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Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co

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BUSINESS
October 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Drug Firm to Finance UC Project: Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co. said it has agreed in principle to provide $20 million over five years to finance a joint research project on treatments for arteriosclerosis at UC San Francisco. The proposed deal is similar to others made by Japanese companies in an effort to tap American medical expertise.
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BUSINESS
October 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Drug Firm to Finance UC Project: Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co. said it has agreed in principle to provide $20 million over five years to finance a joint research project on treatments for arteriosclerosis at UC San Francisco. The proposed deal is similar to others made by Japanese companies in an effort to tap American medical expertise.
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BUSINESS
May 30, 1996
Allergan Inc. said it has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to market Ocuflox 0.3% for the treatment of corneal ulcers. Allergan said the ophthalmic solution is already indicated for the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis. The company, which develops, manufactures and markets specialty therapeutic products for eye and skin care and neuromuscular disorders, licenses Ocuflox from Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co., in Tokyo, and Santen Pharmaceutical Co., in Osaka, Japan.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2001 | Associated Press
The European Union levied a record $752-million fine against eight chemical and pharmaceutical companies for fixing vitamin prices. The EU executive commission said the firms had been under investigation since 1999 for colluding to eliminate fair competition in vitamin pills and overcharging consumers. The highest fine--$406 million--was for F. Hoffmann-La Roche of Switzerland, which the EU identified as the "prime mover and main beneficiary" of the cartel arrangements.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1999 | Associated Press
Three Japanese companies have agreed to plead guilty and pay $137 million in fines for taking part in a worldwide conspiracy to control the prices of vitamins, the U.S. Justice Department said. "This conspiracy artificially inflated the cost to virtually every American of such everyday necessities as milk, bread, orange juice and cereal, which were fortified with vitamins produced by these companies," said Joel Klein, assistant attorney general in charge of antitrust activities.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2000 | Dow Jones
Irvine eye-care company Allergan Inc. has filed a federal lawsuit against a pharmaceutical company, alleging the company has infringed on Allergan's rights under a license to use another firm's patent. Santen Pharmaceutical Co. said in a press release Thursday that it will "vigorously" defend itself and its subsidiary, Santen Inc., against Allergan's claims.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Roche's U.S. unit and five other vitamin makers will pay $19.6 million to settle Massachusetts consumers' lawsuits that claim the companies conspired to fix vitamin prices for a decade. Hoffmann-La Roche Inc., BASF Corp., Aventis Animal Nutrition, and Japan's Eisai Co., Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co., and Takeda Chemical Industries Ltd. agreed to settle the claims after Massachusetts' highest court ruled state consumer-protection laws could be used to press what amounts to price-fixing claims.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a year of bad publicity and grim budget cuts--and perhaps because of it--donors gave a record $472.3 million to the University of California in the year ending June 30, university officials reported Thursday. UC Irvine, up 13% this year, accounted for part of the jump. Donations to that campus totaled $24.9 million, compared to $21.9 million the year before.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven leading vitamin makers based in Europe and Japan agreed Wednesday to pay a record $1.18 billion to settle allegations that they engaged in a years-long conspiracy to fix prices, inflating the cost of everything from dietary supplements to fortified cereals. Attorneys for the food producers and farming interests who sued the companies said that the agreement marks the biggest class-action antitrust settlement in U.S. history, surpassing a $1.
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