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D H Lawrence

NEWS
April 7, 1988
Anthony Pelissier, 75, who began his career as a stage actor but won fame as a director of plays and films. He directed and wrote the screenplays of two widely shown films, "The History of Mr. Polly," based on a novel by H.G. Wells, and "The Rocking Horse Winner," based on a short story by D.H. Lawrence. Pelissier, who also directed and produced plays, was the son of Fay Compton, a leading actress, and of theater producer H.G. Pelissier.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 2009 | David Sarno
Amazon.com Inc. on Monday blamed a "cataloging error" for the removal of more than 57,000 titles from its main search function. The disappearance of books such as "Ellen DeGeneres: A Biography," "Milk: A Pictorial History of Harvey Milk" and "Greek Homosexuality" this weekend created an uproar among consumers who wondered why works that dealt with sexual orientation were being marginalized.
BOOKS
May 29, 1994 | ROBERT TOWNE, "Chinatown" was issued in a limited edition by Neville Publishing (Santa Barbara) in 1983. In October, Robert Towne will publish " ' Chinatown, ' ' The Last Detail, ' ' Shampoo ' : Screenplays" with Grove Atlantic Press
It was in Eugene, Oregon, in April of 1971 that I ran across a public library copy of Carey McWilliams' "Southern California Country: An Island on the Land"--and with it the crime that formed the basis for "Chinatown." It wasn't the compendium of facts in the chapter "Water! Water! Water!" or indeed in the entire book. It was that Carey McWilliams wrote about Southern California with sensibilities my eye, ear, and nose recognized. Along with Chandler he made me feel that he'd not only walked down the same streets and into the same arroyo--he smelled the eucalyptus, heard the humming of high tension wires, saw the same bleeding Madras landscapes--and so a sense of deja vu was underlined by a sense of jamais vu: No writers had ever spoken as strongly to me about my home.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Sir Harold Acton, a writer, art collector and contemporary of some of the century's leading creative and political figures, has died. He was 89. An heir to a British family with deep ties to Italian nobility, Acton died Sunday at his villa, La Pietra, outside Florence. He was the author of more than 25 books, including biographies such as "The Last Medici" in 1932, and accounts of his years as a university professor in China. He also was a renowned art collector and patron.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Stella Gibbons, a prolific writer who will probably be remembered only for "Cold Comfort Farm," her satiric tale of comic genius, died Tuesday at age 87. Miss Gibbons, who suffered from a heart condition, died at her home in north London. She wrote more than 30 novels and volumes of short stories and poems, but none rivaled her celebrated satire, which parodied an earthy, regional school of writing popular at the turn of the century.
TRAVEL
May 5, 1985
I always save the Times Travel section to read at leisure, and to savor as I relive travels and plan trips. Jerry Hulse's Travel Tips are an invaluable source of information for the intrepid traveler. I was glad to see the recommendations for the English Literature Summer School in Tips, April 7. The course offered in "The Writer and the Environment," and I can recommend it as one of the most enjoyable summer experiences i've had. I took the course for two weeks last July while I lived with a wonderful English family, wxperiencing English family life in depth.
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