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NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Hydroelectric dams may be known as a relatively clean and low-cost energy source, but a new study says that the sediment trapped behind them makes them hot spots for greenhouse gas emissions. A team of European scientists found that methane, which is produced by organic matter in the sediment that collects behind the impoundments, bubbles up through the water and contributes more of the greenhouse gases driving climate change than previously thought. The scientists studied six small dams on the River Saar in Germany and found “hot spot emission zones” of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that is many times more effective at trapping heat than carbon dioxide.
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NATIONAL
March 28, 2014 | By David Zucchino
MONCURE, N.C. -- Regulators in North Carolina cited Duke Energy on Friday for a crack in an earthen dam holding back coal ash slurry at a retired coal-burning plant, where the utility was cited March 20 for illegally dumping coal ash waste into the Cape Fear River. The "notice of deficiency" is the latest allegation against Duke Energy, which was responsible for a massive coal ash spill Feb. 2 that left 70 miles of the Dan River coated with coal ash sludge in North Carolina and Virginia -- the third-largest such spill in U.S. history.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1991
With respect to damming the Sespe, first--when one says, "No dams on the Sespe," that is quite literally what is meant--no dams, ever. The rivers and streams of the Earth are like the circulatory system in one's body--cut off the blood flow in an artery or vein and you'll damage your body. As soon as you countenance having even one dam on the Sespe, anywhere, even around Fillmore, it's like being a little bit pregnant--psychologically, politically, you've opened up the possibility for future dams.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
LOS ALGODONES, Mexico - Osvel Hinojosa knew that an infusion of water would bring the Colorado River delta back to life. But in just a few days, a U.S.-Mexican experiment to revive the delta environment has exceeded his expectations. The water is running deeper, faster and wider than anticipated in a channel that was once bone-dry. Hinojosa has spotted hawks, egrets and ospreys flying above the newly flowing water. He's even seen beavers. "It's just amazing to see that we can recover the river and see it alive again," said Hinojosa, water and wetlands program director at Pronatura Noroeste, a Mexican water conservation group.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | PETER H. KING
It's a memory from his early boyhood, and much has faded away. Charlie Casey remembers going with his grandfather to cut a ribbon at one of California's great new dams. He can't recall where, or exactly when. He does remember a VIP tour of the structure's innards. He remembers skimming across the reservoir in an amphibious car, and thinking: "Pretty cool." And why not? Dams meant growth and growth was good.
WORLD
May 21, 2011 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of people marched Friday in Santiago to protest a proposed hydroelectric project in southern Chile that critics say will spoil much of the pristine and biodiverse Patagonia region that is an increasingly popular eco-tourism destination. The $3.2-billion HidroAysen project calls for construction of five dams on the Baker and Pascua rivers in the country's Aysen region. It is expected to increase the electrical power supply by 15% when construction is completed in 2020. The project has received less international publicity than the proposed Belo Monte power project on the Xingu River in Brazil's Amazon, which would produce four times the energy.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | Reuters
Portugal's new Socialist Party government stopped work Tuesday on a controversial dam whose waters threatened rock carvings that archeologists say are among Europe's oldest. Prime Minister Antonio Guterres told the Assembly of the Republic that work on the Coa River dam project would be halted while experts are given time to confirm the date of the artwork.
NEWS
March 24, 1988
Land owners at Big Bear Lake voted overwhelmingly in favor of a tax to help raise $10.8 million needed to rebuild the cracked and leaking 76-year-old Bear Valley Dam in the San Bernardino Mountains. The state, fearing that an earthquake could destroy the dam and flood residents below, mandated that the 82-foot tall structure be rebuilt by October or that the recreational lake behind it be drained.
WORLD
January 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
India completed construction of a $7.7-billion dam that environmental groups say will uproot the lives of hundreds of thousands of people. Authorities hailed the completion of the Sardar Sarovar Project in the Narmada Valley of Gujarat state nearly two decades after the dam was begun. They called it an answer to thirst and irrigation and power needs of millions in the nation's vast, parched west.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | Reuters
The U.N. cultural body UNESCO is asking Portugal to suspend the building of a dam that would submerge a remote valley containing hundreds, perhaps thousands, of prehistoric rock carvings. The engravings came to the attention of scientists when the state utility company asked an archeologist to research the valley. Secretary of State for Culture Manuel Frexes said the government will make a decision on the matter within three months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The storms that doused Los Angeles County over the weekend filled reservoirs in the San Gabriel Mountains with some 6 billion gallons of water, enough to supply more than 150,000 people for a year. The twin storms left more than 11 inches of rain in some higher elevations. The rainfall from the storms was enough to substantially fill some dams that were at minimum levels, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works, which operates 14 dams and debris basins in local ranges.
