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Daisietta Kim

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005 | Donna Perlmutter, Special to The Times
She's more comfortable flying under the radar than in the bright light. And offstage, she can be self-effacing to a fault. But no matter how quietly she goes about her business, there's no discounting the formidable gifts of Los Angeles' own Daisietta Kim, a much-honored soprano, pianist, dancer and choreographer who also plays violin and organ.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005 | Donna Perlmutter, Special to The Times
She's more comfortable flying under the radar than in the bright light. And offstage, she can be self-effacing to a fault. But no matter how quietly she goes about her business, there's no discounting the formidable gifts of Los Angeles' own Daisietta Kim, a much-honored soprano, pianist, dancer and choreographer who also plays violin and organ.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA
In the course of a serious festival of new music, an entire program of miniatures might seem a painless diversion, as well as a respite from heaviness. And, indeed, the offering of 19 short pieces by 19 Southern California music-makers, presented Tuesday night in Japan America Theatre by the Independent Composers Assn. as part of the New Music L.A. 1987 Festival, turned out to be entertaining and breezy. But wasn't it also mostly pointless?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Only a week after a well-attended Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group performance of Schoenberg's "Pierrot Lunaire," Xtet put on another performance of the piece at LACMA's Bing Theatre on Monday, drawing a bigger-than-average Monday Evening Concerts turnout. Is this notoriously fearsome song cycle catching on? If so, it took only 89 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
No socks were knocked off, no bells rang and genuine thrills appeared seldom at the latest Monday Evening concert. Still, hope was not denied: Fascinating recent music, bracketed by 20th-Century standards, made up the program. The flexible-sized, contemporary-music specialist ensemble Xtet, one of the better local inventions of the 1980s, took over Bing Theater at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art for this event, presenting scores by David Ocker, Bright Sheng and Donald R.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1987 | GREGG WAGER
The delicate balance between how composers and performers perceive music can create a problem: The composer often listens for musical ideas and a sense of intellectual satisfaction, while the performer may like music that is technically challenging, and runs the gamut of what the instrument can do. Meanwhile, the listener is left to sort out these sensibilities and unfortunately is often caught with too much of one and not enough of the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1988 | GREGG WAGER
Friday night in the Campus Theatre at El Camino College, pianist Gloria Cheng and four other members of the chamber music ensemble XTET gave an intimate concert for a crowd consisting largely of students eager to receive credit for their attendance. Cheng's name received top billing but none of the works performed featured her as a soloist. Program notes given from the stage included cellist Roger Lebow's apt description of the program as "four works that used to be avant-garde."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1993 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
The Los Angeles-based chamber ensemble XTET--the "X" in this case being a variable number of players, between 2 and 12--presented a program of world premieres and other new works on the latest Monday Evening Concert, a noble, challenging and sometimes frustrating effort. The first performance of Arthur Jarvinen's "The Modulus of Elasticity" is a case in point.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2003 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
XTET's stated agenda has been to celebrate music of the last 100 or so years. As such, the skilled new-music ensemble, in concluding its 17th season Wednesday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, yielded a doubleheader with the programming of William Kraft's "Settings From Pierrot Lunaire," a late 20th century response to Arnold Schoenberg's early 20th century classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2003 | Donna Perlmutter, Special to The Times
To enact, or not to enact? That has been the question. Ever since the 1912 premiere of Arnold Schoenberg's landmark "Pierrot Lunaire," interpreters have taken steps either toward or away from the composer's edict not to theatricalize its performances. Yet the impulse to play the piece for all its inherent dramatic power, as Daisietta Kim and the ensemble Xtet did Friday at the Getty Center, is a winning one.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2002 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
Over its 17-year life, the fine and malleable new-music-minded ensemble Xtet has been more than a lurking presence on the performance scene but less than a steady one. The advent of its first residency at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, a three-concert series that began Wednesday, promises more continuity in public and a well-deserved opportunity to flex its agenda. That agenda involves the usual new-music business of giving premieres, but also tapping the annals of 20th century music.
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