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Czechoslovakia Celebrations

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June 25, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Down at the foot of Wenceslas Square on Monday, about 20 to 30 bearded men elbowed their way to the center of a milling crowd of onlookers to undergo a ritual barbering, thus fulfilling a promise made 23 years ago--to go unshaven until Soviet troops departed their native soil. The Red Army troops, which led a five-nation Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968, have now pulled out of the country.
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NEWS
June 25, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Down at the foot of Wenceslas Square on Monday, about 20 to 30 bearded men elbowed their way to the center of a milling crowd of onlookers to undergo a ritual barbering, thus fulfilling a promise made 23 years ago--to go unshaven until Soviet troops departed their native soil. The Red Army troops, which led a five-nation Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968, have now pulled out of the country.
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NEWS
October 28, 1988
Czechoslovak police rounded up at least a dozen prominent dissidents in Prague, the capital, as Communist authorities for the first time celebrated the nation's independence in 1918. Dissident sources said that among those detained were members of the Charter 77 human rights movement as well as playwright Vaclav Havel and Roman Catholic activist Vaclav Benda. Although the anniversary of independence actually falls on Oct.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | Times Staff Writer
As Czechoslovakia celebrates the anniversary of its peaceful revolution, new monuments continue to be created in Prague. The latest, set up Thursday in the window of a clothing store on the city's main shopping street, consists of a blood-stained tan raincoat and an explanatory placard. In Czech and English, the placard explains that on the night of Nov. 17, 1989, when police attacked student demonstrators in downtown Prague, among their victims were American reporters covering the events.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of Czechoslovaks underscored their repudiation of communism here Saturday with a jubilant salute to Pope John Paul II, who had championed their rights when they could not. "Today we stand before the ruins of one of the many towers of Babel in human history," the Pope said as an epitaph for four decades of failed communism in Czechoslovakia.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of Czechoslovaks poured into Wenceslas Square on Sunday to sing and cheer and celebrate the victory of their peaceful revolution as the opposition Civic Forum announced it would nominate its leader, playwright Vaclav Havel, as the nation's next president. Havel appears to be the clear favorite to replace hard-line Communist President Gustav Husak, who resigned Sunday shortly after swearing in the first government in 41 years here that the Communists do not control.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their revolution moving toward victory, Prague's students have been back in the streets again. This time, they are celebrating. Just before noon Saturday, about 3,000 students gathered on Narodny Street in the city center, where three weeks ago police attacks on students provided the spark that set Czechoslovak politics ablaze. This time, on the site of the attack, the students gathered to accept thousands of victory roses sent by students from Portugal.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Thousands of Czechoslovaks joined U.S. veterans Saturday for a sun-kissed streetfest in the first celebration ever of the liberation of this beer-brewing city by American troops in World War II. Pubs were turned into imitations of Wild West saloons and youths with U.S. Army paraphernalia rode the streets on vintage Harley-Davidson motorcycles inherited from their parents. Up to 150,000 visitors are expected to descend on Pilsen, a city of 130,000, today, including President Vaclav Havel and U.S.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | Times Staff Writer
As Czechoslovakia celebrates the anniversary of its peaceful revolution, new monuments continue to be created in Prague. The latest, set up Thursday in the window of a clothing store on the city's main shopping street, consists of a blood-stained tan raincoat and an explanatory placard. In Czech and English, the placard explains that on the night of Nov. 17, 1989, when police attacked student demonstrators in downtown Prague, among their victims were American reporters covering the events.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the huge vaulted ceiling of St. Margaret's Basilica, Baroque angels stared down Sunday at thousands of Czechoslovaks celebrating freedom. The normally solemn mood of the day--the third Sunday of Advent in the church calendar--gave way to an almost giddy cheer as church leaders dedicated the Mass to commemorate Czechoslovaks who died for liberty in the past and praise those who have won liberty in the present.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Thousands of Czechoslovaks joined U.S. veterans Saturday for a sun-kissed streetfest in the first celebration ever of the liberation of this beer-brewing city by American troops in World War II. Pubs were turned into imitations of Wild West saloons and youths with U.S. Army paraphernalia rode the streets on vintage Harley-Davidson motorcycles inherited from their parents. Up to 150,000 visitors are expected to descend on Pilsen, a city of 130,000, today, including President Vaclav Havel and U.S.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of Czechoslovaks underscored their repudiation of communism here Saturday with a jubilant salute to Pope John Paul II, who had championed their rights when they could not. "Today we stand before the ruins of one of the many towers of Babel in human history," the Pope said as an epitaph for four decades of failed communism in Czechoslovakia.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the huge vaulted ceiling of St. Margaret's Basilica, Baroque angels stared down Sunday at thousands of Czechoslovaks celebrating freedom. The normally solemn mood of the day--the third Sunday of Advent in the church calendar--gave way to an almost giddy cheer as church leaders dedicated the Mass to commemorate Czechoslovaks who died for liberty in the past and praise those who have won liberty in the present.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of Czechoslovaks poured into Wenceslas Square on Sunday to sing and cheer and celebrate the victory of their peaceful revolution as the opposition Civic Forum announced it would nominate its leader, playwright Vaclav Havel, as the nation's next president. Havel appears to be the clear favorite to replace hard-line Communist President Gustav Husak, who resigned Sunday shortly after swearing in the first government in 41 years here that the Communists do not control.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their revolution moving toward victory, Prague's students have been back in the streets again. This time, they are celebrating. Just before noon Saturday, about 3,000 students gathered on Narodny Street in the city center, where three weeks ago police attacks on students provided the spark that set Czechoslovak politics ablaze. This time, on the site of the attack, the students gathered to accept thousands of victory roses sent by students from Portugal.
NEWS
October 28, 1988
Czechoslovak police rounded up at least a dozen prominent dissidents in Prague, the capital, as Communist authorities for the first time celebrated the nation's independence in 1918. Dissident sources said that among those detained were members of the Charter 77 human rights movement as well as playwright Vaclav Havel and Roman Catholic activist Vaclav Benda. Although the anniversary of independence actually falls on Oct.
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