Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDale Vigil
IN THE NEWS

Dale Vigil

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The principals who allowed three students to make up a failed class in less than a week so they could graduate with classmates in June have been transferred to other schools. Los Angeles schools Supt. John Deasy ordered the involuntary transfers in August after an investigation of complaints from one or more teachers at STEM Academy in Hollywood, where three seniors had failed a social studies class. The seniors withdrew from STEM and into Alonzo Community Day School, an adjacent alternative campus.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles school district officials announced Wednesday that Belmont High School will be restructured and most employees will have to reapply for their jobs and agree to a curriculum in which students will be taught in English, Spanish and Mandarin. The move marks the third time recently that officials have taken such measures using federal guidelines allowing districts to revamp struggling campuses. Belmont has improved almost 100 points on the Academic Performance Index over the last two years, which uses students' standardized test scores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2004 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Unified School District's game of musical chairs began Friday as Supt. Roy Romer announced which of the current 11 subdistrict chiefs would remain as their numbers shrink. Earlier in the week, the Los Angeles school board voted to reduce the number of administrative subdistricts from 11 to eight as a cost-saving measure. The new configuration was suggested by Romer as a compromise with the teachers union, which originally sought to abolish the subdistrict system altogether.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The rocky voyage of the city's flagship arts campus took a new turn Monday with the removal of the downtown high school's first and only principal. Suzanne Blake learned that she would be transferred from the still-unnamed Central Los Angeles High School #9 in a brief morning meeting with the new regional school-district administrator. The new leader of the year-old, $232-million school is Luis Lopez, a principal for the last five years at Franklin High in Highland Park. The decision to replace Blake, a former middle school principal, was made by Dale Vigil, the top administrator in that area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles school officials chose school district administrators to lead nine of the 11 subdistricts created by a sweeping reorganization. The other two appointees worked most recently in the Compton and Santa Rosa school districts. Under the reorganization plan developed by interim Supt. Ramon C. Cortines, which takes effect July 1, the leaders will have substantial control over resources in their districts and the autonomy to make most decisions about budgeting, procurement and personnel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Under intense pressure from various interest groups, the Los Angeles Board of Education on Tuesday is scheduled to decide who will run seven new high schools and six other campuses. It is the second major round of a singular, much-watched experiment to improve academic achievement by turning over schools to groups inside and outside the nation's second-largest school system. The scale of the project is staggering: The seven new high schools add up to more full-size, comprehensive high schools than in the cities of Glendale and Burbank combined.
OPINION
February 14, 2011
If this were a standardized test about standardized testing, it would follow a format like this: Standardized testing in California has: (a) Led to greater accountability. (b) Narrowed classroom instruction. (c) Prepared students for college. (d) Set teachers and administrators at each others' throats. (e) It's complicated. OK, so the testing gurus would never let us get away with (e), the real answer. But as important as it is to measure student progress, there's no getting around the effect that high-stakes annual testing has had on pedagogy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2001 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been 27 years since Tony Sandoval taught high school. Now the principal is trading his front office for a classroom. And he's getting a full-fledged education. On a recent day, Sandoval eagerly prepared a lesson about Karl Marx for his modern-world history class at South Gate High. Then he realized that several of his students hadn't done their reading. "You guys messed up. You didn't do your homework," he grumbled. "That hurts my feelings. You have an obligation to you and to me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000 | Profiles by Times staff writers Duke Helfand, Jill Leovy, Louis Sahagun and Kristina Sauerwein
DISTRICT A Schools: 68 Students: 68,266 % Credentialed teachers*: 68.5 % Free/reduced-price lunches**: 51.8 Deborah L. Leidner A Los Angeles Unified School District administrator for 20 years, Deborah L. Leidner has spent the last six years as head of the school cluster in Van Nuys and Reseda, which has experienced gains in standardized test scores and student attendance during her tenure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1991 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The list of winners and losers in the budget battles concluded by San Diego city schools trustees shows that those employees, parents and community activists who fought their cases publicly fared better than those who did not.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|