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Dagestan

WORLD
April 13, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The last time Patimat Magomedova saw her daughter, she was puttering around the house, manicuring her nails and using henna to dye her hair bright red. It's high time we take care of the garden, the mother remembers Mariyam Sharipova saying that Friday. Let's plant raspberries, cucumbers, greens. And we have to do something about the kitchen, maybe get some pretty new dishes. By evening, the young woman had vanished from the house in this remote mountain village in the Russian republic of Dagestan.
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NATIONAL
April 24, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Richard A. Serrano and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Investigators said the two Boston Marathon bombs were triggered by long-range remote controls for toy cars - a more sophisticated design than originally believed - bolstering a theory that the older suspect received bomb-making guidance on his six-month trip to Russia last year. Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who died in a shootout with police last week, "more than likely got some instruction in Dagestan," a federal law enforcement official said Wednesday. The official said investigators continued to believe that Tsarnaev, 26, and his brother, Dzhokhar, 19, were radicalized in the U.S., and that no foreign terrorist group orchestrated the plot.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Jon Healey
The events in Boston on Friday -- the gun battle that left one suspect in the marathon bombings dead, the ensuing manhunt for the second suspect -- filled the news pipeline, yet in the most unsatisfying way. For three days, all we wanted to know was who could have been so cruel as to place shrapnel-filled homemade bombs in the midst of a crowd of unsuspecting people. Then, within hours of the FBI posting pictures from surveillance cameras at the scene, we knew the names of two suspects: 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his 19-year-old brother, Dzhokhar.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Brothers and Boston Marathon bombing suspects  Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will be the focus of a major new biography by Russian American scholar and journalist Masha Gessen. Riverhead will publish the as-yet-untitled book. Gessen is the author, most recently, of "The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin. " Like the Tsarnaevs, she moved to the Boston area when she was a Russian-speaking teen; she returned to Russia in her 20s to live and work there. As a journalist, she covered the war in Chechnya, the Tsarnaevs' country of origin.
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | By David Wharton
Worrisome stories are nothing new in the days before the Olympic Games. There are often complaints about the cost of preparations and concerns about how the host city will perform. But the 2014 Sochi Games have attracted an unusual amount of negative publicity, and the bad news continued Thursday. A top U.S. intelligence official told the Senate Intelligence Committee that there has been an increase in reports of security threats against the Olympics, specifically for areas on the perimeter of the competition venues.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2014 | By David Horsey
Vladimir Putin wanted to bring the Olympics to Russia, and he wanted them to take place in his favorite Black Sea resort town, Sochi, even though it is not a locale that sees much, if any, snow and is situated dangerously close to a region roiling with rebels and terrorists who hate Putin. Snow will not be a problem. Enough white stuff can be manufactured to cover a ski slope, if need be. But keeping terrorists from blowing up the Olympics is a bit more difficult. A new video released by radical Islamist separatists in Russia's Dagestan region promises that attacks are coming.
OPINION
March 31, 2010 | By Rajan Menon
The suicide bombings of two Moscow subway stations that killed 39 people Monday appear to have emanated from a place that few people could find on a map: Russia's North Caucasus region, a sliver of land wedged between the Black and Caspian seas that is home to 7 million people. Russian czars annexed the North Caucasus in the latter part of the 19th century after wars that lasted several decades, but the people in the region were reluctant Russians. No sooner did the Soviet colossus start wobbling than the region, particularly the breakaway republic of Chechnya, descended into chaos.
OPINION
February 6, 2011 | By Charles King and Rajan Menon
If current demographic trends continue, within the next half-century Muslims will constitute a sizable part, perhaps even a plurality, of Russia's population; indeed, Moscow currently has more Muslim inhabitants than any other European city. And unlike those in Amsterdam or Paris, most of Moscow's Muslims are citizens, not immigrants ? products of the Russian Empire's 19th century southward expansion. In the coming decades, Muslim peoples from Russia's North Caucasus and Volga regions, together with migrants from neighboring Central Asia and Azerbaijan, will continue to displace Russia's Slavic core and reshape how the country defines itself.
WORLD
September 10, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A suicide bomber detonated explosives packed into a car outside a busy market in the volatile North Caucasus region Thursday, killing at least 16 people and injuring more than 100, officials said. The blast in Vladikavkaz occurred just before noon, when market activity was at its peak. A slow-moving sedan pulled up near the market's front gate and exploded, overturning cars and kiosks, and shattering windows in nearby houses, said Samir Sabatkoyev, spokesman for the Interior Ministry of Russia's North Ossetia republic.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli, Melanie Mason and Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
BOSTON - As the investigation into the Boston Marathon bombing continued Sunday, family members prepared to bury the victims, and hundreds of stunned and sorrowful residents prayed together for the dead and wounded and worked to reclaim the streets where the violence occurred a week ago. Federal officials had yet to file charges against 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was captured Friday and remains in serious condition under heavy guard at...
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