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Cyber Security

BUSINESS
July 10, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. and China opened annual high-level talks on Wednesday, with both sides calling for greater mutual trust amid bilateral strains over cyber spying and security threats in northeast Asia.  The meetings, held at the State and Treasury departments in Washington, are intended to bring together Cabinet-level officials to enhance dialogue on potential cooperation in a wide range of security and economic areas, as well as on the...
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WORLD
June 6, 2013 | Shashank Bengali and Ken Dilanian
In January 2010, when Google accused Chinese hackers of infiltrating its network to track emails of human rights activists, the Obama administration didn't disclose what U.S. diplomats in Beijing believed: China's Politburo had directed the attack. Today the White House no longer shies from publicly accusing Beijing of launching a sophisticated range of cyber attacks on U.S. computer networks to steal corporate and government secrets -- including those of naval propulsion systems and gas pipeline technology -- worth billions of dollars.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- Activists and lawmakers are geared up for a final push against the latest Internet security legislation, calling on Congress to reject or dial back the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (PDF) because of the considerable power it would give government to examine Americans' online activities. A number of amendments already have been made to the bill as its supporters have tried to secure passage - - a vote is likely on Friday - - by clearing up ambiguities regarding what the law would allow the government to do. CISPA's supporters portray it as a bill focused on opening up communication between the government and private entities for the purposes of sharing information about imminent or emerging cyber security threats, with particular emphasis on those that threaten national security from foreign sources.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2011 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
It took all of three minutes for the hacker to break into the small accounting firm's computer system. The virtual open window into the system turned out to be a computer equipped with outdated software. It provided access to the office network and the hacker was able to get files that included private financial information. "That was a shock," said Lynne Leavitt, a partner at the four-person Los Angeles firm, Brakensiek Leavitt Pleger. "I thought we had good security. I thought we were safe.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama issued an executive order Tuesday that seeks to shore up the nation's cyber-defenses by improving how classified information is shared between the government and the owners and operators of crucial infrastructure, including electric utilities, dams and mass transit. The long-expected order, which Obama announced in his State of the Union speech, is a stopgap measure that follows Congress' failure last year to pass legislation to create comprehensive standards for the private sector to help thwart digital attacks.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Members of the Bush family, including both former presidents, have apparently been hacked, and the Secret Service is investigating. The revelation came after Bush family photos and excerpts of email exchanges were posted online Thursday by the Smoking Gun, which attributed them to a hacker known as “Guccifer.” Guccifer claimed on the website to be a veteran hacker already being sought by “the feds” for hacking hundreds of...
MAGAZINE
November 17, 2002 | Janet Reitman, Janet Reitman's last story for the magazine was a profile of David Rosenthal, a television writer who left Hollywood, at least temporarily, and moved to New York.
The boys who might save your life one day really love fast cars. one of them, a 24-year-old named Mark Davis, drives a turbo-powered black Ford Mustang. Earlier this year, Mark took me for a drive through Tulsa, Okla., where he lives. "Check this out," he said, as we passed a strip mall. He flipped on a Metallica CD, rolled down the windows, pumped up the volume as high as it could go, and revved his engine. A few people standing on the curb staggered back as if they'd been shot. Mark grinned.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2009 | Sebastian Rotella
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano got a firsthand look Tuesday at how her agency, which defends the nation's physical borders, also guards a volatile virtual frontier: cyberspace. Napolitano visited the Cyber Crimes Center, which is operated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in a discreet office building in suburban Virginia. Known as C3, the 12-year-old unit has a staff of 35 who use their computer expertise to assist investigations of complex international crimes, especially those that victimize children.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Big U.S. banks have learned to play nice, at least when it comes to cybersecurity. Last year, when hackers bombarded, and in some cases hobbled, banks' websites, the FBI met with representatives to discuss the attacks. Bank officials initially were reluctant to share much information, however, according to Joseph Demarest, assistant director in the FBI's cyberdivision. “It was stilted,” Demarest said at a cybersecurity conference in New York on Tuesday. “Folks were rather protective,” he added, and “wouldn't share in an environment with their competitors sitting in the same room.” Months later, Demarest said, the large financial institutions began sharing more information about attacks with the government and each other.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2010 | By Bob Drogin
The crisis began when college basketball fans downloaded a free March Madness application to their smart phones. The app hid spyware that stole passwords, intercepted e-mails and created havoc. Soon 60 million cellphones were dead. The Internet crashed, finance and commerce collapsed, and most of the nation's electric grid went dark. White House aides discussed putting the Army in American cities. That, spiced up with bombs and hurricanes, formed the doomsday scenario when 10 former White House advisors and other top officials joined forces Tuesday in a rare public cyber war game designed to highlight the potential vulnerability of the nation's digital infrastructure to crippling attack.
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