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Dairy Industry

NATIONAL
July 11, 2005 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
It all began with a lone farmer, Benjamin Smith, and a couple of Holsteins he milked by hand 85 years ago. Today, with Smith's granddaughter running the place, Smith Brothers Farm owns 3,000 cows and employs 171 people, including 61 deliverymen who drop milk on the doorsteps of 40,000 customers. The farm -- headquartered south of Seattle -- is one of a handful left in the Pacific Northwest that raises and milks the cows and processes and bottles the milk.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A dairyman who built his 9,100-cow facility in Tulare County without applying for an air permit is facing a federal lawsuit seeking a $15-million fine. Fred Schakel moved his Chino dairy to Tulare County last year. He started building the facility on Jan. 6, 2004 -- five days after a law took effect requiring large dairies to apply for air permits. A group of local activists sued last month, saying it is time that farmers did their part to help the Central Valley deal with air pollution.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2005 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
The 90-degree heat shimmers off the blacktop as Mark McLenithan dons a ski parka, gloves and goggles to go to work. McLenithan is plant manager for what today becomes the nation's largest ice cream factory, and he must be able to weather the minus-40 temperature of the "blast freezer" and the comparatively balmy minus-20 five-story warehouse. Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream Holdings Inc.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2005 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Southern California's dairy industry is stuck in the mud. Torrents of rain this month have soaked into piles of manure, leaving about 300,000 dairy cows, calves and other cattle in the Chino Valley mired in so much muck that exhausted and sick animals are dying at three times the normal rate, an industry trade group says. The waterlogged mess "acts like a giant sponge and expands," said Nathan de Boom, assistant manager of the Milk Producers Council in Chino.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2004 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
For decades, as his own industry struggled, seventh-generation dairy farmer Clark Hinsdale II watched visitors flock to the nearby Shelburne Museum to admire its vast American art collection. Hinsdale also was envious as travelers converged on the Vermont Teddy Bear Co. to create cuddly, customized stuffed animals, and crowded the Ben & Jerry's ice cream factory to taste the latest flavors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2004 | Mark Arax, Times Staff Writer
Citing harmful effects on air and water, a state agency voted Tuesday to impose a 90-day moratorium on awarding low-interest loans to California dairies. State Treasurer Phil Angelides, who heads the Pollution Control Financing Authority, said his agency erred in loaning nearly $66 million in anti-pollution bond money to a score of giant dairies that have helped turn the San Joaquin Valley into the nation's most polluted air basin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2004 | Mark Arax, Times Staff Writer
Over the last four years, nearly $70 million in state bond money designated for pollution control has financed a score of giant dairies that have helped turn the San Joaquin Valley into the nation's most polluted air basin.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2004 | Brian Melley, Associated Press
Alongside Interstate 80, a sign for the Milk Farm restaurant stands as a landmark for when this Sacramento Valley community was known as Dairy City and diners guzzled all-you-can-drink milk for a dime. But those days are long gone since the cafe closed, and some of the dairies that gave the city its distinction have dried up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Kern County officials are considering a freeze on new dairies after receiving proposals that would bring 20 dairies and a calf feedlot to the county -- a total of about 150,000 cows. County supervisors will meet Tuesday to discuss the ban on new projects. Even if no new dairies are allowed beyond those already proposed, the county's herd is expected to more than double, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2004 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge will begin fining five Chino dairies $500 a day if they don't implement a pilot project to reduce air and water pollution from foul-smelling open wastewater lagoons within two weeks. But a dairy representative said they are already at work designing a state-of-the-art wastewater lagoon, and accused environmental groups that sued the dairies of "just trying to make the headlines." U.S. District Court Judge Virginia A.
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