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Dance Music

ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
The last time local government took a close interest in electronic dance music around downtown L.A., the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission banned raves at the facility after a teenage girl's drug death at Electric Daisy Carnival in 2010. The ban was eventually lifted, yet the incident was a dark cloud over dance music's future on public property in the heart of L.A. But that tune will soon change. Starting Sunday, a new monthly series produced by the owners of the Fashion District's Pattern Bar will bring sophisticated underground dance artists to Grand Park, one of the city's most significant and idyllic new public spaces.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Insomniac Events, the producer of the Electric Daisy Carnival dance music events, confirmed in a statement to the Los Angeles Times that it has had talks with Live Nation Entertainment Inc. regarding a sale to that company, but no deal is complete. The Los Angeles Times reported on Thursday that Beverly Hills-based Live Nation would purchase a roughly 50% interest in Insomniac. The company produces electronic dance music concerts at venues across Southern California and elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Concert and ticketing giant Live Nation Entertainment Inc. is nearing a deal to acquire a stake in the events company that puts on the Electric Daisy Carnival dance music festival, a person with knowledge of the matter confirmed. Beverly Hills-based Live Nation would purchase a roughly 50% interest in Insomniac Events. The Los Angeles company produces electronic dance music concerts at venues across Southern California and elsewhere. The Wall Street Journal, which first reported news of the pending sale, said Live Nation is paying $50 million for the stake in Insomniac.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Sparks, the long-running L.A. pop-dance-rock band consisting of brothers Ron and Russell Mael, has long pushed at the boundaries of pop music. The quirky outfit created humor-laced operatic rock in the early 1970s that influenced Freddie Mercury and Queen, cooked up influential electronic dance music in the late '70s and flirted with pop stardom in the snappy techno-rock of its 1983 hit single "Cool Places. " The Mael brothers have since explored other quirky niches of the pop music world, abandoning the rock band format entirely for a trio of albums built on electronic and orchestral sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By August Brown
This post has been updated. See below for details. INDIO -- Anyone wondering if the lack of dance megastars at this year's Coachella means that they've de-emphasized big dance music, don't worry. This year's Sahara tent somehow managed to be even bigger than in years prior, by an obvious margin. Gone is the typical A-frame enclosure -- instead there's a positively titanic, rounded arena for rave gladiators. The digital wall of visuals expanded to the upper nooks of the roof to make an aquarium of sub-bass topped with throbbing LEDs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
Sometimes even the most devoted ravers outgrow their fairy wings and neon bikinis. The 160,000 people expected to attend Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival over the next two weekends will find a new electronic music tent with the kind of accouterments rarely seen at these venues - including air conditioning, a hardwood floor and comfy chairs. The new Yuma tent is a world apart from the bare grass floors and body heat of other tents, reflecting maturing tastes and older fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By August Brown
With hangovers from the Ultra Music Fest still fresh in their throbbing heads, some of the most important names in dance music will make another run of it in Hollywood on April 17 at a new edition of the International Music Summit. The recurring Ibiza-based conversation series -- a more sober and dance-business-focused gathering -- makes its inaugural L.A. turn at the W Hotel after a satellite event at last year's Coachella festival. The conference will host a full day of interviews between titans of electronic dance music, tech and the music-biz infrastructure.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By August Brown
The snow machines were a welcome touch at Swedish House Mafia's Friday farewell set in Chinatown. On a night with miserable outdoor concert weather -- chilly temperatures, with just enough rain to turn the L.A. State Historic Park into a frigid mud slurry -- when the trio of DJs kicked on the midfield snowblowers, you could almost pretend that you were actually raving astride a Swedish fjord. Almost. “Serious respect to the girls who came out dressed in bikinis on this … warm spring night,” joked one of the Mafia members from atop a monolithic tiered stage at the park's north end. “That's the kind of friends we have.” If EDM artists and festivals have enjoyed a perpetual spring and summer in America over the last few years, the retirement of Swedish House Mafia might herald a changing season.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Detroit, Chicago and Manchester all had their moment as mad laboratories of electronic dance music. Now it's Monterrey's turn. Mexico's second-largest metropolis, a manufacturing hub, now specializes in the art of industrial noise. Texturally speaking, Monterrey's prime contribution to EDM's thumping ambience has been introducing the exuberant rhythms of northern Mexico and the Caribbean - specifically cumbia, vallenato and norteño, and accordion tracks - to the four-on-the-floor status quo. No band currently is more emblematic of that renegade sound than 3BALLMTY (pronounced tribal or tree-ball Monterrey)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
If your dad advises you not to go into the family business, it's perhaps understandable when the family business happens to be fighting fires or window-washing skyscrapers. But it might seem odd that Raul and Mexia Hernández's dad urged his sons not to become musicians. Music, after all, has been very good not only to their father, Hernán Hernández, but also to his brothers and cousins who make up the superstar Mexican norteño band Los Tigres del Norte. "One thing my dad always mentioned to us was the sacrifices you have to make, being away from your family, and kind of missing those things, the graduations, the soccer games," Mexia recalled recently.
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