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NATIONAL
June 24, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Tuesday ordered the creation of a military command to oversee cyberspace in order to better defend military computer networks as well as pool capabilities for attacking the networks of other countries. For now, the U.S. Cyber Command will remain a part of the military's Strategic Command, which also oversees the nation's nuclear arsenal. But experts said the move is likely to be a precursor to setting up an independent command.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 22, 2014 | By P.W. Singer
A recent Pew poll found that Americans are more afraid of a cyber attack than they are of Iranian nuclear weapons, the rise of China or climate change. Such fears are not only out of proportion to risk; if they take hold, they could threaten the positive gains of the digital age. Certainly there are growing threats in the cyber world, and the stakes are high. But there is also a high level of misinformation and plain old ignorance driving the fear. Despite the Internet now enabling us to run down the answers to almost any question, a number of myths have emerged about online security and what it means for us offline.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 1996 | From Reuters
Afraid hotel and airline miles disappear on the way to your statements? Harris Turner, publisher of The Flyer's Edge, has a new way to keep tabs on earned points and miles. Turner's Status Web page keeps track of United Airlines and Marriott Hotels programs. Hilton Hotels, American Airlines and the American Express program will soon join, he said. For more information, access the page: http://www.status.com
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Live by the tweet, die by the Twitter sword. That's Jofi Joseph's fate. But he's not the first - and he certainly won't be the last - to perish from the wounds of 140-character cuts. Joseph, most recently a director in the nonproliferation section of the White House's national security staff, was fired after being unmasked as the lamebrain behind the Twitter handle @natsecwonk. And just what irked his bosses? Perhaps tweets like this one, saved by the website the Daily Beast, which smartly anticipated writing the tweeter's Twitter obit someday: “I'm a fan of Obama, but his continuing reliance and dependence upon a vacuous cipher like Valerie Jarrett concerns me.” “Was Huma Abedin wearing beer goggles the night she met Anthony Wiener?
BUSINESS
April 1, 1996 | GARY CHAPMAN
Shakespeare wrote, in Othello: "Who steals my purse steals trash. . . . But he that filches from me my good name robs me of that which not enriches him, and makes me poor indeed." In cyberspace, it's getting harder to hang onto one's good name. Phil Agre, a professor of communications at UC San Diego, manages an Internet listserv, or subscription e-mail service, called Red Rock Eaters.
OPINION
May 30, 2011
Egged on by French President Nicolas Sarkozy, the leaders of the Group of 8 nations announced Friday that the Internet was too important for governments to leave ungoverned. Cyberspace needs a legal framework that promotes human rights, the rule of law, privacy, security and the protection of intellectual property, they declared, and they pledged to work on one. Good luck with that. The declaration reflects the wrongheaded wish of many foreign leaders to tame the Net, particularly freewheeling Web-based businesses and online speech.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | KELLEY SHANNON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anne works at a university in Scotland. Brooke, in Los Angeles, is preparing to attend law school this fall. The two have never met face to face, but in some ways they are closer than sisters. Rape, and the filthy feeling it inflicted on them, has been their bond, the Internet their refuge. "We talk daily, Monday through Friday," Brooke says. "We are working it out together on a friend-friend basis."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1997
So the Supreme Court says it's OK to inundate kiddie cyberspace with porn--and the Los Angeles Police Department brass denies the vice squad the privilege of ogling pinups (July 2). Said brass, if it has nothing better to do, should be promoted to three-wheelers to paper felonious criminals whose parking meters have expired. ANTHONY J. BRADISSE Los Angeles
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | Jeff Meyers, Jeff Meyers is editor of Ventura County Life
I'm writing this in the office, using an IBM 286 with hard-drive and a single floppy. I have access to all the knowledge accumulated in The Times since 1985. I can also link up with the Internet. Whoopee. Pardon me for dissing the information superhighway, but without visuals provided by a CD-ROM attachment, cyberspace can be a cyber bore. This is important to remember if you're about to buy your (expensive) first computer and think your life is going to change.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On-line services are cool, until the novelty wears off. After you discover you can chat with people from all over the world, you realize the conversations generally range in topics from teen sexuality all the way to adult sexuality. The access to informational sources, such as encyclopedias and almanacs, is wonderfully handy, but certainly doesn't go beyond what can be found at your local library.
OPINION
April 11, 2013 | By Peter Reiher
North Korea recently launched a cyber attack on South Korean TV stations and banks. Iran carried out a cyber campaign against U.S. banking sites. The U.S. and Israel released malware that disabled Iranian nuclear centrifuges. Or did they? There's no doubt someone did all these things, and there are reasons to believe that those suspected are responsible. But because of the way the Internet is designed and the poor general state of computer security, it is extremely difficult to pinpoint an attack's origin.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
"Disconnect" doesn't need cars, fists or guns. Its tech-obsessed characters do enough damage with their keyboards. The first narrative feature from Henry-Alex Rubin (who directed the Oscar-nominated doc "Murderball") is to smartphones what "Crash" is to racism. Call it "Send. " The weapons are social media, Web cams and chat rooms, and the attackers take turns as victims and villains. Jason Bateman, disguised in a beard, plays the father of an awkward teenager (Jonah Bobo) humiliated by a fake Facebook profile.
