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D B Cooper

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NEWS
July 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
An FBI agent who investigated the D. B. Cooper airliner hijacking said Friday there are a number of similarities between Cooper and a man recently arrested in an 18-year-old New Jersey multiple murder case. Ralph Himmelsbach, who retired in 1980, said Friday that he believes Cooper died when he parachuted from a Boeing 727 over southwest Washington in 1971 with $200,000 in ransom. But Himmelsbach, who led the Cooper investigation, still believes that John E. List should be investigated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Becoming perhaps the first airplane hijacker to merit in-depth attention from a museum, D.B. Cooper will be the subject of an exhibition opening in August at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. Something of a folk hero along the lines of fellow outlaws Jesse James and Billy the Kid, D.B. Cooper hijacked a plane flying to Seattle out of Portland International Airport on Nov. 24, 1971, and later parachuted away with $200,000 in ransom money, never to be seen again. Some believe Cooper perished in his escape efforts, but the rest of his story remains a mystery.
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NEWS
December 3, 1989 | From United Press International
Two former law enforcement officers believe that the mysterious airplane hijacker D. B. Cooper may have been a Utah man who staged a similar crime five months later. Former FBI agent Russell Calame and Bernie Rhodes, a former federal probation officer, have written a book making a case that Cooper was really Richard Floyd McCoy Jr., a Mormon Sunday School teacher and law enforcement student from Provo, Utah, who was caught after hijacking a plane in April, 1972.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
D.B. Cooper, the infamous hijacker who leaped to fame from a jetliner nearly 40 years ago, may, in fact, be a man who died of natural causes a decade ago, according to a "credible" tip under investigation by the FBI. The Seattle Times reported Monday that FBI agents requested the personal effects of a possible suspect after receiving a tip from a retired law enforcement official. So far, efforts to connect the dead man to Cooper include attempting to match fingerprints found on the clip-on tie left behind on the aircraft, although nothing conclusive has been discovered, according to the newspaper.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2005 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
Some people spend their summer days lounging on beaches or hiking up mountains. Others retreat into movie houses and bookstores. For California lawyer and former FBI agent Richard Tosaw, summer means trekking to the Columbia River and continuing his 24-year search for the legendary skyjacker known as D.B. Cooper. Thirty-four years ago, above this southwest Washington city, Cooper parachuted from a jetliner with $200,000 -- and into folk-hero stardom. He was never seen or heard from again.
NEWS
November 25, 1986 | JAMES MARNELL
--It's been more than 15 years since D. B. Cooper handed a note to a Northwest Airlines stewardess and said: "Miss, you'd better look at that note. I have a bomb." The man who has since come to be a folk hero of sorts leaped out of the airplane somewhere north of the Oregon border on Nov. 21, 1971, with $200,000 strapped to his body. Cooper was never found, but in 1980 Brian Ingram, 8, found $5,800 on a Columbia River beach near Vancouver, Wash. Now, Richard T.
BOOKS
February 2, 1986 | SCHULYER INGLE
D. B. COOPER: WHAT REALLY HAPPENED by Max Gunther (Contemporary: $14.95; illustrated). Fourteen years ago, D. B. Cooper became the first man to successfully hijack a commercial jetliner. Having threatened to blow up the 727, Cooper asked for and received two parachutes and $200,000. The jet took off with Cooper, the only paying passenger, and somewhere over southwestern Washington State, he jumped off the back steps of the jet into the night and disappeared.
