Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCzechoslovakia
IN THE NEWS

Czechoslovakia

NEWS
August 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
The leaders of the Czech and Slovak republics agreed late Wednesday to dissolve the Czechoslovak federation on Jan. 1. The announcement was made after eight hours of talks between Czech Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus and his Slovak counterpart, Vladimir Meciar, in the south-central city of Brno. "On January 1, there will be two republics, two states," said Meciar. "I am sure we shall be able to form better relations with Slovakia than we have now," said Klaus.
Advertisement
SPORTS
August 3, 1992
Mike Evans of Ontario scored two goals and seven other players in an all-California lineup scored one apiece for the U.S. water polo team during a 9-3 rout of Czechoslovakia in preliminary-round play. Other goal scorers for the U.S. were Doug Kimbell of Orange, Charlie Harris of Indian Wells, Chris Humbert of Lodi, Terry Schroeder of Agoura Hills, Craig Klass of Danville, Erich Fischer of Reedley and Alex Rousseau of Santa Monica.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | From Reuters
The leaders of Czechoslovakia's two deeply divided parts said Thursday they have agreed on how to split the country peacefully. Czech Premier Vaclav Klaus and his Slovak counterpart, Vladimir Meciar, said they will ask Parliament to pass a law to wind up the Czechoslovak federation. "We'd like the Federal Assembly to pass the law by September 30," Klaus, sitting alongside Meciar, told a news conference in the Slovak capital, Bratislava.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vaclav Havel, the playwright who led the "Velvet Revolution" against communism, stepped down as president after failing to halt Czechoslovakia's disintegration. The resignation left the country without a president as its Czech and Slovak regions moved toward a formal dissolution of the 74-year-old nation. Unlike in Yugoslavia and parts of the former Soviet Union, a peaceful split appears certain. Havel was an increasingly lonely voice against ending the union of Czechs and Slovaks.
NEWS
July 18, 1992 | From Associated Press
President Vaclav Havel said Friday that he is resigning, ending his struggle to spare Czechoslovakia from the post-Communist nationalism that is now dividing much of Eastern Europe. Havel, an eloquent dissident playwright who led the "Velvet Revolution" that peacefully ended Communist rule here in 1989, was blocked by Slovaks earlier this month when he sought reelection in Parliament.
NEWS
June 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Vaclav Havel insisted that Czechoslovakia's future should be decided by a referendum--not by an agreement between Czech and Slovak leaders that could split the country without a popular vote. A referendum "is so far the only constitutional way of making such a change," he said. Czech leader Vaclav Klaus said a referendum has not been ruled out.
NEWS
June 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
Czech and Slovak leaders agreed early today to split Czechoslovakia into two nations, ending their 74-year-old federation. Czech leader Vaclav Klaus and Vladimir Meciar, the most powerful man in the Slovak lands, said their regional parliaments would make the final arrangements for the country's future--leaving the slightest possibility that Czechoslovakia might survive. But both sides made clear that three years after the "velvet revolution," the "velvet divorce" is inevitable.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parliamentary elections in Czechoslovakia set the stage Saturday for a summer of protracted negotiations between Czechs and Slovaks over economic issues and still more wrangling over the relationship between the two republics.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is still two weeks before the parliamentary elections, and the competitors are trying hard to keep the optimism factor high as voters decide which parties and program will lead Czechoslovakia in the crucial next four years of its march through the hazards and dislocations of economic reform and political growing pains.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|