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D Allan Bromley

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February 14, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
"Spin control" was the sort of phenomenon that D. Allan Bromley--as a nuclear physicist--explored in papers such as "Enhanced E1 Deexcitations in Ra-128 and the Evolution of Reflection Symmetry at Moderate Spins." As Bush's White House science adviser, Bromley's science of spin control is less Einsteinian than Darmanesque.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
Nuclear physicist D. Allan Bromley, a Yale University professor and an architect of U.S. science policy during the administration of former President Bush, has died. He was 79. Bromley died Thursday afternoon, the university said. The cause of death was not immediately released.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
Nuclear physicist D. Allan Bromley, a Yale University professor and an architect of U.S. science policy during the administration of former President Bush, has died. He was 79. Bromley died Thursday afternoon, the university said. The cause of death was not immediately released.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
"Spin control" was the sort of phenomenon that D. Allan Bromley--as a nuclear physicist--explored in papers such as "Enhanced E1 Deexcitations in Ra-128 and the Evolution of Reflection Symmetry at Moderate Spins." As Bush's White House science adviser, Bromley's science of spin control is less Einsteinian than Darmanesque.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush disclosed during the Malta summit that hehad reversed himself and now favors adoption of a global warming treaty, it confirmed what D. Allan Bromley has been telling science audiences all year: When he talks, the President listens. That the White House science adviser has the ear of the President is in itself a notable turnaround. Most of Bromley's predecessors during the last quarter-century have wielded little clout, especially during the Reagan years.
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush's science adviser on Friday approved the October launching of a nuclear-powered probe to Jupiter despite claims by protesters that a Challenger-like accident could poison Earth's atmosphere with "the most toxic substance in the universe." D. Allan Bromley authorized the launching and told Bush before the President left for a weekend at Camp David, Md., White House spokeswoman Alixe Reed said.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | From the Times Washington Bureau
ENOUGH REFORM, ALREADY: Look for President Bush to propose new, less stringent, financial disclosure rules for federal appointees this spring. It has taken Bush more than a year to fill the major vacancies in his Administration, and the lengthy process has left the President and his aides frustrated--particularly at the mountain of paper work needed to clear each appointee. The biggest culprit is financial disclosure, White House aides insist, saying current rules are too burdensome.
NEWS
March 6, 1986
A White House advisory panel that studied the health of the nation's colleges and universities concluded they are weighed down with aging buildings and outmoded equipment and need more federal money. But, along with money, the institutions also need "to develop real cultural changes . . . in government, universities and industry," said D. Allan Bromley, a professor of physics at Yale University and vice chairman of the White House Science Council's Panel on the Health of U.S.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Environmental Protection Agency has rebuffed what some say was a White House attempt to weaken a report on health risks from household electrical and magnetic fields. The report says studies asserting that fields cause cancer "are biologically plausible." White House science adviser D. Allan Bromley had urged the EPA to select some candidates for the panel from a list of scientists known to believe that the fields pose little or no risk. No one Bromley proposed was selected.
NEWS
March 5, 1986 | Associated Press
A White House advisory panel that studied the health of the nation's colleges and universities has concluded that they are weighed down with aging buildings and outmoded equipment and need more federal money, a leader of the group says. "The university and college system is not healthy at all. It is in rather a parlous condition," said D. Allan Bromley, a professor of physics at Yale University and vice chairman of the White House Science Council's Panel on the Health of U.S.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | From the Times Washington Bureau
ENOUGH REFORM, ALREADY: Look for President Bush to propose new, less stringent, financial disclosure rules for federal appointees this spring. It has taken Bush more than a year to fill the major vacancies in his Administration, and the lengthy process has left the President and his aides frustrated--particularly at the mountain of paper work needed to clear each appointee. The biggest culprit is financial disclosure, White House aides insist, saying current rules are too burdensome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush disclosed during the Malta summit that hehad reversed himself and now favors adoption of a global warming treaty, it confirmed what D. Allan Bromley has been telling science audiences all year: When he talks, the President listens. That the White House science adviser has the ear of the President is in itself a notable turnaround. Most of Bromley's predecessors during the last quarter-century have wielded little clout, especially during the Reagan years.
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush's science adviser on Friday approved the October launching of a nuclear-powered probe to Jupiter despite claims by protesters that a Challenger-like accident could poison Earth's atmosphere with "the most toxic substance in the universe." D. Allan Bromley authorized the launching and told Bush before the President left for a weekend at Camp David, Md., White House spokeswoman Alixe Reed said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1989
The best news coming out of the summit could well be President Bush's announcement to provide U.S. leadership on the global warming issue. The Cold War may be over but the "hot war" is just beginning. Bush and his science adviser, D. Allan Bromley, have proved they are both rational beings. They saw the scientific evidence, they read the reports, they discussed the issue with scientists and they decided that yes, indeed, the worldwide threat to the atmosphere from carbon dioxide and other "greenhouse" gases is very real and must be dealt with.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | From the Washington Post
President Bush has selected a nationally renowned nuclear physicist from Yale University, D. Allan Bromley, as White House science adviser, senior Administration officials said Wednesday. "This is a great appointment," said Leon Lederman, director of the Fermilab accelerator near Chicago and a Nobel laureate who has known Bromley for decades. "He has the respect of the scientific community. He is vigorous and lively and he will be a wise voice on difficult issues. Of course, a lot depends upon the chemistry between him and the President."
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