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Dagestan

NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- President Obama spoke on the phone Friday with President Vladimir Putin of Russia as U.S. officials scrambled to track the movements of the suspected Boston Marathon bombers. In the evening conversation, Obama praised the "close cooperation that the United States has received from Russia on counter-terrorism, including in the wake of the Boston attack," White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said in a written statement. The call came during an intense Boston-area manhunt for 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a suspect in the bombing, and as a broader investigation spread into whether there may have been collaborators in the U.S. or abroad.
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WORLD
October 21, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Investigators were delving into the background of a woman from the restive Caucasus region who is believed to have set off a suicide bomb Monday aboard a crowded bus in the southern Russian city of Volgograd. Six passengers and the bomber were killed and 33 people were injured. It was the latest instance of violence from the Caucasus, fueled by nationalism and Islamic extremism, spilling over into other parts of Russia. Authorities identified the bomber as Naida Asiyalova, 30, a resident of the Russian republic of Dagestan.
SPORTS
April 20, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
The Bruins and the Red Sox, Boston-based professional sports teams with home games that had been scheduled for Friday, postponed competition as authorities searched for and apprehended a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings. Regional rail and bus systems were closed part of the day after Gov. Deval Patrick urged residents of Boston and nearby areas to avoid going out in public. Many fans use mass transit to attend hockey games at TD Garden and watch the Red Sox at Fenway Park.
WORLD
April 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Russian authorities said Friday that 140 people had been detained in southern Moscow on suspicion of involvement in an Islamic extremist organization, according to the state news agency. The Federal Security Agency said at least 30 of the suspects were citizens of other countries and some had ties to militants in the northern Caucasus, the state news agency, RIA Novosti, reported. It did not say which countries the detainees were from. The roundup came after two brothers of Chechen descent who grew up in Kyrgyzstan and Dagestan were named as suspects in the April 15 Boston Marathon bombings, which killed three people and wounded hundreds of others.
WORLD
April 23, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Suspected Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev was already a citizen of two other countries when he applied for a U.S. passport that was delayed because of charges of domestic violence. The older of the two brothers suspected in the attack last Monday used a passport issued by Kyrgyzstan, a former Soviet republic where he and his family once lived, for international travel, according to his mother. And he was also a Russian citizen. When he returned to Russia from the United States in early 2012 to visit his father in Dagestan, a Russian republic in the North Caucasus region, he applied for a Russian internal passport to replace one he reported as lost.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian and Matt Pearce, Los Angeles Times
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, one of two brothers accused of bombing the Boston Marathon, told investigators that the pair had originally planned to mount an attack on the Fourth of July, a U.S. counter-terrorism official said Thursday. Meanwhile, another counter-terrorism official said that Russian intelligence officials believe Tsarnaev's older brother, Tamerlan, may have met with militants while visiting Russia in 2012. Authorities have scoured the background of the 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev for potential sources of radicalization in the years leading up to the bombings that left three people dead and more than 260 others wounded.
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
At 15, Israil Mirzakhanov was at a crossroads: He could stay home in the Caucasus region, where several of his friends already had been taken from their homes and had turned up dead in the street. Or he could take his chances with the rampant discrimination in Moscow. Four years later, now a tall and fit-looking college student, he becomes something of a pariah when he steps out on the snowy streets of the capital. He tries not to look people in the eyes because he knows what he'll see. Fear.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2013 | By David Horsey
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the younger of the two brothers accused of perpetrating the Boston Marathon bombing, is the baffling mystery man in this crime. His older brother, Tamerlan, who died in a shootout with police in the dark early hours Friday morning, better fits the stereotype of a disaffected, nascent terrorist. He was nearing adulthood when he came to this country from Russia's predominantly Muslim central Asian region. He talked of having no American friends. He had openly disdained the immorality of American society and adopted a zealous brand of Islam.
WORLD
April 13, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The last time Patimat Magomedova saw her daughter, she was puttering around the house, manicuring her nails and using henna to dye her hair bright red. It's high time we take care of the garden, the mother remembers Mariyam Sharipova saying that Friday. Let's plant raspberries, cucumbers, greens. And we have to do something about the kitchen, maybe get some pretty new dishes. By evening, the young woman had vanished from the house in this remote mountain village in the Russian republic of Dagestan.
OPINION
March 31, 2010 | By Rajan Menon
The suicide bombings of two Moscow subway stations that killed 39 people Monday appear to have emanated from a place that few people could find on a map: Russia's North Caucasus region, a sliver of land wedged between the Black and Caspian seas that is home to 7 million people. Russian czars annexed the North Caucasus in the latter part of the 19th century after wars that lasted several decades, but the people in the region were reluctant Russians. No sooner did the Soviet colossus start wobbling than the region, particularly the breakaway republic of Chechnya, descended into chaos.
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