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Cyber Security

NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
SAN JOSE -   President Obama plans to take up the subject of cyber security with Chinese President Xi Jinping on Friday as the two meet behind closed doors for what U.S. officials hope will be a rapport-building session between the two leaders. But the meeting unfolds in an atmosphere of newly heightened concern about the Obama administration's own policies toward the privacy of American citizens, likely to distract the public attention's from the high-stakes meeting in Southern California.
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BUSINESS
July 10, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. and China opened annual high-level talks on Wednesday, with both sides calling for greater mutual trust amid bilateral strains over cyber spying and security threats in northeast Asia.  The meetings, held at the State and Treasury departments in Washington, are intended to bring together Cabinet-level officials to enhance dialogue on potential cooperation in a wide range of security and economic areas, as well as on the...
WORLD
June 6, 2013 | Shashank Bengali and Ken Dilanian
In January 2010, when Google accused Chinese hackers of infiltrating its network to track emails of human rights activists, the Obama administration didn't disclose what U.S. diplomats in Beijing believed: China's Politburo had directed the attack. Today the White House no longer shies from publicly accusing Beijing of launching a sophisticated range of cyber attacks on U.S. computer networks to steal corporate and government secrets -- including those of naval propulsion systems and gas pipeline technology -- worth billions of dollars.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- Activists and lawmakers are geared up for a final push against the latest Internet security legislation, calling on Congress to reject or dial back the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (PDF) because of the considerable power it would give government to examine Americans' online activities. A number of amendments already have been made to the bill as its supporters have tried to secure passage - - a vote is likely on Friday - - by clearing up ambiguities regarding what the law would allow the government to do. CISPA's supporters portray it as a bill focused on opening up communication between the government and private entities for the purposes of sharing information about imminent or emerging cyber security threats, with particular emphasis on those that threaten national security from foreign sources.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Members of the Bush family, including both former presidents, have apparently been hacked, and the Secret Service is investigating. The revelation came after Bush family photos and excerpts of email exchanges were posted online Thursday by the Smoking Gun, which attributed them to a hacker known as “Guccifer.” Guccifer claimed on the website to be a veteran hacker already being sought by “the feds” for hacking hundreds of...
OPINION
June 12, 2013 | By Joseph S. Nye Jr
China will almost certainly pass the United States in the total size of its economy within a decade or so. But if one looks also at military and "soft power" resources, the U.S. is likely to remain more powerful than China for at least the next few decades. Does it matter? When nations worry too much about power transitions, their leaders may overreact or follow strategies that are dangerous. As Thucydides described it, the Peloponnesian War - in which the Greek city-state system tore itself apart - was caused by the rise in the power of Athens and the fear that created in Sparta.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Big U.S. banks have learned to play nice, at least when it comes to cybersecurity. Last year, when hackers bombarded, and in some cases hobbled, banks' websites, the FBI met with representatives to discuss the attacks. Bank officials initially were reluctant to share much information, however, according to Joseph Demarest, assistant director in the FBI's cyberdivision. “It was stilted,” Demarest said at a cybersecurity conference in New York on Tuesday. “Folks were rather protective,” he added, and “wouldn't share in an environment with their competitors sitting in the same room.” Months later, Demarest said, the large financial institutions began sharing more information about attacks with the government and each other.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard, Andrew Tangel and Jim Puzzanghera
A shadowy but well organized hacker group in the Middle East has disrupted the electronic banking operations of America's largest financial institutions in recent days, underscoring U.S. vulnerability to online terrorism. A group identifying itself as Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Cyber Fighters attacked the websites of Wells Fargo, U.S. Bancorp and Bank of America. The strikes left customers temporarily unable to access their checking accounts, mortgages and other services. The banks said account and personal information for their tens of millions of online and mobile customers were not compromised.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The U.S. reached agreement with China to cooperate on improving investments and climate change, among other areas, but officials could cite little concrete progress on a White House priority: getting the Chinese to stop cyber-theft of American technologies and trade secrets. As China and the U.S. concluded their fifth annual Strategic and Economic Dialogue on Thursday, officials on both sides described the overall tenor of the two-day discussions as candid and constructive.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. Just as U.S. companies are coming to grips with the threats to their computer networks emanating from cyber spies based in China, a noted expert is highlighting what he says is an even more pernicious vulnerability in smartphones. Dmitri Alperovitch, the former McAfee cyber security researcher who is best known for identifying a widespread China-based cyber espionage operation he dubbed " Shady Rat ," has used a previously unknown hole in smartphone browsers to deliver an existing piece of China-based malware that can commandeer the device, record its calls, pinpoint its location and access user texts and emails.
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