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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Rev. D. James Kennedy, a pioneering Christian broadcaster and mega-church pastor whose fiercely conservative worldview helped fuel the rise of the religious right in American politics, died Wednesday. He was 76. Kennedy died at his home in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., said Kristin Cole, a spokeswoman for Kennedy's Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church. The cause of death has not been determined, but Kennedy had not been seen publicly since he suffered cardiac arrest Dec. 28.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Rev. D. James Kennedy, a pioneering Christian broadcaster and mega-church pastor whose fiercely conservative worldview helped fuel the rise of the religious right in American politics, died Wednesday. He was 76. Kennedy died at his home in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., said Kristin Cole, a spokeswoman for Kennedy's Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church. The cause of death has not been determined, but Kennedy had not been seen publicly since he suffered cardiac arrest Dec. 28.
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MAGAZINE
July 28, 1996 | PAT JORDAN, Pat Jordan is a freelance writer in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. His last piece for the magazine looked at Miami's Los Angeles connection
In the nucleus of the evangelical empire he built from scratch, the Rev. D. James Kennedy bats away the notion that his achievements have made him susceptible to the first deadly sin. "Pride," says Kennedy with a thin smile. "Jumping on poor St. Thomas again, as if he hasn't been beat up enough." His smile fades, and he clears his throat. "Yes, of course, I suffer all the temptations. But God has given me a thorn in the flesh. A football injury from high school.
MAGAZINE
July 28, 1996 | PAT JORDAN, Pat Jordan is a freelance writer in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. His last piece for the magazine looked at Miami's Los Angeles connection
In the nucleus of the evangelical empire he built from scratch, the Rev. D. James Kennedy bats away the notion that his achievements have made him susceptible to the first deadly sin. "Pride," says Kennedy with a thin smile. "Jumping on poor St. Thomas again, as if he hasn't been beat up enough." His smile fades, and he clears his throat. "Yes, of course, I suffer all the temptations. But God has given me a thorn in the flesh. A football injury from high school.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1989 | PAT H. BROESKE
Angered by what he sees as the lack of "uplifting and inspirational" Hollywood movies, a nationally known television and radio minister says he is going to lead his flock into the film business. Dr. D. James Kennedy, whose Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church is based in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., cited Martin Scorsese's "The Last Temptation of Christ" as the catalyst in his decision to use his ministry to make the kinds of movies Hollywood won't.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1989 | From Religious News Service
U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, who has been sharply criticized by many of his fellow evangelical Christians for his positions on AIDS, has struck back in an interview in the June issue of Charisma & Christian Life. The 72-year-old Presbyterian, who will leave his federal post Oct. 1, specifically criticized positions taken by James Dobson, president of the Pomona-based Focus on the Family, and the Rev. D. James Kennedy, a prominent television preacher and outgoing moderator of the Presbyterian Church in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1999 | Associated Press
Leaders of evangelical Protestantism, who rarely speak with one voice, have issued a joint statement of doctrine reaffirming the evangelical belief that Jesus Christ "is the only way of salvation." "The Bible offers no hope that sincere worshipers of other religions will be saved without personal faith in Jesus Christ," said the statement, which seeks to define what unites the movement and what distinguishes it from other forms of Christianity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1999
Howard Rosenberg's column on the documentary "It's Elementary: Talking About Gay Issues in School" has given me reason 1,692 on why I don't have a TV in my house and reason 4,395 on why my four children go to parochial school ("Debating Gay Issues in School and on the Air," April 2). Teaching about homosexuality has no place on TV or in school. My children need no education on gays, gay sex or for that matter sex in general. They don't need any education on homosexuality to know that anti-gay violence is wrong, or that teasing a child with two moms is wrong.
NEWS
March 28, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
With about 220,000 households tuning in each morning to 126 stations throughout the United States, the "Jim and Tammy Show" ranked 13th among the nation's most popular religious programs, according to an A. C. Nielsen Co. study conducted in November. The most popular religious television program is either Robert Schuller's "Hour of Power" or Jimmy Swaggart's gospel hour, depending upon the rating service, followed by Oral Roberts' 30-minute "Expect a Miracle."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988 | From Religious News Service
A Presbyterian minister who favors an emphasis on church growth and evangelism has been elected moderator of the 200th General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). The Rev. C. Kenneth Hall, 63, pastor of Hill United Presbyterian Church in Butler, Pa., was elected moderator, or chief spokesman, on the first ballot with 319 votes--three more than the required 316 for a majority of 630 commissioners. Hall defeated four other candidates, including the Rev. Juventino R.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1989 | PAT H. BROESKE
Angered by what he sees as the lack of "uplifting and inspirational" Hollywood movies, a nationally known television and radio minister says he is going to lead his flock into the film business. Dr. D. James Kennedy, whose Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church is based in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., cited Martin Scorsese's "The Last Temptation of Christ" as the catalyst in his decision to use his ministry to make the kinds of movies Hollywood won't.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The murderous rampage this week at a Texas Baptist church exemplified rising hostility toward Christians in America and abroad--and an inexplicable reluctance to recognize the shooting as a religious hate crime, national evangelical leaders said Friday. From Jerry Falwell to Pat Robertson, James Dobson and D. James Kennedy, conservative Christian leaders uniformly decried what they called a double standard in treating Christian victims of violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997 | ADELLE M. BANKS, RELIGION NEWS SERVICE
Judge Roy S. Moore, the Alabama jurist who is locked in a legal struggle to keep a handcrafted replica of the Ten Commandments on his courtroom wall, said he is at the center of a debate about Americans' acknowledgment of God. "The issue is . . . ripe," Moore said. "The issue of the acknowledgment of God in this country is at a point which . . . there must be a decision made. Are we still one nation under God? Do we still acknowledge a higher law?"
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