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NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By Carla Hall
Among the virtues of bicycle riding - not burning fossil fuel, not adding to car traffic, enjoying the scenery - is, of course, the health benefit. You get a real workout, especially if you're cycling against the wind or uphill. So when I came across a chart comparing forms of transportation in the Los Angeles city government's 2010 Bicycle Plan, I knew it would confirm that bicycling burned a lot of calories. Sure enough, bicycling 10 miles in an hour burns 484 calories, according to the chart.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Veronica Rocha
A cyclist whose right leg was partially amputated after he was struck by a hit-and-run driver near Griffith Park last year said he has a new mission in life. Damian Kevitt was left wounded, but he remains resilient as he works to shed light on a traffic-safety issue plaguing several Los Angeles County cities - hit-and-run collisions. "It's not only about me. An entire city is starting to galvanize around the idea that it's unacceptable to hit and run," he told Times Community News.
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OPINION
February 23, 2013
Re “ A new spokesman for the thrill sport of biking in L.A. ,” Column, Feb. 19 As a longtime cyclist, both for commuting and recreation, I enjoyed reading Ben Poston's article about his experiences cycling in L.A. But he left out the best part: Cycling in Los Angeles is exciting; it's like doing the running of the bulls everyday. Stan Schwarz Pasadena More letters to the editor ...  
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
A 21-year-old woman who struck a group of cyclists in Boyle Heights while driving intoxicated, leading to the death of one who was dragged several hundred feet by a following car, was sentenced to three years, eight months in prison Tuesday. Wendy Stephanie Villegas pleaded no contest in March to vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated, leaving the scene of an accident and driving under the influence causing injury in the death of  22-year-old Luis "Andy" Garcia. Prosecutors say Villegas was driving on Sept.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Carla Hall
Bicyclists remind drivers all the time that they have as much right to be on the road as car drivers. OK, so should they be licensed like drivers are? We hear that from our commenters on the Roadshare page. I hear it from friends who, driving, get exasperated by bicyclists they see flouting the rules of the road, going through stop signs and traffic lights or swerving harrowingly close to cars. (“And the three-foot rule applies to you,” grumbles a pickup-driving friend, riffing on what he would tell a bicyclist.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Can Los Angeles be a city for cyclists? That's the question The Times asked in its editorial Sunday kicking off its weeks-long exploration of changing transportation priorities. Readers, especially on Facebook , gave us an earful -- and it was, should we say, spirited. The first comment -- "NEVER!" -- set the tone for much of this particular thread, in which the conventional rules on capitalization were not infrequently violated. One piqued reader wrote the following comment -- in original punctuation and capitalization -- further down in the Facebook thread: "Here we go!
BUSINESS
October 13, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
General Motors Co. is killing an advertisement aimed at college students after receiving complaints that it makes fun of people who use bicycles for transportation. That ad has a headline stating, "reality sucks" and depicts a nerdy-looking guy wearing a helmet and riding a bicycle being passed by a cute young woman in the passenger seat of a car. It then goes on to say, "Stop pedaling … start driving" and provides information about discount pricing for GM products such as the new 2012 Chevrolet Sonic subcompact sedan and the giant GMC Sierra 1500 truck.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Nicholas Goldberg
Let me be honest. When I ride my bike through the streets of Los Angeles, I don't always stop at stop signs. And when I pull up at a red light, if no one is coming in either direction, I will sometimes cross against the light. I know it's illegal. But come on, I'm hardly the only one. I rarely see a cyclist wait at a red light if the coast is clear or come to a complete stop at a stop sign if it doesn't seem necessary. So what's the value of a law that is routinely ignored? That's a question that has been asked by many people, including Ted Rogers, who hosts the BikingInLA blog. On his site, Rogers suggests that rather than requiring cyclists to follow the exact same rules as motorists, a better approach would be to change the law to reflect what many if not most cyclists already do: "Turn stop signs into yields, and red lights into stop signs.” In other words, cyclists should be given special dispensation so that when they come to stop signs they don't have to stop, but merely slow and look around and proceed if it is safe to do so. At a red light, they would have to come to a full stop, but if there's no other traffic coming they could move forward even if the light were still red. FULL COVERAGE: Sharing the road in L.A. Rogers didn't invent this idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Amina Khan and Catherine Saillant
