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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1998
Re "Cars, Bikes Needn't Be Deadly Mix," Sept. 27 editorial: As an avid cyclist and board member of the Orange County Bicycle Coalition, thank you for reminding drivers what cyclists already know: We are vulnerable. I take exception, however, to the statement you attributed to the Orange County Sheriff's Department that "bicycle fatalities are not a big problem." That attitude is unfortunate. All traffic fatalities are a big problem: They instantly remove productive citizens from society.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2011 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
The latest bicycle lane in Los Angeles has an interesting twist: It's bright green. The color is aimed at reducing collisions and to help cyclists feel safer on their north-south commute on Spring Street through bustling downtown, where two-wheeled travel is on the rise. At 1.5 miles long — from Cesar Chavez Avenue to 9th Street — the lane is the first in downtown and the first full-color lane in the city. "The really exciting thing with this bike lane is it goes right past City Hall.
NEWS
September 17, 2013 | By Robert Greene
Will the fifth time be the charm for the three-foot rule? Among the hundreds of bills on Gov. Jerry Brown's desk is AB 1371 , which would require a driver to keep at least three feet of space between his or her car and a bicycle when passing. If the governor signs it, the bill would affect all motor vehicles and bicycles sharing the road in California, but it would have special significance for Los Angeles. This city -- long regarded as the nation's most car-loving, driver-centric, petroleum-fueled, bike-hating municipality -- is sponsoring the bill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2009 | Jack Leonard
Like many avid cyclists, Rick Wurtz has his share of horror stories from the road. His closest call came as he pedaled along an open highway in Montana and a big rig rushed by within inches of his handlebars, passing so close that the truck's wake blew him off the road. There is little more terrifying to a cyclist than sitting astride 20 pounds of carbon fiber and aluminum when a motorist encased in 2 tons of steel makes a sudden right turn or bumps the riders. Yet for Wurtz and other cyclists, few episodes have reinforced the dangers as powerfully as last year's crash in which a Brentwood doctor is accused of slamming on the brakes of his car in front of two bike riders, injuring both.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
When I look at the renderings of My Figueroa - the city's first “complete street” designed to equally accommodate drivers, bikers, bus riders and pedestrians - I think, “Now that would be a great walk.” The sidewalk would be wide and lined with trees and planters. There would be new streetlights and benches. The new cycle tracks and transit islands would create a wide buffer from the rush of cars and buses, making the stroll a bit more quiet and peaceful. The four-mile stretch from Exposition Park to 7th Street would make a fine hike, taking in the sights of USC and L.A. Live.
OPINION
July 22, 2011 | By The Times editorial board
L.A. City Councilman Bill Rosendahl says he was inspired to introduce a groundbreaking anti-harassment ordinance for bicyclists after attending a meeting at a local bike shop, where he met a young man whose face had been mangled when he was struck by a hit-and-run driver. "It's about time cyclists had rights; about time they had laws to protect them," Rosendahl says in a YouTube video made to promote his plan. Cyclists already have traffic laws to protect them, but Rosendahl's ordinance, which was approved Wednesday by the City Council, gives them a new way to strike back at drivers who physically assault or threaten to assault them, force them off the road, throw objects at them or otherwise cause injury simply because of their status as cyclists.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Paul Thornton, This post has been updated, as noted below.
Rejoice, cyclists! Thanks to Gov. Jerry Brown's signature, those ton-plus cars whizzing by you soon must do so at a distance of at least three feet -- or not much more than the length of one arm. One arm? Yes, it may not be much, but after five attempts to establish such a modest safety barrier for cyclists, California's new three-foot rule -- to take effect next year -- is a policy victory for those of us who share the road with cars, especially in Los Angeles. But for some readers, it's the cyclists who need to be more cautious.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
It shouldn't have come to this, but it did: Some drivers need to be reminded that no cyclist --  anywhere, ever -- deserves to be hit or killed in a car accident. I say this after reading the comments to my colleague Robert Greene's post this week noting that motorists who strike and sometimes kill cyclists are often sent home by police without so much as a citation. In response, several readers implied that the injured or deceased had it coming. Why? Because bike riders sometimes slow cars down.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Ted Rogers
Wilshire Boulevard on the Westside: I wouldn't want to ride my bike there. Then again, I don't have to. A lot of cyclists don't have that choice, though. According to California law, bicyclists have all the rights and responsibilities of motor vehicle operators, including the right to ride on every public roadway where cars are allowed. The only exception is some limited-access freeways through areas where there are alternative routes that cyclists can use. ABOUT BLOWBACK: FAQs and submission policy That includes dangerously congested streets like Wilshire Boulevard in the Brentwood-Westwood corridor on either side of, and under, the 405 Freeway.
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