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Dagestan

NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Jon Healey
The events in Boston on Friday -- the gun battle that left one suspect in the marathon bombings dead, the ensuing manhunt for the second suspect -- filled the news pipeline, yet in the most unsatisfying way. For three days, all we wanted to know was who could have been so cruel as to place shrapnel-filled homemade bombs in the midst of a crowd of unsuspecting people. Then, within hours of the FBI posting pictures from surveillance cameras at the scene, we knew the names of two suspects: 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his 19-year-old brother, Dzhokhar.
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NATIONAL
January 24, 2014 | By David Horsey
Vladimir Putin wanted to bring the Olympics to Russia, and he wanted them to take place in his favorite Black Sea resort town, Sochi, even though it is not a locale that sees much, if any, snow and is situated dangerously close to a region roiling with rebels and terrorists who hate Putin. Snow will not be a problem. Enough white stuff can be manufactured to cover a ski slope, if need be. But keeping terrorists from blowing up the Olympics is a bit more difficult. A new video released by radical Islamist separatists in Russia's Dagestan region promises that attacks are coming.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2013 | By Kim Murphy and Sergei L. Loiko
BOSTON - The parents of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev said Saturday they have no immediate plans to travel to the U.S., in part because of the mother's fears she is also under suspicion. “They are now thinking that I am a terrorist, that is what I have been hearing. So I don't know how safe it is for me to go down there,” Zubeidat Tsarnaeva told the Los Angeles Times in a telephone interview in Russia. “I need guarantees that I will be allowed to see my son, if he is still alive that is. I am thinking about abandoning U.S. citizenship altogether,” she said.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Richard A. Serrano and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Investigators said the two Boston Marathon bombs were triggered by long-range remote controls for toy cars - a more sophisticated design than originally believed - bolstering a theory that the older suspect received bomb-making guidance on his six-month trip to Russia last year. Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who died in a shootout with police last week, "more than likely got some instruction in Dagestan," a federal law enforcement official said Wednesday. The official said investigators continued to believe that Tsarnaev, 26, and his brother, Dzhokhar, 19, were radicalized in the U.S., and that no foreign terrorist group orchestrated the plot.
OPINION
March 31, 2010 | By Rajan Menon
The suicide bombings of two Moscow subway stations that killed 39 people Monday appear to have emanated from a place that few people could find on a map: Russia's North Caucasus region, a sliver of land wedged between the Black and Caspian seas that is home to 7 million people. Russian czars annexed the North Caucasus in the latter part of the 19th century after wars that lasted several decades, but the people in the region were reluctant Russians. No sooner did the Soviet colossus start wobbling than the region, particularly the breakaway republic of Chechnya, descended into chaos.
WORLD
January 19, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - President Vladimir Putin said Russian authorities will "do our best" to prevent terrorist attacks at the Sochi Winter Olympics, which will take place in the shadow of an Islamist insurgency in the restive Caucasus region. "We have a perfect understanding of the scope of the threat and how to deal with it and how to prevent it," Putin said in an interview broadcast Sunday. "I hope that our law enforcement agencies will deal with it with honor and dignity, the way it was during other major sports and political events.
OPINION
February 6, 2011 | By Charles King and Rajan Menon
If current demographic trends continue, within the next half-century Muslims will constitute a sizable part, perhaps even a plurality, of Russia's population; indeed, Moscow currently has more Muslim inhabitants than any other European city. And unlike those in Amsterdam or Paris, most of Moscow's Muslims are citizens, not immigrants ? products of the Russian Empire's 19th century southward expansion. In the coming decades, Muslim peoples from Russia's North Caucasus and Volga regions, together with migrants from neighboring Central Asia and Azerbaijan, will continue to displace Russia's Slavic core and reshape how the country defines itself.
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
At 15, Israil Mirzakhanov was at a crossroads: He could stay home in the Caucasus region, where several of his friends already had been taken from their homes and had turned up dead in the street. Or he could take his chances with the rampant discrimination in Moscow. Four years later, now a tall and fit-looking college student, he becomes something of a pariah when he steps out on the snowy streets of the capital. He tries not to look people in the eyes because he knows what he'll see. Fear.
WORLD
September 10, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A suicide bomber detonated explosives packed into a car outside a busy market in the volatile North Caucasus region Thursday, killing at least 16 people and injuring more than 100, officials said. The blast in Vladikavkaz occurred just before noon, when market activity was at its peak. A slow-moving sedan pulled up near the market's front gate and exploded, overturning cars and kiosks, and shattering windows in nearby houses, said Samir Sabatkoyev, spokesman for the Interior Ministry of Russia's North Ossetia republic.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- Accused Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has told FBI investigators that he and his brother were operating alone and did not receive assistance from outside terrorist groups, officials said Tuesday. A team of federal agents peppered the 19-year-old with questions about the Boston Marathon bombing plot on Monday shortly before a federal magistrate read the charges against him and gave him the “Miranda warning" informing him of his constitutional right against self-incrimination.
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