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Cypress Ca Ordinances

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1989
Modifying a proposed ordinance, the City Council has expanded the hours that commercial trucks can make deliveries. Representatives from the Arco and Mobil oil companies protested the council's Sept. 25 action that limited delivery hours to between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m., with no deliveries allowed on Sundays or federal holidays. The action came in response to complaints from residents who live near shopping centers and must contend with the noise from deliveries being made throughout the night.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1990 | LYNDA NATALI
The City Council tonight will take up an ordinance requiring all plumbers working in the city to obtain a special permit. The Cypress ordinance would be the first of its kind in an Orange County city. The ordinance, suggested by Councilman John Kanel, would force all plumbers to pass a certification test beyond that required by the State Contractors Licensing Board. "How do we protect homeowners if someone passes (himself) off as a plumber?" Kanel said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1998 | JULIO V. CANO
Hoping to curb noise complaints and crime, the City Council this week approved tougher requirements for businesses offering live entertainment. Businesses with live-entertainment permits now will have to meet noise limits, hire a security guard, and keep doors and windows closed during operating hours. Alcohol is banned outside a business. The City Council requested stronger rules after a year of complaints about several establishments that hold live music permits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1995
The city is reaching its longtime goal of regulating and reducing the number of news racks, officials said. In a special report to the City Council, Public Works Director Mark Stoffels said that a new city ordinance governing the placement of news racks is working well. The council passed the news rack ordinance Jan. 23 and made it effective Aug. 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1995 | BILL BILLITER
In an effort to crack down on lengthy public speeches, the City Council has approved an ordinance that limits speakers to three minutes and voted to purchase a timing device to let speakers know when their time is up. "The new ordinance will be in effect at the council's next meeting, on March 27, and I think we'll have the timer by then also," City Manager Darrell Essex announced at Monday night's council meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994
In a compromise move, the City Council has asked that a new city law be drafted on the amount of temporary signs allowed on storefront windows. The law, which is infrequently enforced, forbids stores to put signs on more than 10% of window space. A new city ordinance, scheduled to be introduced Aug. 8, will allow stores to cover up to 50% of their windows with temporary signs. The compromise is aimed at cracking down on stores that cover virtually all window space with signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1997 | BILL BILLITER
Despite pleas by one councilman and a resident, a divided City Council has repealed the controversial daytime curfew ordinance. The curfew, passed by a split vote of the outgoing City Council last fall, had given police added powers to halt children who are not in school and to issue citations, with fines up to $25, to children without valid excuses. By a 3-2 vote, the Cypress council this week gave final approval to a measure that revokes the curfew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1991 | LYNDA NATALI
Spending 30 hours a week caring for the rabbits of Nature Park has left Jean Sleeper exhausted. So the biologist, who saved the abandoned Easter pets from possible death three months ago, says she has had enough. "I can't do it anymore," said Sleeper, a teacher at Los Alamitos High School. Once more, the fate of the rabbits is up to the City Council, which voted this week to keep the park-turned-petting zoo operating for now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
A bill in the Legislature that would crack down on motels with permanent residents has drawn the support of the City Council. The council, heeding the advice of the League of California Cities, unanimously voted to support Senate Bill 2133. That measure calls for requiring motels having permanent residents to comply with the same housing codes as apartments.
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