NEWS
September 13, 1989
John Emil List, who faces charges of murdering five members of his family before disappearing in 1971, is not the infamous airliner hijacker D.B. Cooper, investigators said in Elizabeth, N.J. Frank Marranca, a captain of detectives with the Union County prosecutor's office, said investigators have found nothing to tie List to the man who jumped out of an airliner and into the nation's folklore two weeks after List vanished. List disappeared around Nov.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | KARL VICK
"What's really hurt the guy in terms of turning it into a PR coup, another D.B. Cooper, is his name's so dull. Philip Johnson. Even I can't remember it," says Al Wells, who wrote a song about Johnson's heist for a Jacksonville, Fla., radio station. Twenty-six years ago, Cooper parachuted from the airliner he hijacked with exactly 1% of what Johnson stole. Cooper struck on Thanksgiving eve, dropping into a stormy night with his $200,000 ransom somewhere between Portland, Ore., and Seattle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Becoming perhaps the first airplane hijacker to merit in-depth attention from a museum, D.B. Cooper will be the subject of an exhibition opening in August at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. Something of a folk hero along the lines of fellow outlaws Jesse James and Billy the Kid, D.B. Cooper hijacked a plane flying to Seattle out of Portland International Airport on Nov. 24, 1971, and later parachuted away with $200,000 in ransom money, never to be seen again. Some believe Cooper perished in his escape efforts, but the rest of his story remains a mystery.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2011 | Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
A few charred $20 bills in the forest, a bunch of unidentified fingerprints and a few witnesses' descriptions are among the tantalizing bits of evidence left by elusive airline hijacker D.B. Cooper, who parachuted out of a Boeing 727 with a $200,000 ransom in 1971 and vanished. The mysterious Cooper became a legend for outsmarting corporate America and evading the FBI for 40 years. But now investigators are pursuing a new lead that might put the case to rest — or not. The FBI's Seattle office is looking into a tip from a witness who contends the hijacker died 10 years ago, FBI Special Agent Frederick Gutt said Monday.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Fifteen tattered $20 bills recovered from the 1971 D.B. Cooper skyjacking sold for more than 120 times their face value at a Dallas auction. Heritage Auction Galleries said the bills sold for a total of more than $37,000 -- two to three times higher than expected. Winning bidders paid about $6,500 each for two of the $20 bills. The money has the handwritten initials of investigators who examined the bills, which were found buried in sand in 1980. Cooper skyjacked a flight from Portland, Ore., to Seattle, claiming he had a bomb.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2008 | Hugo Kugiya, Special to The Times
After a search that has lasted more than 36 years, all of the evidence in the case of the legendary outlaw known as D.B. Cooper fits easily into an inconspicuous box, carried comfortably under the arm of FBI agent Larry Carr. He is the newest in a line of about a dozen agents assigned to the case since 1971, when Cooper hijacked a passenger jet and bailed out over Clark County, Wash., with $200,000 in $20 bills. When the last agent moved on six months ago, Carr requested to take the case.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A tangled, torn parachute found buried last month was not the one used by plane hijacker D.B. Cooper when he bailed out of an airliner over the Pacific Northwest, the FBI said in Seattle. Investigators reached that conclusion after speaking with parachute experts, including Earl Cossey, who packed the chutes provided to Cooper that rainy November night in 1971.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2008 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
In this damp, largely forgotten corner of the state, where loggers and former loggers live and drink in obscurity, the talk of the town has swirled around a dirt-stained clump of fabric recently unearthed not far from here. It turned out to be part of a nylon parachute that roughly matched the dimensions of the one used by legendary hijacker "D.B. Cooper," who leapt from a jetliner with $200,000 into folk-hero stardom 36 years ago. He is believed to have landed somewhere in this area.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2005 | By Tomas Alex Tizon, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Some people spend their summer days lounging on beaches or hiking up mountains. Others retreat into movie houses and bookstores. For California lawyer and former FBI agent Richard Tosaw, summer means trekking to the Columbia River and continuing his 24-year search for the legendary skyjacker known as D.B. Cooper. Thirty-four years ago, above this southwest Washington city, Cooper parachuted from a jetliner with $200,000 -- and into folk-hero stardom. He was never seen or heard from again.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Fifteen tattered $20 bills recovered from the 1971 D.B. Cooper skyjacking sold for more than 120 times their face value at a Dallas auction. Heritage Auction Galleries said the bills sold for a total of more than $37,000 -- two to three times higher than expected. Winning bidders paid about $6,500 each for two of the $20 bills. The money has the handwritten initials of investigators who examined the bills, which were found buried in sand in 1980. Cooper skyjacked a flight from Portland, Ore., to Seattle, claiming he had a bomb.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
D.B. Cooper, the infamous airplane hijacker who vaulted into urban mythology by parachuting out of a jetliner over the Pacific Northwest with a $200,000 ransom, is back on the FBI's radar screen. Cooper, whose case remains the only unsolved airline hijacking in U.S. history, became the stuff of legend on the night of Nov. 24, 1971, when he jumped from a Boeing 727 into the skies between Portland, Ore., and Seattle. He disappeared with the ransom he extorted -- 10,000 $20 bills. The case has remained open, but the trail has been cold despite hundreds of tips, thousands of theories and dozens of breakthroughs in scientific investigation.
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