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NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
When I look at the renderings of My Figueroa - the city's first “complete street” designed to equally accommodate drivers, bikers, bus riders and pedestrians - I think, “Now that would be a great walk.” The sidewalk would be wide and lined with trees and planters. There would be new streetlights and benches. The new cycle tracks and transit islands would create a wide buffer from the rush of cars and buses, making the stroll a bit more quiet and peaceful. The four-mile stretch from Exposition Park to 7th Street would make a fine hike, taking in the sights of USC and L.A. Live.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1995
I have sympathy for the cyclist and his family whose death was discussed in the letter of April 9 "Honor Cyclist Memory by Making Streets Safer." But cyclists should make streets safer by obeying the law. Every morning when I go for a walk, I see a majority of cyclists run stop signs at a high rate of speed. Some don't even stop for a red light if they think it is clear to do so. Why don't they follow the rules of safe cycling? GENE LAWSON Burbank
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Robert Greene
Spend enough time with cyclists and cycling and it's easy to believe that the world has changed: that the bike has taken over, that pollution is in retreat, that the obesity epidemic has met its match, that the post-World War II thinking about mobility - move fast, in single-occupancy cars - is ancient history. That's especially true at the California by Bike summit, underway in Oakland, where a couple hundred or so cycling advocates have gathered to confer about their movement. So for the advocates, it was sobering to hear California Transportation Secretary Brian Kelly, at the opening session Thursday evening, cite some statistics from a pair of Public Policy Institute of California polls, one in 1995 and one in 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum
There are people who sprint with the bulls in Spain, and people who plunge into icy oceans on New Year's Day. Then there are the several dozen men and women who gathered in Echo Park on Sunday morning at the bottom of a beastly hill and looked up. Before them stretched Fargo Street, one of the city's steepest roads. The challenge: to climb it. On a bicycle. Without stopping. Some tried and failed. Falls were so common that no one blinked when a woman tipped over halfway up the hill and tumbled violently into a bush on the side of the street.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Jon Healey
One of the top complaints of Angelenos in recent years has been the, shall we say, sub-optimal condition of the city's roads. If city officials can persuade more residents to get out of their cars and onto their bicycles, the wear and tear on the roads will diminish. But there's a flip side: The city may face more lawsuits from cyclists who are toppled by potholes, pavement cracks and other hazards of the city's worn streets. And that raises an interesting question: Will Los Angeles have to maintain its roads at an even higher standard than the one it's not meeting today?
OPINION
July 25, 2011
Locked up, badly Re "The hidden hunger strike," Editorial, July 20 Thank you for your continued coverage of the hunger strike by California prisoners. California's prisons are perpetuating a system in which violence breeds more violence, thereby making our society less rather than more safe. No one has to condone the crimes that led these men to prison to be appalled at conditions of confinement that are tantamount to torture. As taxpayers and voters, these abuses are being committed in our name, and we should stop them.
OPINION
January 11, 2010 | By Bob Mionske
Last year's infamous incident on Mandeville Canyon Road -- in which a driver braked hard in front of a group of cyclists, causing two of them to be seriously injured -- began as so many anti-cyclist road-rage incidents do: The driver provoked the cyclists into responding to his verbal assault so he could "justify" using his vehicle to teach them a lesson. In fact, the driver, former emergency room doctor Christopher T. Thompson, was accused of previously using his vehicle to teach cyclists a lesson.
OPINION
September 27, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Colorado Boulevard is going on a diet. The section of the six-lane street that runs through Eagle Rock has begun a serious reducing regimen, with city transportation workers removing one motor vehicle lane in either direction, adding a landscaped median, improving crosswalks and re-striping the street for bike lanes. Other parts of Los Angeles, from Porter Ranch to Venice to South L.A., have already been put on similar "road diets," and other slimming programs in every part of the city are slated for the near future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2011 | Hector Tobar
The city put an emerald road outside my office. Well, it's more of a radioactive green, to be honest. But there it was, greeting me last week upon my arrival at the Times building downtown: a six-foot wide strip of paint running inside the traffic lanes on Spring Street. It's the city's newest bike lane, an inspiration that comes to Los Angeles via the Netherlands, where the people love getting around their cities under their own power so much, they're constantly giving bicycles more of the road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2010 | By Ari B. Bloomekatz
LAPD Chief Charlie Beck is vowing to make his department more responsive to the rights of cyclists, responding to growing complaints from bikers who say the city isn't doing enough to protect them from careless and aggressive motorists. Beck made his pledge Wednesday during a City Hall meeting with bicycle advocates, who want the department to do more to crack down on motorists who don't respect cyclists' right to the road. Beck said bike riders are "our most vulnerable commuters" and that the Los Angeles Police Department needed to do a better job of protecting them.
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