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Dagoberto Gilb

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The writer Dagoberto Gilb is a believer in the literature of the American West and in the literature of the Latino United States. He'd prefer not to read any more novels that portray Latino people as stereotypical criminals and bumpkins. His own work - half a dozen books, including short story collections and novels - is a ferocious riposte to those writers and editors who perpetuate a one-dimensional vision of the Latino U.S. Now Gilb is going to bat for Western and Latino lit in a new literary magazine called Huizache that he's started with the help of the Centro Victoria for Mexican Literature, based at the South Texas campus of the University of Houston-Victoria.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The writer Dagoberto Gilb is a believer in the literature of the American West and in the literature of the Latino United States. He'd prefer not to read any more novels that portray Latino people as stereotypical criminals and bumpkins. His own work - half a dozen books, including short story collections and novels - is a ferocious riposte to those writers and editors who perpetuate a one-dimensional vision of the Latino U.S. Now Gilb is going to bat for Western and Latino lit in a new literary magazine called Huizache that he's started with the help of the Centro Victoria for Mexican Literature, based at the South Texas campus of the University of Houston-Victoria.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Before the End, After the Beginning Dagoberto Gilb Grove Press: 194 pp., $24 At a writing program conference in 2008, I saw Dagoberto Gilb speak on a panel. Among the rumpled graduate students and overtired teachers, he looked like a fiftysomething Javier Bardem, long-faced handsome with a confident swagger. He appeared to be anything but the type of person who would suffer a stroke about a year later, but that's exactly what happened. "Before the End, After the Beginning" is a collection of stories written mostly after the stroke, and it serves as a reckoning.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Before the End, After the Beginning Dagoberto Gilb Grove Press: 194 pp., $24 At a writing program conference in 2008, I saw Dagoberto Gilb speak on a panel. Among the rumpled graduate students and overtired teachers, he looked like a fiftysomething Javier Bardem, long-faced handsome with a confident swagger. He appeared to be anything but the type of person who would suffer a stroke about a year later, but that's exactly what happened. "Before the End, After the Beginning" is a collection of stories written mostly after the stroke, and it serves as a reckoning.
BOOKS
December 11, 1994 | Luis J. Rodriguez, Luis J. Rodriguez is an author of poetry, fiction and nonfiction. Formerly of Los Angeles, he is now based in Chicago
As most readers know, good fiction is often like good conversation. Chismes. Bromas. Mentiras. Scuttlebutt. Jokes. Lies. When a little bit of art is applied--including full-bodied characters, intriguing and original dialogue, well-layered story lines, and whatever poetry one can possess--this can be dangerous on the dance floor. Dagoberto Gilb's novel "The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acuna" is good talk throughout. It feels like a beer-joint seance. Like a coffee klatch.
MAGAZINE
November 12, 1995 | Lisa Broadwater, Lisa Broadwater is a writer living in Dallas. Her last piece for the magazine was on children's book author William Joyce. and
Don't bother asking author Dagoberto Gilb to talk about himself, because he will--and he will regret it. He will regret it because he will tell you much more than he means to tell you, much more than he probably should tell you, much more than, in the end, you should know. This is a man who has packed a lifetime of hard living into 45 years. A man who has roamed from East Los Angeles to the western tip of Texas, yet who can truly call no single place home. A man who has known desperately hard times and broken more than a few laws.
NEWS
February 12, 2001 | YVETTE DOSS ALBORNOZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a time when a reading by Dagoberto Gilb in Southern California would have drawn only a handful of people, and few others would have recognized his name, despite the fact that he grew up in Los Angeles and had published a book of short fiction based in the city. There was a time not long before the publication of his first book in 1993 when Gilb couldn't get a book publisher's attention, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2008 | Soledad Santiago, Special to The Times
In his varied career, Dagoberto Gilb has given voice to the marginalized and advocated for a more accurate and ample Chicano literary history. Currently a professor in the creative writing program at Texas State University, he is the editor of the weighty "Hecho en Tejas: An Anthology of Texas Mexican Literature" (2006).
MAGAZINE
April 2, 2006
I want to thank you for your in-depth article describing how Taco Bell misrepresents the depth of Mexican cuisine and culture ("Taco Bell Nation," by Dagoberto Gilb, March 19). This essay has given me a theme for my cultural studies class. I plan to write how Pizza Hut misrepresents Italian cuisine as well as how hamburger fast-food restaurants have missed the complex nuances of high German cooking. Paul Meyers Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2008 | Soledad Santiago, Special to The Times
In his varied career, Dagoberto Gilb has given voice to the marginalized and advocated for a more accurate and ample Chicano literary history. Currently a professor in the creative writing program at Texas State University, he is the editor of the weighty "Hecho en Tejas: An Anthology of Texas Mexican Literature" (2006).
NEWS
February 12, 2001 | YVETTE DOSS ALBORNOZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a time when a reading by Dagoberto Gilb in Southern California would have drawn only a handful of people, and few others would have recognized his name, despite the fact that he grew up in Los Angeles and had published a book of short fiction based in the city. There was a time not long before the publication of his first book in 1993 when Gilb couldn't get a book publisher's attention, either.
MAGAZINE
November 12, 1995 | Lisa Broadwater, Lisa Broadwater is a writer living in Dallas. Her last piece for the magazine was on children's book author William Joyce. and
Don't bother asking author Dagoberto Gilb to talk about himself, because he will--and he will regret it. He will regret it because he will tell you much more than he means to tell you, much more than he probably should tell you, much more than, in the end, you should know. This is a man who has packed a lifetime of hard living into 45 years. A man who has roamed from East Los Angeles to the western tip of Texas, yet who can truly call no single place home. A man who has known desperately hard times and broken more than a few laws.
BOOKS
December 11, 1994 | Luis J. Rodriguez, Luis J. Rodriguez is an author of poetry, fiction and nonfiction. Formerly of Los Angeles, he is now based in Chicago
As most readers know, good fiction is often like good conversation. Chismes. Bromas. Mentiras. Scuttlebutt. Jokes. Lies. When a little bit of art is applied--including full-bodied characters, intriguing and original dialogue, well-layered story lines, and whatever poetry one can possess--this can be dangerous on the dance floor. Dagoberto Gilb's novel "The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acuna" is good talk throughout. It feels like a beer-joint seance. Like a coffee klatch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
If you're stuck in a cell - and in legal limbo - for an undefined period that might be forever, what do you do? You read, of course. The library at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp was established during the Bush administration, in part to allay concerns of human-rights groups about the conditions in the U.S.-run facility, where as many as 700 prisoners have been held since the facility opened in 2002. The prison has been in the news lately because of a hunger strike being conducted by several dozen detainees in protest against their indefinite detention.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
SAN FRANCISCO - You've heard of a pub crawl. Well, in San Francisco, they do a “lit crawl.” The idea is to drag your tipsy self - drunk on either beer, or good metaphors, or both - from bar to bar, or café to café, listening to serious words from serious writers. Over the weekend I attended Lit Crawl in San Francisco, an event held in conjunction with the big, citywide Litquake literary festival. All the events in Lit Crawl were held in on near the city's Mission District.
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