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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
A conference to help dancers tackle the Sisyphean task of surviving and succeeding in Los Angeles will feature an unprecedented array of city, county, nonprofit and artistic leaders. The inaugural L.A. Dance Summit, scheduled for June 8 at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center in Little Tokyo, is a “big tent opportunity,” said co-organizer Bonnie Oda Homsey, a professional dancer, administrator and educator.  Because of the city's sprawl, “it's easy get in a silo mode and miss opportunities to communicate,” said Homsey, who performed with the Martha Graham Dance Company in New York City and co-founded the American Repertory Dance Company here in 1994.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Cat Deeley is superstitious. If she was going to be nominated for serving as host on Fox's popular reality TV competition, "So You Think You Can Dance," she wanted to hear the news from her husband, not a publicist or a manager. "So my husband rang me this morning and said, 'I'm very proud of you, and don't I have a clever wife,'" said Deeley, who is flying to New York City on Friday morning for a friend's wedding. "There will be big celebrations there and when we get back to L.A.," said Deeley, her English accent touched with enthusiasm.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1987 | ZAN DUBIN
Members of the local dance community, left adrift without a unifying service organization since last summer, began collecting funds Monday night to launch a new support structure. They've named it the Dance Resource Center of Greater Los Angeles. After a two-hour meeting of dancers, choreographers and other dance enthusiasts at the Japanese American Community and Cultural Center, volunteer organizers of the developing nonprofit dance organization took in at least $1,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
It's the end of an artistic era: After more than a century, the Metropolitan Opera has disbanded its ballet with a modern-day buyout. The eight remaining members of the Metropolitan Opera Ballet, down from 16 in 2011, agreed Monday to leave the company, the New York Times reports. The dancers accepted a package that includes $75,000 in severance and two additional years of health care coverage under the opera's plan. There's disagreement on whether the ballet, which has been associated with the Met since its inception in 1883, will be forever defunct.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Darlene Neel, former manager of the Bella Lewitzky Dance Company and an important figure in the Southern California dance community, has died of cancer at the age of 58. Neel died Dec. 3 in Los Angeles, according to her friend and colleague, Serena Tripi. A native of Los Angeles who held bachelor's degrees in both business and theater, Neel helped create and guide several local arts organizations, including the Dance Resource Center of Greater Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2012 | By Laura Bleiberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Just past the front desk at the Equinox fitness club in Westwood, a sign encourages members to sign up for their free 15-minute Pilates session. Next to the sign is Pilates instructor Ashley Hoffman, a 26-year-old with a porcelain complexion and full, reddish-brown hair. She and another trainer chat while waiting for spontaneous customers, but the fit-looking men and women checking in zoom by to the cardio and weight machines upstairs. There are no takers on this mid-December morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2004
What purpose does a bitterly sarcastic critique of a local professional dance company serve? ["Choreography Steps Over Its Own Feelings" by Lewis Segal, Aug. 9.] Just the day before, Segal wrote of the [dwindling] funding of arts in Los Angeles and its effect on the dance community. In his very next article, he personally attacked the artistic sensibilities of choreographer-dancer Regina Klenjoski, a longtime contributor to the L.A. dance community. Not only has Klenjoski sustained a company since 1999 (now regularly employing six dancers)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1986 | ZAN DUBIN
Los Angeles Area Dance Alliance, formed to serve and support a struggling local dance community, has dissolved after 10 troubled years. "For all practical purposes, we're out of business," alliance board of directors chairman Cheryl Cromwell said Friday. "We intend to formally file for dissolution (with the state attorney general's office) as soon as we get the paper work together." An irreversible mix of financial and administrative problems led to the alliance's demise, Cromwell said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1986 | ZAN DUBIN
Members of the local dance community are taking preliminary steps toward forming a service group to at least partially fill the gap left by the recent dissolution of the Los Angeles Area Dance Alliance. An ad hoc committee of arts administrators has been developing recommendations to present to the dance community for a new dance service organization, said committee organizer Brian Gormley, a marketing consultant and past member of the dance alliance's artistic advisory board.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1990
To paraphrase Lewis Segal's June 18 review of Pacific Dance Ensemble, it seems to me he has a lot to answer for. The tenor of all of Segal's coverage of Generator Eight has indicated a serious misunderstanding of the economics of producing dance in Los Angeles. If dance companies didn't self-produce or create cooperative ventures like Generator Eight, there would be very little new and risky dance in Los Angeles for him to criticize. Moreover, his continual focus on the "controversy" around Generator Eight implies that he would rather people such as Danielle Shapiro didn't try to produce dance if their efforts generate anything less than a supportive reaction within the dance community.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
