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Daedalus

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2003 | Mel Gilden, Special to The Times
At lunchtime, Herman and his friend Peggy watched the sky while they ate. "It's a Daedalus," Herman cried. "My favorite." "Are you sure?" Peggy asked as she squinted at the fast-moving spot in the sky. "I'm sure," Herman said. "If there's one thing I know about, it's flying cars." Peggy sighed. "Every family has one except mine," she said. "We're still creeping along on the ground." "My family doesn't have one either," Herman reminded her. After lunch, Herman couldn't wait to tell his teacher.
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SCIENCE
September 24, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
In what may well be one of the last aviation firsts, a University of Toronto graduate student has fulfilled an ancient dream that dates back at least to the Greek legend of Daedalus and Icarus — human-powered flight. In an ungainly wing-flapping craft, or ornithopter, built by students at the university, Todd Reichert made history last month by sustaining both altitude and airspeed for 19.3 seconds, traveling a little more than 145 yards at an average speed of about 16 mph. The flight, conducted at sunrise Aug. 2 at the Great Lakes Gliding Club in Tottenham, Ontario, was witnessed by a vice president of the Federation Aeronautique Internationale, which certifies aviation records.
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NEWS
April 10, 1986 | United Press International
Scientists, attempting to accomplish in reality what Daedalus did in myth, said Wednesday that they are trying to build an aircraft powered solely by human energy and fly it 69 miles from Crete to the Greek mainland.
BOOKS
May 18, 2008 | Denise Hamilton, Denise Hamilton is editor of the anthology "Los Angeles Noir" and author of the forthcoming novel "The Last Embrace," set in 1949 Hollywood.
GREEK myths have long inspired storytellers, but it took author Rick Riordan to bring them roaring to life for the middle-school crowd with his action-packed, wisecracking "Percy Jackson and the Olympians" series. It began with 2005's "The Lightning Thief," in which 12-year-old Percy, a hyperactive New York boy with dyslexia who lives with a single mother, learns that his absent father is Poseidon, the Greek god of the sea.
SCIENCE
September 24, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
In what may well be one of the last aviation firsts, a University of Toronto graduate student has fulfilled an ancient dream that dates back at least to the Greek legend of Daedalus and Icarus — human-powered flight. In an ungainly wing-flapping craft, or ornithopter, built by students at the university, Todd Reichert made history last month by sustaining both altitude and airspeed for 19.3 seconds, traveling a little more than 145 yards at an average speed of about 16 mph. The flight, conducted at sunrise Aug. 2 at the Great Lakes Gliding Club in Tottenham, Ontario, was witnessed by a vice president of the Federation Aeronautique Internationale, which certifies aviation records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1988 | From Reuters
High winds on Saturday forced pilot Greg Zack, 26, of Lexington, Ky., to cancel his bid for a world flight record aboard the human-powered Daedalus light aircraft. The next attempt will probably be on Monday, flight engineers said.
BOOKS
November 24, 1985 | RICHARD EDER
"World's Fair" is E. L. Doctorow's portrait of the artist as a young child. The author's alter-ego, Edgar Altschuler, grows into an awareness that the world stretches far beyond the protective confines of a Bronx Jewish household. It was a quieter passage than Stephen Daedalus' vehement breakout from a constricted Dublin youth, and conducted with far greater cautiousness.
BOOKS
August 19, 1990 | Bart Everett, Everett is an assistant Times systems editor and a commercial pilot
On April 24, 1988, a Greek athlete pedaled a super-lightweight airplane 70 miles across the Aegean Sea from Crete to Santorini in the longest human-powered flight in history. The fragile craft disintegrated at its destination and, similarly, the crew that launched it scattered like broken glass. Gary Dorsey reconstructs both for us in a narrative remarkable for its insights as well as its omissions.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
It looked like a sequel to "Revenge of the Nerds." "Faster! Pick it up!" the gawky MIT aeronautical engineering student barked at the panting athlete he had strapped into a computerized exercise contraption. While one grimaced, the other smiled slightly and punched buttons on a calculator. What looked like like torture, though, was really teamwork. The nerds and the jocks have united in this high desert town, and if all goes well, they'll achieve something neither could do alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly 500 years, admirers have wondered what Leonardo da Vinci was thinking when he bestowed that unforgettable trace of a smile on Mona Lisa. It is hard to imagine an explanation stranger or more fanciful than the one David Davalos concocts in his play, "Daedalus." The curious can check out a staged reading of "Daedalus" tonight at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2003 | Mel Gilden, Special to The Times
At lunchtime, Herman and his friend Peggy watched the sky while they ate. "It's a Daedalus," Herman cried. "My favorite." "Are you sure?" Peggy asked as she squinted at the fast-moving spot in the sky. "I'm sure," Herman said. "If there's one thing I know about, it's flying cars." Peggy sighed. "Every family has one except mine," she said. "We're still creeping along on the ground." "My family doesn't have one either," Herman reminded her. After lunch, Herman couldn't wait to tell his teacher.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly 500 years, admirers have wondered what Leonardo da Vinci was thinking when he bestowed that unforgettable trace of a smile on Mona Lisa. It is hard to imagine an explanation stranger or more fanciful than the one David Davalos concocts in his play, "Daedalus." The curious can check out a staged reading of "Daedalus" tonight at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa.
BOOKS
August 19, 1990 | Bart Everett, Everett is an assistant Times systems editor and a commercial pilot
On April 24, 1988, a Greek athlete pedaled a super-lightweight airplane 70 miles across the Aegean Sea from Crete to Santorini in the longest human-powered flight in history. The fragile craft disintegrated at its destination and, similarly, the crew that launched it scattered like broken glass. Gary Dorsey reconstructs both for us in a narrative remarkable for its insights as well as its omissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1988 | From Reuters
High winds on Saturday forced pilot Greg Zack, 26, of Lexington, Ky., to cancel his bid for a world flight record aboard the human-powered Daedalus light aircraft. The next attempt will probably be on Monday, flight engineers said.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
It looked like a sequel to "Revenge of the Nerds." "Faster! Pick it up!" the gawky MIT aeronautical engineering student barked at the panting athlete he had strapped into a computerized exercise contraption. While one grimaced, the other smiled slightly and punched buttons on a calculator. What looked like like torture, though, was really teamwork. The nerds and the jocks have united in this high desert town, and if all goes well, they'll achieve something neither could do alone.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | United Press International
Scientists, attempting to accomplish in reality what Daedalus did in myth, said Wednesday that they are trying to build an aircraft powered solely by human energy and fly it 69 miles from Crete to the Greek mainland.
BOOKS
May 18, 2008 | Denise Hamilton, Denise Hamilton is editor of the anthology "Los Angeles Noir" and author of the forthcoming novel "The Last Embrace," set in 1949 Hollywood.
GREEK myths have long inspired storytellers, but it took author Rick Riordan to bring them roaring to life for the middle-school crowd with his action-packed, wisecracking "Percy Jackson and the Olympians" series. It began with 2005's "The Lightning Thief," in which 12-year-old Percy, a hyperactive New York boy with dyslexia who lives with a single mother, learns that his absent father is Poseidon, the Greek god of the sea.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2002 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
Donna Tartt is a small, tightly wrapped package. Her arms are folded over a black, double-breasted jacket buttoned to the neck; her legs are crossed in a long black skirt, revealing a bit of black hose that quickly disappears into a medium heeled black shoe. Her dark hair is equally severe, bobbed to frame her face, which she frequently turns away even while talking to you. Her skin shows no sign of having seen sun; her eyes are green and ethereal, like light through a stained glass window.
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