The Marathon Crash Race is officially canceled. But the "fun ride" is on. “The city really, really, really, really wanted me to get a permit,” said Don Ward, organizer of the bicycling group Wolfpack Hustle and the annual Marathon Crash Race. “So they worked really hard to get a permit - and as of Friday night at 8 p.m. they got me permit.” Ward credited officials from the Los Angeles Police Department, the city attorney's office and the mayor's office as key players in helping to obtain a permit to make Sunday's ride a reality.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Everything bicycle, from components to frames to accessories, was on display at the Interbike trade show in Las Vegas this week. Assistant business editor David Colker gives an inside look at the show, which featured the products of 750 companies from around the world. Among the trends he reports on as the show wrapped up Friday: electric bicycles and electronic shifting.   ALSO Handmade bicycle industry is on a roll Renegade bike race in L.A. tunnel goes mainstream In L.A., slow and steady is the pace for Flying Pigeon bicycle
OPINION
April 19, 2014
Fancy this: In a city known for its car culture, Angelenos care deeply about their sidewalks. Every time the issue of fixing L.A.'s thousands of miles of neglected walkways gets tackled in the opinion or news pages, at least a dozen readers (not a huge amount, but more than on the average topic) fume about their experiences negotiating sidewalks buckled by massive tree roots or just wear and tear. In response to an editorial  and a news article this week on the city sitting on a $10-million fund for sidewalk repair, 22 readers wrote letters imploring L.A. to take action or offering their advice for improving the walking experience here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
There was not a car in sight along a six-mile stretch of Wilshire Boulevard on Sunday as thousands of Angelenos took over the city's unofficial Main Street to celebrate the ever-popular CicLAvia festival. The usually congested thoroughfare was filled with cyclists, joggers, rollerbladers and at least one unicyclist. One man rolled down the route, a leash in each hand, with two poodle mixes trailing behind. Nathan Freeman, 55, said he rides the route weekly but preferred Sunday's car-free event because it allowed him to enjoy "without worrying about getting hit by vehicles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
Cutting through a Wilshire Boulevard intersection on his silver Razor scooter, relatively alone for a brief moment, George Smith felt weird. It was quiet, there were no cars around him and the crowds had yet to gather for CicLAvia. "It just felt wrong to be in the middle lane," the 32-year-old said. "It's like the zombie apocalypse in L.A. but on bikes. " Smith and his girlfriend, Ally Rogers, 33, had taken the subway from their home in Rialto to downtown L.A. for their first CicLAvia bike festival.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | Eric Kleinsasser, guest blogger
Dear motorists of Los Angeles, On Sunday, six miles of Wilshire Boulevard will be closed to drivers so that pedestrians and cyclists can gather for another installment of CicLAvia . If previous events are any indication, the event will draw large crowds. It's understandable, I suppose. Angelenos get excited at the prospect of wandering freely along car-free streets. But many will return to their cars the next day. Not me, though. FULL COVERAGE: Sharing the road in L.A. Since I started grad school at USC a couple of years ago, my bike and I leave my room in Northeast L.A. each morning and join the ranks of commuters pulsing through the streets of downtown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Ruben Vives and Mark Boster
A sport utility vehicle sheared a fire hydrant and hit a power pole in La Mirada on Friday, sending a geyser of electrified water into the air that shocked a cyclist, authorities said. The crash was reported about 7 a.m. in the 14800 block of Artesia Boulevard, near Knott Avenue, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.  Authorities said the SUV was traveling west on Artesia Boulevard. At the same time, a bicyclist was heading east on the same side of the road, but it's unclear if the driver was trying to avoid hitting the bicyclist, authorities said.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
The Times editorial board has written a lot recently about the politics, policies and practicalities of bicyclists and automobiles sharing the road in Los Angeles. Apparently there's some tension on the streets between motorists and cyclists.   Well, get ready for the next rumble over who owns the asphalt: e-skateboards. Assemblywoman Kristin Olsen (R-Modesto) has introduced legislation that would allow electric motorized skateboards to share the road. If passed, riders could use bike lanes as long as they follow the same rules as bicycles, UT San Diego reported . They wouldn't be allowed on sidewalks and roads without bike lanes.  Electric skateboards were banned from streets in 1977, mainly because the gas-powered models were loud and produced a lot of air pollution for their size.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
Quincy and Monica Jeffries had never seen Wilshire Boulevard so quiet. They smiled as they gazed up at the blue-green façade of the Wiltern theater while waiting for CicLAvia to begin. "You just drive by and you don't recognize all the beautiful buildings," Monica Jeffries, 40, said. The Jeffries, a married couple, drove from Canyon Country in Santa Clarita to participate in CicLAvia on vehicles called trikkes - three-wheeled bike-like vehicles with no pedals. Riders use their entire bodies to steer and maneuver them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Amina Khan and Catherine Saillant
The Marathon Crash Race is officially canceled. But the "fun ride" is on. “The city really, really, really, really wanted me to get a permit,” said Don Ward, organizer of the bicycling group Wolfpack Hustle and the annual Marathon Crash Race. “So they worked really hard to get a permit - and as of Friday night at 8 p.m. they got me permit.” Ward credited officials from the Los Angeles Police Department, the city attorney's office and the mayor's office as key players in helping to obtain a permit to make Sunday's ride a reality.
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