A conference to help dancers tackle the Sisyphean task of surviving and succeeding in Los Angeles will feature an unprecedented array of city, county, nonprofit and artistic leaders. The inaugural L.A. Dance Summit, scheduled for June 8 at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center in Little Tokyo, is a “big tent opportunity,” said co-organizer Bonnie Oda Homsey, a professional dancer, administrator and educator.  Because of the city's sprawl, “it's easy get in a silo mode and miss opportunities to communicate,” said Homsey, who performed with the Martha Graham Dance Company in New York City and co-founded the American Repertory Dance Company here in 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2012 | By Laura Bleiberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A bit of déjà vu in Los Angeles during 2012. Like 2011 - which ended with the announcement that Benjamin Millepied was moving here to start his own arts collective, L.A. Dance Project - this year has drawn to a close with a big announcement that is touted as a major step forward for dance in Los Angeles. Philanthropist Glorya Kaufman has made an undisclosed, but apparently multi-million dollar donation to USC, to help build and endow a top-tier school of dance for the Trojans. It's a boon for USC, but let's call this what it really is: a great lost opportunity for the city's dance community and a sorry misdirection of enormous and valuable resources.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2012 | By Rachel B. Levin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When a circle forms in the middle of a nightclub dance floor, it's often one of two things: Either someone in a drunken party has decided to bust out "the sprinkler" or a posse of breakdancers takes over to showcase its acrobatic power moves. But at the Floor, a unique multi-genre dance night held every third Monday at Hollywood's King King, anything's possible (except, perhaps, the sprinkler). Because it attracts professional dancers and dance enthusiasts from all over the stylistic map, you're just as likely to glimpse a swing dance couple sweeping through the circle with flips and aerials as a pair of tango dancers gliding across in a sultry embrace, or a tap dancer banging out a jazzy freestyle duet with the band's saxophonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Lewis Segal, Special to the Los Angeles Times
3-D or not 3-D: That is the question. Or at least it's one question ricocheting through the dance community in the aftermath of "Pina," Wim Wenders' recent 3-D film tribute to the late innovative German choreographer and Tanztheater Wuppertal company leader Pina Bausch. In one sense, it's a nonissue: Every classic dance film ever made would have infinitely more power with real dimensional space around, behind, above and in front of the dancers. Think about Fred Astaire gunning down the corps in "Top Hat" or the fantastic colors and shapes in "The Red Shoes" ballet or Baryshnikov defining male classicism for the whole century in "The Turning Point" or Patrick Swayze having the time of his life in "Dirty Dancing" or the Merce Cunningham company making modernism irresistibly seductive in "Points in Space.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2012 | By Laura Bleiberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Just past the front desk at the Equinox fitness club in Westwood, a sign encourages members to sign up for their free 15-minute Pilates session. Next to the sign is Pilates instructor Ashley Hoffman, a 26-year-old with a porcelain complexion and full, reddish-brown hair. She and another trainer chat while waiting for spontaneous customers, but the fit-looking men and women checking in zoom by to the cardio and weight machines upstairs. There are no takers on this mid-December morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2010 | By Susan Josephs, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Maria Gillespie clearly remembers her excitement upon learning of her acceptance into REDCAT's first New Original Works Festival. "It was the first thing I got into where I wasn't self-producing, and it had a reputation that could help propel me forward," says the Los Angeles-based choreographer, who founded the company Oni Dance the following year. Since 2004, Gillespie and some 25 other choreographers and dance-based artists have presented their work in the annual REDCAT festival, now in its seventh year and unwavering in its mission to support experimental dance, theater, music and interdisciplinary works by Los Angeles-based artists both emerging and established.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2004
As someone who lived in Los Angeles and worked in the dance community for a number of years, I find the situation that dance companies face extremely appalling. When I read in Lewis Segal's very thorough article "Late for the Dance" (Aug. 8) that BalletFest, New World Flamenco Festival and more are being "hit" for extinction then I have to wonder -- are there any real champions of dance in Southern California? Everyone seems to care about the Bolshoi or American Ballet Theater, and there are always millions upon millions of dollars for big, opulent buildings, but now the bare pittance for dance companies is dwindling even more.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1988 | EILEEN SONDAK
Three's Company has kept a low profile lately, but its co-artistic director Jean Isaacs has not. Isaacs has been busy playing choreographic consultant to the Las Vegas Allied Arts Council. "I just came back from Vegas," Isaacs said, "and I've seen a lot of dance--and a lot of good dancers. Vegas is tired of being criticized for its commercialism, so the dance community made an effort to produce a cultural program, something like our alliance concerts. They invited me to give them feedback."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009 | Victoria Looseleaf
Seven dancers move in unison to the throbbing of minimalist music. Twitching spasmodically, the performers then indulge in a series of backward bends and sideways swooping. As the sun streams into the studio at Westside School of Ballet, it illuminates the dancers' dispassionate faces, their movement free from any lyrical or psychological elements. Indeed, this is the signature style of postmodern guru Rudy Perez, who turns 80 next month. Perez, having decamped from his native New York to Los Angeles more than three decades ago, is celebrating the milestone by -- what else?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2008 | Jevon Phillips, Times Staff Writer
When the explosion of dance crews and "battling" happened in the late '70s and early '80s as hip-hop grew, competitive reality television was years away. But with the popularity of "American Idol," "Dancing With the Stars" and "So You Think You Can Dance," a group dance competition such as "Randy Jackson Presents America's Best Dance Crew" on MTV was probably inevitable. Now, as its second season draws to a close, the show can lay claim to being one of the most popular on MTV -- it draws celebrity fans (Miley Cyrus)
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