Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDam Removal
IN THE NEWS

Dam Removal

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1999
I support Rep. Elton Gallegly's proposal to investigate the possible removal Matilija Dam. Any time we have an opportunity to restore a natural river flow in California without loss of property or danger to our citizens, we should move toward that goal. It is apparent the removal of the dam will take place eventually, and we shouldn't wait until circumstances force the issue. LARRY ZINI, Camarillo
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County flood control officials presented several options for removing built-up debris and mud from a basin above Devil's Gate Dam in northern Pasadena in a draft environmental impact report released Thursday. The basin became choked by mud and debris after the 2009 Station fire and storms that followed. Flood control officials have warned for years that the buildup compromises the dam's ability to contain debris and floodwater in another major storm. Officials say locations downstream from the dam along the Arroyo Seco that could be in danger of flooding include the Rose Bowl, 110 Freeway, neighborhoods in Pasadena and South Pasadena, and the northeastern Los Angeles communities of Highland Park, Hermon, Montecito Heights, Mount Washington and Cypress Park.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2006 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
An ambitious plan to tear down the 198-foot-high Matilija Dam in Ventura County moved past the design phase Wednesday with the announcement of a $5-million state grant to prepare the site for the removal. The money will be used to tear out invasive weeds that are choking the Ventura River and to relocate two water wells, Ventura County Supervisor Steve Bennett said. The 58-year-old dam is northwest of Ojai.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
More than 90 years ago the San Clemente Dam rose on what John Steinbeck called in a novel "a lovely little river" that "has everything a river should have. " These days, that's not so true of the Carmel River, which empties into the Pacific Ocean just south of Carmel. The river is overpumped. Flood plain has been lost to development, and the silted-up San Clemente is vulnerable to collapse in an earthquake, threatening 1,500 downstream structures. But next month, in what officials say is the state's largest-ever dam removal, work will begin on a three-year project to dismantle the 106-foot-tall concrete dam and reroute half a mile of the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A $1.4-billion project to remove four hydroelectric dams and restore habitat to return Chinook salmon to the upper reaches of the Klamath River amounts to an experiment with no guarantee of success, an independent science review has concluded. A panel of experts evaluating the proposal expressed "strong reservations" that the effort could overcome the many environmental pressures that have driven the dramatic decline of what was one of the richest salmon rivers in the nation.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
In a deep turquoise pool in a gorge of steep granite and thick Douglas fir, dozens of salmon swam fitfully. Swirling and slow, they made their way up one side of the riverbed, only to run into the steep concrete face of Elwha Dam — the formidable barrier that for nearly 100 years has cut off most of the Elwha River from the salmon that traditionally populated it. Some primordial genetic imprint makes these fish keep trying. Nurtured in hatcheries for years, supplemented by the few wild fish that managed to spawn in the limited five-mile stretch of river left below the dam, these 20-pound chinook still fling themselves up the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1999 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying it would bring wide, sandy beaches to much of Ventura County and would protect threatened fish, dozens of environmentalists, scientists and officials from federal, state and local agencies met Monday to hash out a proposal to dismantle Matilija Dam. After hearing from a panel of experts, the 60 participants agreed to name a task force to answer several critical questions. Chief among them is: Who would pay for such a massive and costly project?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2004 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Ventura County supervisors signed off Tuesday on an environmental review of plans to tear down Matilija Dam near Ojai, setting the stage for a project designed to rescue an endangered migratory fish and restore sand flows to depleted beaches. Despite concerns about potential decreases in area water supplies, the Board of Supervisors unanimously endorsed a report outlining the environmental challenges and benefits posed by the $130-million project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County environmentalists are worried that budget cuts proposed by the Bush administration signal enthusiasm for the removal of Matilija Dam may be waning in Washington. "Things have been going downhill lately" on environmental issues, said Paul Jenkin, head of the Matilija Coalition. "I don't expect a lot of support from this administration."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
