecurity. Last year, when hackers bombarded, and in some cases hobbled, banks' websites, the FBI met with representatives to discuss the attacks. Bank officials initially were reluctant to share much information, however, according to Joseph Demarest, assistant director in the FBI's cyberdivision. “It was stilted,” Demarest said at a cybersecurity conference in New York on Tuesday. “Folks were rather protective,” he added, and “wouldn't share in an environment with their competitors sitting in the same room.” Months later, Demarest said, the large financial institutions began sharing more information about attacks with the government and each other.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. Just as U.S. companies are coming to grips with the threats to their computer networks emanating from cyber spies based in China, a noted expert is highlighting what he says is an even more pernicious vulnerability in smartphones. Dmitri Alperovitch, the former McAfee cyber security researcher who is best known for identifying a widespread China-based cyber espionage operation he dubbed " Shady Rat ," has used a previously unknown hole in smartphone browsers to deliver an existing piece of China-based malware that can commandeer the device, record its calls, pinpoint its location and access user texts and emails.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The U.S. reached agreement with China to cooperate on improving investments and climate change, among other areas, but officials could cite little concrete progress on a White House priority: getting the Chinese to stop cyber-theft of American technologies and trade secrets. As China and the U.S. concluded their fifth annual Strategic and Economic Dialogue on Thursday, officials on both sides described the overall tenor of the two-day discussions as candid and constructive.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | Ken Dilanian
Just as U.S. companies are coming to grips with threats to their computer networks emanating from cyber spies based in China, a noted expert is highlighting what he says is an even more pernicious vulnerability in smartphones. Dmitri Alperovitch, the former McAfee Inc. cyber security researcher best known for identifying a widespread China-based cyber espionage operation dubbed Shady Rat, has used a previously unknown hole in smartphone browsers to plant China-based malware that can commandeer the device, record its calls, pinpoint its location and access user texts and emails.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama issued an executive order Tuesday that seeks to shore up the nation's cyber-defenses by improving how classified information is shared between the government and the owners and operators of crucial infrastructure, including electric utilities, dams and mass transit. The long-expected order, which Obama announced in his State of the Union speech, is a stopgap measure that follows Congress' failure last year to pass legislation to create comprehensive standards for the private sector to help thwart digital attacks.
OPINION
July 14, 2009 | Jesselyn Radack, Jesselyn Radack is the homeland security director of the Government Accountability Project in Washington.
Cyber security is a real issue, as evidenced by the virus behind July 4 cyber attacks that hobbled government and business websites in the United States and South Korea. It originated from Internet provider addresses in 16 countries and targeted, among others, the White House and the New York Stock Exchange. Unfortunately, the Obama administration has chosen to combat it in a move that runs counter to its pledge to be transparent.
AUTOS
January 2, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
Self-driving cars aren't expected to begin hitting the road until 2020, but a new study predicts that once they're here, they will quickly become a common sight. By 2035, nearly 54 million autonomous vehicles will be in consumers' driveways worldwide and annual sales of the vehicles will reach almost 12 million, according to the study by IHS Automotive. After 2050, the study predicts that nearly all of the vehicles in use -- both personal and commercial -- will be self-driving. One of the biggest impacts from such widespread use of self-driving cars (SDCs)
OPINION
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Hart and Norman Augustine
In February 2001, a bipartisan federal commission on which we served warned that terrorists would acquire weapons of mass destruction and mass disruption. "Attacks against American citizens on American soil, possibly causing heavy casualties, are likely over the next quarter-century," the Hart-Rudman Commission said. "In the face of this threat, our nation has no coherent or integrated governmental structures. " We added: "Congress should rationalize its current committee structure so that it best serves U.S. national security objectives.
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