Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsD Day
IN THE NEWS

D Day

NEWS
June 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
World War II veterans looked back to 56 years ago and others paused to honor them Tuesday as crowds celebrated the opening of the National D-Day Museum. Retired Sgt. Charles H. Porbes wore his dress greens and medals. Arnold Smith's reunion baseball cap and "World War II veteran" tag were all that marked his military service.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 31, 1994 | From Associated Press
While thousands jammed beaches across the country, others spent Memorial Day remembering another beach--Normandy--and paying tribute to those who fought and died there a half-century ago. With the 50th anniversary of D-day only days away, the invasion that was a turning point of World War II was a recurring topic of Memorial Day speeches, ceremonies and prayers. Abroad, in St. James, France, Fabien Meron stood amid a sea of white crosses at the U.S.
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | The text of President Clinton's speech commemorating D-day, delivered at the American Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer, France:
Mr. (Joseph) Dawson, (a highly decorated American D-day veteran), you did your men proud today. Gen. (John M.) Shalikashvili (chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff), Mr. (Walter) Cronkite (former CBS newsman), chaplain, distinguished leaders of our government, members of Congress, members of the armed services, our hosts from France and most of all, our veterans, their families and their friends: In these last days of ceremonies, we have heard wonderful words of tribute.
NEWS
May 28, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long gone are the boys of Bedford, gone these 50 years, lost in the roiling English Channel and on the sands of Omaha, cut down by German pillboxes and artillery shells that blew men and machines and whole boats out of the water.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1994 | Howard Rosenberg
" I ducked my head under the sharp cracking that was going overhead. " --War correspondent Ernest Hemingway with U.S. troops under fire in a landing craft approaching France, June 6, 1944 Good morning, Normandy! This is an invasion.
WORLD
January 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder will become the first German leader to attend a commemoration of the 1944 D-day landings in June, after being invited by France. Ten years ago, Paris did not ask Chancellor Helmut Kohl to the high-profile 50th anniversary. French President Jacques Chirac's invitation marks a gesture of reconciliation contrasting with that apparent snub. "Mr.
NEWS
May 31, 1994
Breakdown of 153,500-man invasion force. U.S.: 46% British and Canadian: 54% Casualties: The number of American casualties on D-day compare to other massive U.S. battles (includes dead, wounded, missing or captured): Tet Offensive (first week): 3,173 D-day (first 24 hours): 6,603 Pearl Harbor: 3,681 Chancellorsville (Civil War): 29,600 Gettysburg: 43,400 Chickamauga: 34,700 Number of troops they commanded Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower (June 6, 1944): 2.50 million Gen. John Pershing (Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1994 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troops are preparing to storm ashore at Santa Monica on June 1, but the invading force will be friendly and acting for a good cause--history. The planned landing on Santa Monica beach, to involve a World War II-vintage landing craft and veterans of the Normandy invasion, will be part of an elaborate commemoration of the 50th anniversary of D-day called "Merci l'Amerique."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|