OPINION
January 17, 2014 | By Christle Balvin
California's coastal mountains have a compulsion to get to the sea. They are constantly sending sand and sediment downstream to the beaches. Or at least they're trying to. But today, a system of 14 dams along the foothills of the San Gabriels prevents much of the sand from reaching the shore. The result is a slowly eroding coastline, a network of ugly concrete storm channels where streams once flowed, and an ever-increasing accumulation of earth behind the dams. Southern California rivers are notoriously unpredictable.
OPINION
January 10, 2014 | By Paul VanDevelder
As all eyes in the West look to the courts, the skies and the Colorado River for relief from 14 years of drought, it might be useful to remember the battles waged by two titans of the 20th century who played leading roles in the drama that led to the current mess. The first protagonist was Arizona's favorite son, Sen. Barry Goldwater. His nemesis was the fearless environmental crusader, David Brower, a founder of the Sierra Club known to those who loved him as The Archdruid. Early in their parallel careers, these two men were fierce adversaries over water projects across the Southwest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2013
Fifty years ago, the Baldwin Hills Reservoir dam ruptured, sending 150 million gallons of Los Angeles drinking water roaring into homes and cars along nearby Cloverdale Avenue. Five people were killed, 65 hillside homes were torn apart and 210 other homes and apartments were damaged in an area between Jefferson and La Cienega boulevards and La Brea Avenue. On Saturday, the anniversary of the disaster, survivors gathered where the dam burst , in what is now the Upper Kenneth Hahn State Recreation Area.
SPORTS
November 1, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
  CORVALLIS, Ore. - They threw it deep again, Marqise Lee sprinting, Nelson Agholor shedding, Cody Kessler winging, their expressions stuck on wow. They ran it hard again, eight times on one touchdown drive, half the field on one touchdown run, and all at once now, everyone say hello to Javorius Allen. They played swaggering defense again, blocking a field goal, picking off a pass in the end zone, enraging nearly 50,000 hostile witnesses with gestures and joy. On the day after Halloween, against an opponent dressed like pumpkins, the USC football team shed its disguise of the last two seasons and became Trojans again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County flood control officials presented several options for removing built-up debris and mud from a basin above Devil's Gate Dam in northern Pasadena in a draft environmental impact report released Thursday. The basin became choked by mud and debris after the 2009 Station fire and storms that followed. Flood control officials have warned for years that the buildup compromises the dam's ability to contain debris and floodwater in another major storm. Officials say locations downstream from the dam along the Arroyo Seco that could be in danger of flooding include the Rose Bowl, 110 Freeway, neighborhoods in Pasadena and South Pasadena, and the northeastern Los Angeles communities of Highland Park, Hermon, Montecito Heights, Mount Washington and Cypress Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1999
Plans to build a diversion dam on Conejo Creek near Camarillo have raised the ire of conservationists, who contend the small stream is crucial to the survival of Southern steelhead trout. Proponents of the project say there is no evidence that Conejo Creek, which flows into Calleguas Creek, is a key spawning habitat for the oceangoing fish. They say the $9-million dam is needed to meet the area's water demands and relieve pressure on overused aquifers.
NEWS
October 2, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
The 85-year-old federal Bureau of Reclamation, facing the end of the era in which big dams are being built in the West, announced Thursday that it will focus on water cleanup and conservation in a reorganization that could cut its 8,000-member staff in half by 1998. "The bureau largely has accomplished the job for which Congress created it in 1902--namely, to reclaim the arid West," said James W. Ziglar, assistant secretary of the Interior for water and science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
L.A. County flood-control officials presented several options for removing built-up debris and mud from a basin above Devil's Gate Dam in northern Pasadena in a draft environmental impact report released Thursday. The basin became choked by mud and debris after the 2009 Station fire and storms that followed. Flood-control officials have warned for years that the build-up compromises the dam's ability to contain another major storm. They say areas downstream from the dam along the Arroyo Seco -- including the Rose Bowl, 110 Freeway and neighborhoods in Pasadena, South Pasadena and the northeastern Los Angeles communities of Highland Park, Hermon, Montecito Heights, Mount Washington and Cypress Park -- could be in danger of flooding.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
BONNEVILLE DAM, Wash. - The tiny fish-counting station, with its window onto the Columbia River, was darkened so the migrating salmon would not be spooked. And it was silent - until the shimmering bodies began to flicker by. Then the room erupted with loud clicks, as Janet Dalen's fingers flew across her stumpy keyboard. Tallying the darting specimens, she chanted and chortled, her voice a cross between fish whisperer and aquatic auctioneer. Her body swayed from left to right. Her tightly curled bangs never moved.
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