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Dan Lungren

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2002 | George Skelton
SACRAMENTO It was a simple question I lobbed Bill Simon last May. A softball. Easy to hit. "Are you for the death penalty?" I asked him at a Republican fund-raising event. "I'd rather keep that off the record," the political novice replied. "I am, but I want to come up to speed first before answering on the record." Whoaaa! Here's a conservative who wants to be the Republican nominee for governor, but can't say publicly whether he's for the death penalty? Being pro-execution is a must for any gubernatorial candidate in California, regardless of party.
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NEWS
March 1, 2000
Dr. John C. Lungren, 83, friend and personal physician of Richard M. Nixon's who diagnosed the former president's life-threatening blood clot. Lungren, also the father of former congressman and California Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren, was on the staff of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center for four decades and was its chief of staff from 1968 to 1971. The doctor also taught at UCLA and served on the California Medical Board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE
Dan Lungren, former state attorney general and U.S. congressman, will join the faculty of Chapman University in Orange next spring. According to university President James Doti, Lungren--who spent two terms as attorney general and is lecturing at Harvard--will teach one course at Chapman's School of Law and another in its political science department.
NEWS
January 7, 1999 | Associated Press
An opinion on abortion and birth control counseling issued by Dan Lungren on his final workday as attorney general was withdrawn Wednesday by new Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer. Lungren's opinion, issued last Thursday, said that a public school district may operate a health clinic that does not allow pregnancy and abortion counseling or referrals to minors.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
After 20 years in politics--experiencing the highs, the lows, the in-betweens--there is still something monumentally awful about falling on your face in front of 33 million people. Ask Dan Lungren. "In other lines of work, you lose or something doesn't work out . . . obviously you're very disappointed. But it's not like it's public"--and here he laughs ruefully--"it's not like everywhere you walk people come up to you."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1998
Prior to last November's elections, political pundits confidently predicted significant Republican gains in Congress. They were wrong. After the election, the same pundits were certain that the House would never impeach President Clinton. Wrong again. Also, since the election, pundits like Tony Quinn ("The Eyes of California Republicans Should Be on Texas," Opinion, Dec. 20) have vehemently asserted that the California Republican Party was routed in November because of its position on immigration.
NEWS
November 9, 1998 | GEORGE SKELTON
Add Gov. Pete Wilson to the long list of Republicans who think that Dan Lungren ran an inexcusably inept race for governor. The party's nominee exhibited a weird mix of naivete and arrogance, Wilson and other GOP pols are complaining privately. The attorney general was naive about how to run a big-time race, they assert, and too arrogant to accept advice. In fact, Wilson firmly believes he could have whipped Democrat Gray Davis, were he not barred by term limits from running.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1998 | KENNETH L. KHACHIGIAN, Kenneth L. Khachigian is a former White House speech writer who practices law in Orange County. He is a veteran political strategist who ran Bruce Herschensohn's 1992 campaign. His column appears here every other week
President John Adams once said facts are stubborn things. The same is true of vote margins. That's why Republicans and conservatives spent a week watching election returns last Tuesday night. The view from this corner: The governor's race: Dan Lungren lost the general election last June. Gray Davis capitalized on California's new open primary, seeking votes across party lines (from male as well as female Republicans), appealed to independents and nailed down his base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1998 | ARNOLD STEINBERG, Arnold Steinberg is a political strategist whose clients have included Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan and former Carmel Mayor Clint Eastwood
In a debate during the open primary, Dan Lungren was asked to pledge, if he became governor, not to run for higher office in two years. Lungren refused to commit to serve four full years. Why? Hubris. This same arrogance would shape how he approached his campaign. It became his public personality, often making it difficult for him to communicate with the electorate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1998 | ROBERT A. JONES
Last spring, a few of us sat watching the gubernatorial debate on the telly. There stood Jane Harman, Gray Davis and Al Checchi--remember Al Checchi?--along one side of the stage. At the other side stood Dan Lungren. Checchi seemed to be practicing his confused look. Harman whined about macho politics. Davis told stories about his soldier days in Vietnam. Meanwhile, Lungren smiled benignly on the scene. He talked about his love of California and his devotion to the ethos of Ronald Reagan.
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