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Dana Point Ca Development And Redevelopment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1991 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tucked along a narrow, 1.6-mile strip here is a California paradox--a picturesque beach, reachable by a residential road that is kept off limits to the public by a public agency. "I can't think of another situation like that," said Linda Locklin, manager of the California Coastal Commission's coastal access program.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County supervisors on Tuesday cleared the way for an $82-million revitalization of Dana Point Harbor, the first true make-over of the marina since its birth. Among the changes ahead are a renovation of the 132-room Marina Inn, a harbor parking structure and larger boat slips. The project has evolved during a two-year stretch as the county renegotiated new contracts to replace 30-year leases that were signed in 1971 when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed the harbor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1993 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventy years ago it made sense, at least on paper. Build a thriving resort community along the pristine coastal bluffs halfway between San Diego and Los Angeles and they will come. Today in Dana Point, however, only part of the promise has come true. This coastal community named for 19th-Century explorer and author Richard Henry Dana has nationally known hotels and a bustling harbor that attracts thousands of tourists every week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Coastal Commission on Thursday approved a cell phone tower in Seal Beach, voted to scrutinize a spa in Dana Point and delayed ruling on a contentious plan to build a gated community and outlet center in San Clemente. The commission, meeting in Los Angeles, unanimously approved a Verizon Wireless cell phone tower on the northern corner of Zoeter Field, a baseball field at 11th Street and Landing Avenue in Seal Beach.
NEWS
February 2, 1994 | DAVID HALDANE and LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Tuesday that it has placed a small mouse on the emergency endangered species list, a move that could delay a proposed $500-million resort on one of the few undeveloped coastal properties left in Orange County. The Pacific pocket mouse, rediscovered last year after not having been observed since 1971, "is part of California's natural heritage. They are an important part of the ecology," said Fred Roberts, a botanist with the service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1991 | LEN HALL
An appellate court has ruled in favor of 11 Dana Point property owners who claim that a developer deceived them by promising that 71 new homes would not block their valley and ocean views. The ruling, handed down Dec. 31 by the state's 4th District Court of Appeal with a 2-1 vote, says the landowners have the right to sue Southwest Diversified Co. of San Francisco, builder of the Village at Dana Point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1991 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to its outraged and divided constituents, the City Council voted Tuesday to kill a controversial redevelopment plan. The council, acting as the Community Redevelopment Agency, voted 3 to 2 to scrap the preliminary redevelopment plan and disband the citizens advisory committee that was to have guided the redevelopment. However, the council did not rule out reopening the redevelopment issue at a later date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1990 | LEN HALL
At one time, all three buildings in the 24500 block of Del Prado Avenue housed thriving businesses. But Dana Point Glass moved several blocks away, Windsurfer magazine drifted to the Los Angeles area and the Captain's Anchorage restaurant shut down. The 73,000-square-foot site is the future home of the Dana Point Post Office. But in the meantime, the buildings sit unattended, attracting vagrants and prompting complaints from area residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The developer of the 122-acre Headlands property in Dana Point wants to build more homes on the environmentally sensitive area and bring a new attraction to Orange County--a lighthouse on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Developer Sanford Edward, who recently won a court case forcing the city to drop its own Headlands' plan and process Edward's, added the lighthouse to the project after holding meetings with local residents who suggested it, he said.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE and ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major Japanese financial concern said Friday that it has agreed to acquire a 231-acre swath of seaside land known as Monarch Beach for more than $100 million from Qintex, the troubled Australian entertainment and resort company. Tokyo-based Nippon Shinpan Co. Ltd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000 | Sharon Nagy, (714) 966-5832
The Planning Commission has approved a request to build 43 single-family homes on a 24.7-acre site known as Capistrano by the Sea. The permit was approved 4 to 0 at the commission's Wednesday meeting, with Commissioner Norm Denton dissenting because he lives near the site, which could have been a conflict of interest. The site is east of Big Sur and west of Del Obispo Street. Information: (949) 248-9890.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1990 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since moving from Costa Mesa last year, attorney Paul Konapelsky has enjoyed a bird's-eye view of Monarch Bay from his hilltop home in the exclusive Bear Brand neighborhood. But to Konapelsky's chagrin, his panoramic vista may soon be obscured by a maze of commercial buildings. If a developer has his way, Konapelsky could be staring out his window at the tarred rooftop of a strip mall and a multiscreen theater, a two-level parking lot, a gas station and a 60-foot tower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1994 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $500-million resort plan for the Headlands in Dana Point was placed in jeopardy Monday when the county registrar of voters approved a petition calling for a citywide referendum on the development. City Atty. Jerry Patterson said the action forces the City Council to either rescind last month's approval of the project or put it up for a vote. "I suppose the council could refuse to act, but I think that is very unlikely," Patterson said.
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