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NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Jon Healey
One of the top complaints of Angelenos in recent years has been the, shall we say, sub-optimal condition of the city's roads. If city officials can persuade more residents to get out of their cars and onto their bicycles, the wear and tear on the roads will diminish. But there's a flip side: The city may face more lawsuits from cyclists who are toppled by potholes, pavement cracks and other hazards of the city's worn streets. And that raises an interesting question: Will Los Angeles have to maintain its roads at an even higher standard than the one it's not meeting today?
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NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
When I look at the renderings of My Figueroa - the city's first “complete street” designed to equally accommodate drivers, bikers, bus riders and pedestrians - I think, “Now that would be a great walk.” The sidewalk would be wide and lined with trees and planters. There would be new streetlights and benches. The new cycle tracks and transit islands would create a wide buffer from the rush of cars and buses, making the stroll a bit more quiet and peaceful. The four-mile stretch from Exposition Park to 7th Street would make a fine hike, taking in the sights of USC and L.A. Live.
NEWS
November 12, 2013 | By Robert Greene
California Bicycle Coalition Executive Director Dave Snyder looked out at a roomful of about 200 bicyclists and asked them if they knew someone who had been killed or seriously injured while riding. Roughly a third of those gathered raised their hands. His aspiration, Snyder said Saturday at last weekend's California by Bike summit in Oakland, was that in 20 years, no young riders would raise their hands. It's the right goal, of course, but the question and the answer were both sobering.
OPINION
July 25, 2011
Locked up, badly Re "The hidden hunger strike," Editorial, July 20 Thank you for your continued coverage of the hunger strike by California prisoners. California's prisons are perpetuating a system in which violence breeds more violence, thereby making our society less rather than more safe. No one has to condone the crimes that led these men to prison to be appalled at conditions of confinement that are tantamount to torture. As taxpayers and voters, these abuses are being committed in our name, and we should stop them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1995
I have sympathy for the cyclist and his family whose death was discussed in the letter of April 9 "Honor Cyclist Memory by Making Streets Safer." But cyclists should make streets safer by obeying the law. Every morning when I go for a walk, I see a majority of cyclists run stop signs at a high rate of speed. Some don't even stop for a red light if they think it is clear to do so. Why don't they follow the rules of safe cycling? GENE LAWSON Burbank
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | Eric Kleinsasser, guest blogger
Dear motorists of Los Angeles, On Sunday, six miles of Wilshire Boulevard will be closed to drivers so that pedestrians and cyclists can gather for another installment of CicLAvia . If previous events are any indication, the event will draw large crowds. It's understandable, I suppose. Angelenos get excited at the prospect of wandering freely along car-free streets. But many will return to their cars the next day. Not me, though. FULL COVERAGE: Sharing the road in L.A. Since I started grad school at USC a couple of years ago, my bike and I leave my room in Northeast L.A. each morning and join the ranks of commuters pulsing through the streets of downtown.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Ted Rogers
Wilshire Boulevard on the Westside: I wouldn't want to ride my bike there. Then again, I don't have to. A lot of cyclists don't have that choice, though. According to California law, bicyclists have all the rights and responsibilities of motor vehicle operators, including the right to ride on every public roadway where cars are allowed. The only exception is some limited-access freeways through areas where there are alternative routes that cyclists can use. ABOUT BLOWBACK: FAQs and submission policy That includes dangerously congested streets like Wilshire Boulevard in the Brentwood-Westwood corridor on either side of, and under, the 405 Freeway.
NEWS
September 17, 2013 | By Robert Greene
Will the fifth time be the charm for the three-foot rule? Among the hundreds of bills on Gov. Jerry Brown's desk is AB 1371 , which would require a driver to keep at least three feet of space between his or her car and a bicycle when passing. If the governor signs it, the bill would affect all motor vehicles and bicycles sharing the road in California, but it would have special significance for Los Angeles. This city -- long regarded as the nation's most car-loving, driver-centric, petroleum-fueled, bike-hating municipality -- is sponsoring the bill.
OPINION
January 11, 2010 | By Bob Mionske
Last year's infamous incident on Mandeville Canyon Road -- in which a driver braked hard in front of a group of cyclists, causing two of them to be seriously injured -- began as so many anti-cyclist road-rage incidents do: The driver provoked the cyclists into responding to his verbal assault so he could "justify" using his vehicle to teach them a lesson. In fact, the driver, former emergency room doctor Christopher T. Thompson, was accused of previously using his vehicle to teach cyclists a lesson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2011 | Hector Tobar
The city put an emerald road outside my office. Well, it's more of a radioactive green, to be honest. But there it was, greeting me last week upon my arrival at the Times building downtown: a six-foot wide strip of paint running inside the traffic lanes on Spring Street. It's the city's newest bike lane, an inspiration that comes to Los Angeles via the Netherlands, where the people love getting around their cities under their own power so much, they're constantly giving bicycles more of the road.
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