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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1998
Re "Cars, Bikes Needn't Be Deadly Mix," Sept. 27 editorial: As an avid cyclist and board member of the Orange County Bicycle Coalition, thank you for reminding drivers what cyclists already know: We are vulnerable. I take exception, however, to the statement you attributed to the Orange County Sheriff's Department that "bicycle fatalities are not a big problem." That attitude is unfortunate. All traffic fatalities are a big problem: They instantly remove productive citizens from society.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2011 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
The latest bicycle lane in Los Angeles has an interesting twist: It's bright green. The color is aimed at reducing collisions and to help cyclists feel safer on their north-south commute on Spring Street through bustling downtown, where two-wheeled travel is on the rise. At 1.5 miles long — from Cesar Chavez Avenue to 9th Street — the lane is the first in downtown and the first full-color lane in the city. "The really exciting thing with this bike lane is it goes right past City Hall.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
It shouldn't have come to this, but it did: Some drivers need to be reminded that no cyclist --  anywhere, ever -- deserves to be hit or killed in a car accident. I say this after reading the comments to my colleague Robert Greene's post this week noting that motorists who strike and sometimes kill cyclists are often sent home by police without so much as a citation. In response, several readers implied that the injured or deceased had it coming. Why? Because bike riders sometimes slow cars down.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Paul Thornton, This post has been updated, as noted below.
Rejoice, cyclists! Thanks to Gov. Jerry Brown's signature, those ton-plus cars whizzing by you soon must do so at a distance of at least three feet -- or not much more than the length of one arm. One arm? Yes, it may not be much, but after five attempts to establish such a modest safety barrier for cyclists, California's new three-foot rule -- to take effect next year -- is a policy victory for those of us who share the road with cars, especially in Los Angeles. But for some readers, it's the cyclists who need to be more cautious.
OPINION
July 22, 2011 | By The Times editorial board
L.A. City Councilman Bill Rosendahl says he was inspired to introduce a groundbreaking anti-harassment ordinance for bicyclists after attending a meeting at a local bike shop, where he met a young man whose face had been mangled when he was struck by a hit-and-run driver. "It's about time cyclists had rights; about time they had laws to protect them," Rosendahl says in a YouTube video made to promote his plan. Cyclists already have traffic laws to protect them, but Rosendahl's ordinance, which was approved Wednesday by the City Council, gives them a new way to strike back at drivers who physically assault or threaten to assault them, force them off the road, throw objects at them or otherwise cause injury simply because of their status as cyclists.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Robert Greene, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
“It's less attractive every year to own an automobile here,”  says Echo Park resident Ryan Johnson, looking up from his bike. Johnson notes the rising cost of parking, the traffic, the hassle. “It's just easier to live without a car. And I don't miss it at all.” Johnson is still in the minority in Los Angeles, but it's a growing minority. He is one of several cyclists featured in “City Cyclists - Competing for Space,” one of two Los Angeles Times videos following the evolving relationship between cyclists and drivers on city streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1995
I have sympathy for the cyclist and his family whose death was discussed in the letter of April 9 "Honor Cyclist Memory by Making Streets Safer." But cyclists should make streets safer by obeying the law. Every morning when I go for a walk, I see a majority of cyclists run stop signs at a high rate of speed. Some don't even stop for a red light if they think it is clear to do so. Why don't they follow the rules of safe cycling? GENE LAWSON Burbank
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Ted Rogers
Wilshire Boulevard on the Westside: I wouldn't want to ride my bike there. Then again, I don't have to. A lot of cyclists don't have that choice, though. According to California law, bicyclists have all the rights and responsibilities of motor vehicle operators, including the right to ride on every public roadway where cars are allowed. The only exception is some limited-access freeways through areas where there are alternative routes that cyclists can use. ABOUT BLOWBACK: FAQs and submission policy That includes dangerously congested streets like Wilshire Boulevard in the Brentwood-Westwood corridor on either side of, and under, the 405 Freeway.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Robert Greene
Spend enough time with cyclists and cycling and it's easy to believe that the world has changed: that the bike has taken over, that pollution is in retreat, that the obesity epidemic has met its match, that the post-World War II thinking about mobility - move fast, in single-occupancy cars - is ancient history. That's especially true at the California by Bike summit, underway in Oakland, where a couple hundred or so cycling advocates have gathered to confer about their movement. So for the advocates, it was sobering to hear California Transportation Secretary Brian Kelly, at the opening session Thursday evening, cite some statistics from a pair of Public Policy Institute of California polls, one in 1995 and one in 2011.
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