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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000
Speaking of moving dairies ("Central Valley Fights Plans for Giant Dairies," Jan. 3)--remember the book, "Diet for a Small Planet"? The author stated that we should all acquire a taste for soy milk. I didn't think it would become important for me, but the future came faster than I thought it would. The waste from the Chino dairies is already filtering into our ground water in Orange County. I'm sure those people in Bakersfield wouldn't object to a large farm of soybeans, compared to 28,000 gaseous cows.
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HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy
Not milk? Choosing milk for your morning cereal or coffee used to be pretty simple: skim, low-fat or whole. These days, though, market shelves and refrigerators are crowded with an array of alternatives: soy, almond, rice, hemp and more. While some people opt for these beverages because they're vegan, they have allergies or because they're lactose intolerant, the beverages are increasingly popular for another reason too. "We're all being encouraged to eat a more plant-based diet, and some of these products fit that category," says Andrea Giancoli, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and a policy analyst at the Beach Cities Health District Blue Zones Project in Hermosa Beach, an initiative to develop healthier communities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1987
The Regional Water Quality Control Board should be asked to explain why it is so concerned about protecting ground water from the polluting effects of dairy wastes when it has indicated that it would look favorably on the plan to introduce treated human effluent into the San Pasqual Valley above Lake Hodges Reservoir as mitigation for the lowering of ground-water levels due to the construction of Pamo Dam. In its attempt to regulate dairies for...
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- A Siberian dairy plant was temporarily closed Friday after its workers had been found bathing in milk, a Russian consumer oversight agency reported. Trade House Cheeses, a dairy producer in Omsk, about 1,600 miles east of Moscow, was closed for 90 days by regional authorities for an urgent inspection after complaints resulting from photographs and a video posted by one of its employees on a Russian social network. In the photographs and video clips posted on New Year's Eve by worker Artyom Romanov, a group of undressed employees relax in a container of milk as part of their celebration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Kern County judge has refused to throw out the permit for a 28,000-cow dairy project. The controversial Borba dairies still must complete more stringent environmental reviews, but Judge Roger Randall said that doesn't scrap the entire permit approval. Randall ruled earlier that the permit for two dairies approved by county supervisors in July was based on flawed environmental studies. Opponents have said they fear odors and other environmental problems at the dairies.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2010 | By Carol Reiter
Every time a cow dies on a dairy farm, it could cost the owner $115 to have a rendering company pick it up. As a result, many dairies have held on to a long-standing solution: hauling the carcass to a "dead pile" on the backside of the property, where no one can see the dead animals as they decompose. This is the way most beef producers deal with their dead cattle out on the range, where there are few people or water wells. But there are plenty of animals and birds, such as bald eagles and coyotes, that make short work of a dead cow. At dairies, where there are more cattle per acre, dead animals are a major problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1990
In a move that supporters of the Pierce College farm in Woodland Hills fear is the beginning of the end, the college dairy will be closed this summer and milk production classes will end, the school's vice president said Friday. School officials said the dairy was too expensive to maintain given waning student interest in the program. In the spring semester, there were more cows than students, 40 to 16, teachers said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday fined Beranna Dairy of Chino $48,000 for contaminating a tributary of the Santa Ana River with an overflow of cow manure, which violates the Clean Water Act. Federal officials said they believe the contamination never seeped past the Prado Dam in Riverside County and did not reach the Pacific Ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2001 | MARIA ELENA GAONA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Got glass? More than 100 dairies in Southern California once did, selling their milk in glass bottles during the 1950s. Now, that distinction belongs only to Broguiere's Farm Fresh Dairy in Montebello. The dairy, tucked on a quiet street near the edge of town, has been around since 1920 and today serves a niche clientele that appreciates a sip of nostalgia. Customers have a hard time explaining why they prefer milk bottles instead of plastic and carton packaging.
