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Daewoo Group

BUSINESS
February 12, 1990 | KELLY TUNNEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The national best seller is written by the founder of one of South Korea's largest conglomerates, an unabashed workaholic who says he shaves and eats breakfast in his car to save time. Kim Woo-choong heads Daewoo Group, maker of products ranging from Leading Edge computers to Pontiac LeMans exports to the U.S. market. Kim says he wrote the book to tell young people how to find inspiration and direction in life. Or as the suggested title for the English version suggests, "Work!!!"
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BUSINESS
November 6, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
After a year of abstinence, Kim Woo Choong, the founder and chairman of the Daewoo Group, has started smoking again. "I quit until all our labor trouble broke out," said the 51-year-old entrepreneur who turned the tiny textile exporting firm that he co-founded with $9,000 in borrowed cash in 1967 into a $10-billion conglomerate. In a two-hour, 45-minute interview, however, labor strife was the only problem Kim cited for his group of companies or for South Korea.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1987 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
The first proverb Hyo Bion Im says he learned in English was the one that says when in Rome to do as the Romans do. Now that he's in Newbury Park, he says, he plans to do as the folks do here. Im is the man the $8 billion-a-year South Korean industrial conglomerate Daewoo Group sent to the Conejo Valley community to run Cordata Technologies, a 6-year-old maker of IBM-compatible personal computers and laser printers that Daewoo controls.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1987 | JAMES BATES
Hyo-Bin Im, an executive with the South Korean conglomerate Daewoo, was named chief executive of Cordata Technologies, a Thousand Oaks maker of IBM-compatible personal computers. The move, industry analysts said, is a further sign that Daewoo is taking control of Cordata's operations. Daewoo has been majority shareholder in the private company since late 1985. Im, 44, had been executive managing director of the planning and coordination division of Daewoo Group in Seoul.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1985
The Thousand Oaks-based maker of personal computers, printers and related products said it received more than $20 million from Daewoo Group, a Korean conglomerate that manufactures some of Corona's equipment. Corona, which has long sought new financing, did not disclose how much of a stake it sold to Daewoo. Corona also said it will change its name in January to Cordata to help overcome its image as an IBM "PC clone" manufacturer.
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