WORLD
May 31, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Computer virus experts at Kaspersky Lab, acting with the blessing of the United Nations, were searching for a villain dubbed the Wiper when they came across a much more menacing suspect requiring a new moniker: Flame. The malicious program left experts all but certain that a government sponsor intent on cyber warfare and intelligence gathering was behind some suspicious activity, in part because of the likely cost of such a sophisticated endeavor. "We entered a dark room in search of something and came out with something else in our hands, something different, something huge and sinister," Vitaly Kamlyuk, a senior antivirus expert at Kaspersky Lab, said in an interview Wednesday.
HOME & GARDEN
March 31, 2012 | Margaret Wappler
Several months ago, at the height of my disillusionment with online dating, I created a "Black Swan" profile for a dating site (My "White Swan" profile was up and running on the same site). I didn't actually name the profiles White Swan and Black Swan, but that's how I thought of them, inspired by the deliciously over-the-top Natalie Portman movie that came out around the same time. The White Swan had been busy dating. In fact, she'd just been dumped by a guy who suddenly realized his Westside neighborhood was 20 miles away from her -- my -- Eastside domicile.
OPINION
October 23, 2011 | By Mark Bowden
Earlier this month, researchers discovered a cunning strain of malware, dubbed the Lurid Downloader, that has been systematically and silently stealing data from carefully targeted government computers in 61 countries. The discovery was made by Trend Micro, a Tokyo-based computer security company, which identified the invader as a version of a well-known strain of malware that exploits vulnerabilities in the popular programs Adobe Reader and Microsoft Office. It inserts itself into a computer's core, and then phones home to a remote operator who moves continually from domain to domain on the Internet to avoid detection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Kyle Osborn could be called the Jack Bauer of the virtual age. He's defending American interests from a potentially devastating attack. He's doing so hunched over a laptop, armed with peanut butter and jelly and a jug of iced tea. He is a cyber warrior. "The bad guys always have a head start," he said. "The good guys always have to be reactive. " But he's trying to change that. He is a 20-year-old who said he dropped out of college after two years with a year's worth of credit, but he has made a name — and a living — for himself as a good guy for hire, working for a Santa Clara-based cyber defense company.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Live by the tweet, die by the Twitter sword. That's Jofi Joseph's fate. But he's not the first - and he certainly won't be the last - to perish from the wounds of 140-character cuts. Joseph, most recently a director in the nonproliferation section of the White House's national security staff, was fired after being unmasked as the lamebrain behind the Twitter handle @natsecwonk. And just what irked his bosses? Perhaps tweets like this one, saved by the website the Daily Beast, which smartly anticipated writing the tweeter's Twitter obit someday: “I'm a fan of Obama, but his continuing reliance and dependence upon a vacuous cipher like Valerie Jarrett concerns me.” “Was Huma Abedin wearing beer goggles the night she met Anthony Wiener?
BUSINESS
May 24, 1995 | DANIEL AKST
Last fall, my life as a happy-go-lucky cyberspace wanderer took me to a friendly little computer bulletin board system in the metropolis of York, Pa. This BBS was a reasonably successful venture despite a relatively small number of users, and the reason was live chat. Subscribers to the Cyberia BBS would log on for hours, typing merrily away at one another until they got tired and went to bed, or otherwise were forced to acknowledge life away from the keyboard.
OPINION
May 30, 2011
Egged on by French President Nicolas Sarkozy, the leaders of the Group of 8 nations announced Friday that the Internet was too important for governments to leave ungoverned. Cyberspace needs a legal framework that promotes human rights, the rule of law, privacy, security and the protection of intellectual property, they declared, and they pledged to work on one. Good luck with that. The declaration reflects the wrongheaded wish of many foreign leaders to tame the Net, particularly freewheeling Web-based businesses and online speech.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2010 | By Gregory Karp
The glob a Florida woman found in her daughter's Capri Sun juice pouch was not human tissue. It wasn't a frog, a cow eyeball or anything else quite as gross. It was mold, formed after air got into a damaged package, and it wasn't harmful, according to Kraft Foods Inc., maker of the drink. The unpleasant finding by Melissa Wiegand Brown went viral after she posted photographs of the oval, skin-like mass on her Facebook page, representing the power of the Internet. Reports of the monster mold spread via blogs and began to dominate Kraft's Facebook page, where some posters expressed not just horror at the photos but also outrage at what they perceived to be the company's slow response to the Memorial Day weekend issue.
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