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Da Vinci Code

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2010 | By Carla Hall
Julia Boles, 46, lives in Arcadia with her lawyer husband and their nine children, ages 5 to 20. She also manages to attend Mass daily, set aside two times a day for prayer and, with her children, pray the rosary. "People say, 'Nine kids? How do you handle that and go to Mass?' I say, 'How could I do this without the Mass?' " Boles is a member of one of the most talked about, least understood Catholic organizations in the world: Opus Dei, which means "work of God" in Latin.
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HOME & GARDEN
February 10, 2010 | By Lauren Beale
Actor-producer-director Tom Hanks has purchased the contemporary Pacific Palisades home of veteran producers Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall, according to area real estate agents. The sales price was listed at slightly more than $26 million at Blockshopper.com, a news and market data service. Property records show that the 14,513-square-foot house, built in 1996, has four bedrooms and five bathrooms. Hanks did not respond to requests for comment. Hanks, 53, won Oscars for his work in "Forrest Gump" (1994)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2010
Where you've seen him Paul Bettany is perhaps best known for his two films with Russell Crowe, "A Beautiful Mind" and "Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World." For "Master and Commander," his honors include a British Academy of Film and Television Arts nomination and supporting actor laurels from the London Film Critics Circle; for "A Beautiful Mind," he shared a Screen Actors Guild ensemble nomination. He has also been honored for performances in small British films such as "Gangster No. 1" and "The Heart of Me," as well as "Wimbledon" and "The Secret Life of Bees."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010
You should always talk about: Ricky Gervais. Start by watching tonight's Golden Globes, where he will preside over Hollywood's booziest party. Then go and buy yourself a DVD copy of "The Invention of Lying," one of last year's most underrated comedies, about an alternative world in which everyone tells the truth. (Tuesday) Oh yes, you will want to talk about: the new season of "24." Why? You will want to know why I say that the birth of Jacqueline Bauer is a thrilling revelation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2010 | By Sarah Kaufman
Is the world about to gain another Leonardo da Vinci painting? The multitasking Renaissance genius who produced the most famous portrait in the world -- Mona somebody -- left us only 10 to 20 other paintings. Yet if current whispers bear out about a picture in Boston, that number may increase by one more. Art experts say it's the equivalent of stumbling upon a surprise Shakespeare play or a lost Homeric epic. At this point, we have only a tantalizing mystery -- perhaps the unspooling of a new Da Vinci code -- dangling on the slender thread of secrets and a handful of clues that emerged last week: The Washington Post receives a tip from a source who wishes to remain anonymous that the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston has in its possession a painting believed to be by the Italian master, and is in the process of authenticating it. Were it deemed a true Leonardo, such a painting would be only the second one in all the Americas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2009 | Scott Martelle
This is how a writer knows his books have grabbed the full attention of mainstream American culture. By the time Dan Brown's "The Lost Symbol," his first novel since 2003's "The Da Vinci Code," lands on bookstore shelves Tuesday, pre-orders will have kept it at or near the top of Amazon's bestseller list for the last 148 days. On Sunday, Parade magazine published a selection from "The Lost Symbol," the first time it has excerpted a novel in its 68-year history. Beginning last Tuesday, in a marketing merger between publisher Doubleday and NBC, "Today" show co-host Matt Lauer unveiled a clue a day about the closely guarded plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2009 | Nick Owchar
The wait is over. "The Lost Symbol," the follow-up to Dan Brown's 2003 mega-seller, "The Da Vinci Code," is here -- and you don't have to be a Freemason to enjoy it (although it wouldn't hurt). Like "Angels and Demons," published in 2000, and "The Da Vinci Code," "The Lost Symbol" solves puzzles, analyzes paintings and reveals forgotten histories -- all so that Brown's tireless hero, Robert Langdon, can find a legendary Masonic treasure despite special ops squads that are dogging him and a bizarre killer who has kidnapped his dear friend and mentor.
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