Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCypress Ca Ordinances
IN THE NEWS

Cypress Ca Ordinances

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1997 | BILL BILLITER
Despite pleas by one councilman and a resident, a divided City Council has repealed the controversial daytime curfew ordinance. The curfew, passed by a split vote of the outgoing City Council last fall, had given police added powers to halt children who are not in school and to issue citations, with fines up to $25, to children without valid excuses. By a 3-2 vote, the Cypress council this week gave final approval to a measure that revokes the curfew.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1997 | BILL BILLITER
A divided City Council is expected to render its final vote Monday on repealing the city's controversial daytime curfew aimed at curtailing juvenile truancy. By a 3-2 vote last month, the council approved first reading of an ordinance that calls for repealing the curfew. Council members have said nothing has changed their minds on the subject, and another 3-2 vote seems likely on the second and final reading. Repeal would take place 30 days after the final vote on the ordinance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1996 | BILL BILLITER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A divided City Council on Tuesday night gave final approval to a controversial daytime curfew, but the measure is not likely to survive beyond a month, according to council opponents. Councilman Tom Carroll said that he will move for repeal of the ordinance as soon as a new councilman, Tim Keenan, is seated. Keenan reaffirmed Tuesday night that he will vote to overturn it. Keenan and another newly elected council member, Anna Piercy, are scheduled to be installed Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
Two politically hot topics--a daytime curfew for youth and a pay raise for City Council members--are on the agenda for final passage at Tuesday's council session. Both ordinance won preliminary approval on first reading at the council's Oct. 28 meeting, both on 3-2 votes. If they pass Tuesday, they would take effect 30 days later. "I'll be voting for both," Mayor Walter K. Bowman said this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council late Monday gave preliminary approval to a controversial ordinance that would impose a daytime curfew on some school-age youths. The measure, passed on a 3-2 vote, is a watered-down version of a proposal made earlier this year by county police officials, school superintendents and prosecutors. It would target youngsters between 6 and 18 caught skipping class without a valid excuse more than three times in a school year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
Citing a lack of citizen interest, Councilman Tom Carroll said he has dropped his crusade to tighten the city ordinance controlling leaf blowers. Carroll for weeks has been telling other council members that noisy leaf blowers need more regulation. After discussing the issue June 10, the council agreed to seek public comment, but nobody spoke up for change. "The public response is kind of underwhelming," Carroll joked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
Permits for temporary, modular buildings in the city will be given on a case-by-case basis, the City Council has determined. The council said a long-range policy on such temporary buildings may be decided after the city staff provides additional information. The issue came before the council last week when Community Development Director Chris Kelly said St. Irenaeus Church was requesting another three years' approval for a modular building used for day care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
A bill in the Legislature that would crack down on motels with permanent residents has drawn the support of the City Council. The council, heeding the advice of the League of California Cities, unanimously voted to support Senate Bill 2133. That measure calls for requiring motels having permanent residents to comply with the same housing codes as apartments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1996 | JOHN POPE
The City Council voted this week to change the time of its bimonthly public meetings to 7 p.m., half an hour earlier, and to make other modifications, including a limit on speakers' time at the podium. The council will continue to meet on the second and fourth Mondays of the month, starting with a study session and closed session, if needed, at 5:30 p.m. Consent calendar items, formerly discussed at the 5:30 p.m. study session, now will be considered at the 7 p.m. meeting.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|