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D J Waldie

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FOOD
December 23, 2009 | By D. J. Waldie
I was going to bring something to the office for the holidays the other day. I pulled out my mother's baking sheets and thought, but only for a moment, that I should make a couple dozen chocolate chip cookies, straight from the recipe on the bag of chocolate chips, just as my mother did every year at Christmas. I didn't. You can't serve your nostalgia that way. Only in memory. I remember that when I was a boy, my mother was the best cook in the neighborhood. Lots of sons remember their mother's cooking as being the best.
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FOOD
December 23, 2009 | By D. J. Waldie
I was going to bring something to the office for the holidays the other day. I pulled out my mother's baking sheets and thought, but only for a moment, that I should make a couple dozen chocolate chip cookies, straight from the recipe on the bag of chocolate chips, just as my mother did every year at Christmas. I didn't. You can't serve your nostalgia that way. Only in memory. I remember that when I was a boy, my mother was the best cook in the neighborhood. Lots of sons remember their mother's cooking as being the best.
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BOOKS
August 25, 1996 | Margaret Crawford, Margaret Crawford is an architectural historian and chair of the history and theory of architecture program at the Southern California Institute of Architecture. Her most recent book is "Building the Workman's Paradise: The Design of Working Towns."
As someone who studies and writes about the relationship between ordinary places and everyday life, I felt vindicated by "Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir." Finally, a book as complicated as the suburbs themselves. The author, D. J. Waldie, raises their interpretation to a new level of art and understanding. Snobs say, "The suburbs are disgustingly boring." Populists respond, "This is what people want."
HOME & GARDEN
November 1, 2007 | Thomas Curwen, Times Staff Writer
DIANE KEATON and D.J. Waldie are uncertain where to begin. It's an awkward moment at the end of an easy hour-and-a-half conversation about architecture, romance and modernism. She's self-conscious, and he's busy trying to set her at ease. Scattered across a large conference table in an equally large conference room in Lakewood are copies of photographs from the book they have spent nearly two years working on. "I really don't want to do this," she says.
BOOKS
June 27, 2004 | Kevin Starr, Kevin Starr, a professor of history at USC and state librarian emeritus, is the author of numerous books, including the forthcoming "Coast of Dreams: California on the Edge, 1990-2003."
In essayist D.J. Waldie, the Plains of Id have found a voice. The Plains of Id: That is what Reyner Banham called the suburbanized flatlands of Los Angeles County in his classic 1971 study, "Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies," as if to suggest this region was a vast and submerged steppe, brooding and inchoate, subconscious in its knowledge of itself, resentful of the more glittery possibilities of the upscale communities aligning its borders.
HOME & GARDEN
November 1, 2007 | Thomas Curwen, Times Staff Writer
DIANE KEATON and D.J. Waldie are uncertain where to begin. It's an awkward moment at the end of an easy hour-and-a-half conversation about architecture, romance and modernism. She's self-conscious, and he's busy trying to set her at ease. Scattered across a large conference table in an equally large conference room in Lakewood are copies of photographs from the book they have spent nearly two years working on. "I really don't want to do this," she says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2000 | Alex Katz, (714) 966-5977
California Book Award-winning author D.J. Waldie will speak about his work at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 15 at the Orange Main Library, 101 N. Center St. The event is free. Reservations: (714) 288-2410.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012
Panel: History — City of Angels When: 11:30 a.m. Sunday Where: Seeley G. Mudd building at USC Who: Leo Braudy, John Buntin, Steve J. Ross, D.J. Waldie, moderated by Richard Rayner
HOME & GARDEN
May 1, 2003
D.J. Waldie, in his paean to Lakewood and the nostalgia of the '50s suburban fantasy ("Finding Humility and a Kind of Paradise," April 24), left out one particularly ugly fact regarding the dark side of that fantasy: Minorities were not permitted to purchase homes in Lakewood until the mid- to late '60s. Developers engaged in a deliberate, systemic policy of racial exclusion. He says, "My neighborhood in 1950 was the place where the suburban stories of L.A. were first mass-produced. They were stories then for displaced Okies and Arkies, Jews who knew the pain of exclusion, Catholics who thought they did and anyone white with a steady job."
OPINION
August 5, 2004
Re "How Blue Was My Valley," Opinion, Aug. 1: D.J. Waldie sets up a straw man and then destroys it. He postulates a conservancy for the Owens Valley and then attacks all state conservancies. The only person mentioning a conservancy for the Owens Valley was L.A. Mayor James Hahn, and he then withdrew the idea. What environmentalists and a growing number of citizens want is a conservation easement on the development rights on the lands in the Eastern Sierra owned by the city of Los Angeles.
BOOKS
June 27, 2004 | Kevin Starr, Kevin Starr, a professor of history at USC and state librarian emeritus, is the author of numerous books, including the forthcoming "Coast of Dreams: California on the Edge, 1990-2003."
In essayist D.J. Waldie, the Plains of Id have found a voice. The Plains of Id: That is what Reyner Banham called the suburbanized flatlands of Los Angeles County in his classic 1971 study, "Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies," as if to suggest this region was a vast and submerged steppe, brooding and inchoate, subconscious in its knowledge of itself, resentful of the more glittery possibilities of the upscale communities aligning its borders.
BOOKS
August 25, 1996 | Margaret Crawford, Margaret Crawford is an architectural historian and chair of the history and theory of architecture program at the Southern California Institute of Architecture. Her most recent book is "Building the Workman's Paradise: The Design of Working Towns."
As someone who studies and writes about the relationship between ordinary places and everyday life, I felt vindicated by "Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir." Finally, a book as complicated as the suburbs themselves. The author, D. J. Waldie, raises their interpretation to a new level of art and understanding. Snobs say, "The suburbs are disgustingly boring." Populists respond, "This is what people want."
OPINION
June 22, 2004
D.J. Waldie's June 18 commentary, "Crash of Symbols, and Then Nothing," was inspired. The controversy surrounding the tiny cross on the Los Angeles County seal is really about intolerance. This tiny cross does nothing to establish religion. The cross memorializes our Spanish heritage and the brave Christian missionaries who, under the direction of Padre Junipero Serra and Padre Fermin Lausen, established 21 missions stretching from San Diego to San Francisco. The effort to remove the cross is part of a nationwide campaign by the American Civil Liberties Union to remove any vestige of Christian symbolism from the public arena.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
KCET announced that "SoCal Connected" will air a special episode Monday in memory of Huell Howser, the longtime host of KCET's "California's Gold," "Visiting With Huell Howser," "California's Golden Parks" and "California's Green. " Cameraman Luis Fuerte, who worked with Howser for most of his career, and producer Phil Noyes will share their memories along with author and historian D.J. Waldie. KCET executives Al Jerome and Mary Mazur are also scheduled to appear. The special airs at 5:30 p.m. and repeats at 10. ALSO: Huell Howser dies at 67 Huell Howser: Career in pictures Huell Howser: On "California's Gold," he was main attraction
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