Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDagestan
IN THE NEWS

Dagestan

ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Brothers and Boston Marathon bombing suspects  Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will be the focus of a major new biography by Russian American scholar and journalist Masha Gessen. Riverhead will publish the as-yet-untitled book. Gessen is the author, most recently, of "The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin. " Like the Tsarnaevs, she moved to the Boston area when she was a Russian-speaking teen; she returned to Russia in her 20s to live and work there. As a journalist, she covered the war in Chechnya, the Tsarnaevs' country of origin.
Advertisement
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | By David Wharton
Worrisome stories are nothing new in the days before the Olympic Games. There are often complaints about the cost of preparations and concerns about how the host city will perform. But the 2014 Sochi Games have attracted an unusual amount of negative publicity, and the bad news continued Thursday. A top U.S. intelligence official told the Senate Intelligence Committee that there has been an increase in reports of security threats against the Olympics, specifically for areas on the perimeter of the competition venues.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2014 | By David Horsey
Vladimir Putin wanted to bring the Olympics to Russia, and he wanted them to take place in his favorite Black Sea resort town, Sochi, even though it is not a locale that sees much, if any, snow and is situated dangerously close to a region roiling with rebels and terrorists who hate Putin. Snow will not be a problem. Enough white stuff can be manufactured to cover a ski slope, if need be. But keeping terrorists from blowing up the Olympics is a bit more difficult. A new video released by radical Islamist separatists in Russia's Dagestan region promises that attacks are coming.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2013 | By Kim Murphy and Sergei L. Loiko
BOSTON - The parents of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev said Saturday they have no immediate plans to travel to the U.S., in part because of the mother's fears she is also under suspicion. “They are now thinking that I am a terrorist, that is what I have been hearing. So I don't know how safe it is for me to go down there,” Zubeidat Tsarnaeva told the Los Angeles Times in a telephone interview in Russia. “I need guarantees that I will be allowed to see my son, if he is still alive that is. I am thinking about abandoning U.S. citizenship altogether,” she said.
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
At 15, Israil Mirzakhanov was at a crossroads: He could stay home in the Caucasus region, where several of his friends already had been taken from their homes and had turned up dead in the street. Or he could take his chances with the rampant discrimination in Moscow. Four years later, now a tall and fit-looking college student, he becomes something of a pariah when he steps out on the snowy streets of the capital. He tries not to look people in the eyes because he knows what he'll see. Fear.
WORLD
September 10, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A suicide bomber detonated explosives packed into a car outside a busy market in the volatile North Caucasus region Thursday, killing at least 16 people and injuring more than 100, officials said. The blast in Vladikavkaz occurred just before noon, when market activity was at its peak. A slow-moving sedan pulled up near the market's front gate and exploded, overturning cars and kiosks, and shattering windows in nearby houses, said Samir Sabatkoyev, spokesman for the Interior Ministry of Russia's North Ossetia republic.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- Accused Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has told FBI investigators that he and his brother were operating alone and did not receive assistance from outside terrorist groups, officials said Tuesday. A team of federal agents peppered the 19-year-old with questions about the Boston Marathon bombing plot on Monday shortly before a federal magistrate read the charges against him and gave him the “Miranda warning" informing him of his constitutional right against self-incrimination.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2013 | By David Horsey
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the younger of the two brothers accused of perpetrating the Boston Marathon bombing, is the baffling mystery man in this crime. His older brother, Tamerlan, who died in a shootout with police in the dark early hours Friday morning, better fits the stereotype of a disaffected, nascent terrorist. He was nearing adulthood when he came to this country from Russia's predominantly Muslim central Asian region. He talked of having no American friends. He had openly disdained the immorality of American society and adopted a zealous brand of Islam.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Shashank Bengali and Matea Gold, Los Angeles Times
BOSTON - During their decade in the United States, the two brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombings had acquired many of the preoccupations of young American men - cars, sports, social media. But Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, whose family fled Russia's troubled Caucasus region, showed signs of alienation from the country that had embraced them as refugees. "I don't have a single American friend, I don't understand them," Tamerlan said, as reported in an online photo essay that shows him training for a boxing competition that he hoped would lead to a place on the U.S. Olympic team and naturalized citizenship.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli, Melanie Mason and Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
BOSTON - As the investigation into the Boston Marathon bombing continued Sunday, family members prepared to bury the victims, and hundreds of stunned and sorrowful residents prayed together for the dead and wounded and worked to reclaim the streets where the violence occurred a week ago. Federal officials had yet to file charges against 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was captured Friday and remains in serious condition under heavy guard at...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|