More than 90 years ago the San Clemente Dam rose on what John Steinbeck called in a novel "a lovely little river" that "has everything a river should have. " These days, that's not so true of the Carmel River, which empties into the Pacific Ocean just south of Carmel. The river is overpumped. Flood plain has been lost to development, and the silted-up San Clemente is vulnerable to collapse in an earthquake, threatening 1,500 downstream structures. But next month, in what officials say is the state's largest-ever dam removal, work will begin on a three-year project to dismantle the 106-foot-tall concrete dam and reroute half a mile of the river.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
In a deep turquoise pool in a gorge of steep granite and thick Douglas fir, dozens of salmon swam fitfully. Swirling and slow, they made their way up one side of the riverbed, only to run into the steep concrete face of Elwha Dam — the formidable barrier that for nearly 100 years has cut off most of the Elwha River from the salmon that traditionally populated it. Some primordial genetic imprint makes these fish keep trying. Nurtured in hatcheries for years, supplemented by the few wild fish that managed to spawn in the limited five-mile stretch of river left below the dam, these 20-pound chinook still fling themselves up the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2011 | By Joe Piasecki, Los Angeles Times
The removal of 25,000 cubic yards of sediment from the basin behind Devil's Gate Dam in Pasadena has been put on hold until August in order to prevent the destruction of a habitat for toads. Work was set to begin last week, but Pasadena officials decided to postpone the job pending further environmental review after Hahamongna Watershed Park users complained that Johnson Field, where the dirt was to be temporarily stored, was home to a large number of toads that would be smothered underneath the piles of dirt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A $1.4-billion project to remove four hydroelectric dams and restore habitat to return Chinook salmon to the upper reaches of the Klamath River amounts to an experiment with no guarantee of success, an independent science review has concluded. A panel of experts evaluating the proposal expressed "strong reservations" that the effort could overcome the many environmental pressures that have driven the dramatic decline of what was one of the richest salmon rivers in the nation.
OPINION
July 6, 2009 | Paul VanDevelder, Paul VanDevelder is the author of "Savages and Scoundrels: The Untold Story of America's Road to Empire Through Indian Territory."
If ever there were a story that foreshadowed the political and legal Waterloos that loom in seeking solutions to climate change, surely that cautionary tale is the one about the Columbia and Snake rivers' salmon and their imminent extinction. And like most stories about endangered species or environmental threats, this one is not only about fish and rivers -- it's about us.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2008 | Eric Bailey, Bailey is a Times staff writer.
The Bush administration announced a nonbinding agreement Thursday to uproot four hydropower dams that have blocked the migration of imperiled salmon up the troubled Klamath River, a project that could amount to the biggest dam removal in history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Firing the latest salvo in a battle over the future of the Klamath River, the California Energy Commission on Monday reaffirmed its stand that removing four hydroelectric dams that block salmon migration would cost less than trying to keep them. In December, the commission issued a report asserting that removing the dams and purchasing replacement power would cost roughly $100 million less than installing extensive new fish ladders for imperiled salmon and steelhead.
NEWS
July 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
A year after giant backhoes tore down a dam that had blocked the Kennebec River for 162 years, sea-run fish are swimming upstream in stunning numbers and the water is more full of life than it has been in generations. Conservationists say something else has been accomplished since the Edwards Dam became the first ordered removed by the federal government to protect the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2000 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the decaying, 53-year-old Matilija Dam as a backdrop, a coalition of conservation groups on Monday called on Gov. Gray Davis and President Clinton to "tear down this public nuisance." The dam has been blamed for everything from the decline of the endangered southern steelhead trout to the depletion of sand at Ventura County beaches. The damage caused by the dam is so great that the environmental group American Rivers listed the Ventura River as the third most endangered in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Federal officials called Tuesday for costly improvements to four Klamath River dams, a move that could hasten removal of a hydropower system that for generations has blocked imperiled salmon from their upriver spawning grounds. Interior and Commerce Department officials said that in order to get its license renewed, Portland-based PacifiCorp would be required to install fish ladders and screens to ease the salmon's annual migration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2006 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Setting the stage for a knockdown fight over the fate of four towering Klamath River dams accused of hammering salmon stocks and the West Coast fishing industry, a new government study released Friday has found that decommissioning the dams could cost $100 million less than operating them for another generation. The economic analysis, ordered by the California Energy Commission in cooperation with the U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|