NEWS
December 10, 1989
They rise, like dwarfish versions of the ancient Egyptian pyramids, from the lush, green floor of the Chino valley--mounds of cow manure up to 40 feet high. Smelly blemishes on an otherwise scenic landscape, they represent more than just an aesthetic nuisance. They symbolize what some experts call one of the the most critical water quality problems facing Southern California: pollution of the Chino ground water basin.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2014 | By David Pierson
FALLON, Nev. - The dairy plant with its tangle of stainless steel pipes rises out of the parched landscape here like a beckoning oasis. Perched on the outskirts of this desert town dotted with small churches and roadside casinos, the factory represents a potential lifeline for nearly two dozen nearby dairy farmers. In a few weeks, every drop of milk collected from the surrounding farms will be brought to the plant and converted into fine powder inside a towering heating chamber specially made for the $85-million facility.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An Idaho dairy responded Wednesday to an animal rights group's latest video showing the abuse of cows, saying the renewed attention is likely to spur more threats to its staff. "We are the ones who will pay for what happens to our animals," family-owned Bettencourt Dairies said in a statement. "Yet the things in this world that take place every day, who will stop that, the bullying of our child when he steps foot in the public school, he had nothing to do with this. " Mercy for Animals on Tuesday released a clip from 2012 of a worker, who was eventually sentenced to jail, sexually abusing a cow. The video is being used to help fight legislation in Idaho that would punish people who go undercover to film at farms.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By David Pierson
Four dairy workers at a Wisconsin farm linked to Nestle were charged with animal cruelty after being caught on hidden camera beating, whipping and cutting animals. Abelardo Jaimes, Crescencio Pineda, Lucia Martinez and Misael Monge-Minero were charged with 11 counts of animal cruelty. The workers belonged to Wiese Brothers Farms in Greenleaf - a dairy that supplied a cooperative named Foremost Farms. Foremost Farms is a cheese supplier to Nestle's pizza division, which makes the DiGiorno brand.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Maybe cheap food is more expensive than we think. Capital Press, an agriculture publication that covers the Western United States, reports that the use of rBST, a synthetic hormone that boosts milk production, is plummeting among U.S. dairy operations. And the reason is surprising: It's all about economics. More than two-thirds of the American dairies that at some point used rBST have stopped, according to a study by a University of Alberta researcher. Among large dairies, use dropped from 44% in 2005 to 16% in 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Diana Marcum
STEVINSON, Calif. -  A leggy bridesmaid smoothed her Grecian-pleated dress and stuffed lipstick and two cigars into her cowboy boots.  Over by the horses, the best man slipped a flask out of his vest and offered a mare a sip. The preacher was late, but everything else was on schedule for the sunset wedding at the Double T. The cows had been herded from the pasture to make room for cars, and the barn was hung with white lights and Mason jars....
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
After a stretch of record-setting heat in late June and early July that blanketed much of the West, dairy prices could spike this summer.  Extreme heat causes cows to produce less milk, making farmers work harder to keep their Holsteins cool. The coming weeks are expected to bring prolonged heat to the Midwest, a top dairy producing region, according to meteorologists for Accuweather.com . California has also seen triple-digit temperatures recently, and this summer could bring other heat waves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State water officials are recommending more than $93,000 in fines for three dairies, two developers and an electronics company for U.S. Clean Water Act violations in the Santa Ana River basin. Standard Pacific Homes is accused of allowing 260,000 gallons of sediment-laden runoff to flow from a Tustin development site in February, according to Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board Executive Officer Gerard Thibeault. He recommended a $15,280 fine.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California consumers could soon feel another economic pinch from the ongoing energy crisis: higher milk prices. Dairy processors, some of the state's biggest natural gas users, have seen their bills increase up to tenfold recently, as surging demand and low inventories have forced them to pay the highest gas prices in the nation. Now they're set to pass on some of those costs to consumers.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
A fight over California's arcane milk-pricing system, which determines how much dairy farmers are paid for milk and other products, has spilled over into the federal farm bill and the state Legislature. On one side are farmers, who have been struggling in recent years with high feed and other costs. On the other are processors, who don't want to pay more for raw materials. The problem, farmers say, lies with the state's milk-pricing system, in place since the 1930s as a way to control market volatility.
NEWS
June 29, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
I embarked upon my month-long local diet with grand imaginings. I planned on learning more about my local foodshed, chatting with activist farmers about their crops and/or livestock, adopting healthier eating habits, and feeling more connected with my community, all while wearing peasant skirts and Heidi-esque braids. Most surprisingly, this all happened (albeit without the dramatic wardrobe change). In many places, being a locavore would result in an unbalanced diet, as a harsh climate can limit produce.
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