Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDance Review
IN THE NEWS

Dance Review

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Victoria Looseleaf
The most startling - and stunning - moment in David Roussève's latest dance-theater hybrid, "Stardust," came an hour into the 80-minute intermissionless piece, which premiered Tuesday at REDCAT. The 53-year-old choreographer appeared, seemingly out of nowhere, to perform a heartwrenching solo set to Johnny Mathis crooning the Bach/Gounod “Ave Maria.” With his jerking, swooping arms and quasi-angelic face, Roussève, bathed in Christopher Kuhl's amber light, and bending and dipping as if the world's weight were on his shoulders, was spellbinding.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Laura Bleiberg
In the contemporary ballet “Liliom” -- based on a 1909 play of the same name, which Rodgers & Hammerstein turned into the musical “Carousel” -- Hamburg Ballett choreographer-director John Neumeier sends the audience home with a surprising hopefulness surrounding the iconic, central couple. The German company gave “Liliom” its American debut this weekend at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts. The carnival barker Liliom bestows his final kiss on the innocent Julie, and this confirmation of shared love had particular power and promise Friday night.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Laura Bleiberg
In the contemporary ballet “Liliom” -- based on a 1909 play of the same name, which Rodgers & Hammerstein turned into the musical “Carousel” -- Hamburg Ballett choreographer-director John Neumeier sends the audience home with a surprising hopefulness surrounding the iconic, central couple. The German company gave “Liliom” its American debut this weekend at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts. The carnival barker Liliom bestows his final kiss on the innocent Julie, and this confirmation of shared love had particular power and promise Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Victoria Looseleaf
The most startling - and stunning - moment in David Roussève's latest dance-theater hybrid, "Stardust," came an hour into the 80-minute intermissionless piece, which premiered Tuesday at REDCAT. The 53-year-old choreographer appeared, seemingly out of nowhere, to perform a heartwrenching solo set to Johnny Mathis crooning the Bach/Gounod “Ave Maria.” With his jerking, swooping arms and quasi-angelic face, Roussève, bathed in Christopher Kuhl's amber light, and bending and dipping as if the world's weight were on his shoulders, was spellbinding.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Laura Bleiberg
Journeying through life is a messy business.  Finding one's authentic place is even messier, if not downright impossible. Life's disorderliness was both a theatrical device and a philosophical theme for New York-based choreographer Faye Driscoll in her latest dance-theater piece, “You're Me.” Driscoll, who grew up in Venice, and Jesse Zaritt, her collaborator and fellow performer, were presented Thursday and Friday by UCLA's Department of...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1991 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
David Wilcox recently changed the name of his company to Los Angeles Classical Ballet but it might be more accurately called Les Ballets Russes de Long Beach. Not since Mikhail Baryshnikov attempted to turn American Ballet Theatre into Little Leningrad have so many Soviet ballet artists dominated a U.S. company.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2013 | By Victoria Looseleaf
Melissa McCarthy and Sandra Bullock aren't the only ones packing heat.  L.A.-based Viver Brasil scorched the Ford Amphitheatre on Saturday with its hybrid moves that mix Bahian Candomblé (white magic) folklorico and modern dance.  Founded and directed by husband-and-wife team Luiz Badaró and Linda Yudin, the Afro-Brazilian troupe celebrated its 15 th season with six works in a program dubbed “Intersections/Ajê.” Even Badaró, normally heard (on percussion) and not seen strutting, sashayed alongside guest artist Dona Marivalda, his king to her decked-out queen (huge hoop skirt, crown, velvet cape)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
The L.A. Dance Festival materialized in early 2012 out of a frankly chauvinistic fervor to highlight the best homegrown companies together in performance. In unity there is strength, the thinking goes -- although sampler programs, with their 10-minute snatches of choreography, have inherent weaknesses. It was as though festival founder Deborah Brockus was trying to stage a counterattack against the tsunami of excitement generated by Benjamin Millepied's Music Center-supported L.A. Dance Project.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
For the brief moment that she stood atop the eight-story building at UCLA on Friday evening in the soft light of the setting sun, she looked as though she belonged there. This was, after all, the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Center, and the woman might have been, say, an Antony Gormley artwork. She surely seemed a sculpture as she began to tip over. But once at a 90-degree angle to the ground, she walked, casually and with slow ease, down the side of the building as if this were a perfectly normal thing to do. For spectators watching from below, things became confused.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1990 | SHELLEY BAUMSTEN WAGERS
Los Angeles-based Danza Floricanto/USA celebrated its 15th year of Mexican folklorico performances with speeches, a round of "Mananitas" and "Happy Birthday" and a gift to the audience at the San Gabriel Civic Auditorium on Friday night of a delightful new suite of dances from the state of Nayarit.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2013 | By Victoria Looseleaf
Melissa McCarthy and Sandra Bullock aren't the only ones packing heat.  L.A.-based Viver Brasil scorched the Ford Amphitheatre on Saturday with its hybrid moves that mix Bahian Candomblé (white magic) folklorico and modern dance.  Founded and directed by husband-and-wife team Luiz Badaró and Linda Yudin, the Afro-Brazilian troupe celebrated its 15 th season with six works in a program dubbed “Intersections/Ajê.” Even Badaró, normally heard (on percussion) and not seen strutting, sashayed alongside guest artist Dona Marivalda, his king to her decked-out queen (huge hoop skirt, crown, velvet cape)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
The L.A. Dance Festival materialized in early 2012 out of a frankly chauvinistic fervor to highlight the best homegrown companies together in performance. In unity there is strength, the thinking goes -- although sampler programs, with their 10-minute snatches of choreography, have inherent weaknesses. It was as though festival founder Deborah Brockus was trying to stage a counterattack against the tsunami of excitement generated by Benjamin Millepied's Music Center-supported L.A. Dance Project.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
For the brief moment that she stood atop the eight-story building at UCLA on Friday evening in the soft light of the setting sun, she looked as though she belonged there. This was, after all, the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Center, and the woman might have been, say, an Antony Gormley artwork. She surely seemed a sculpture as she began to tip over. But once at a 90-degree angle to the ground, she walked, casually and with slow ease, down the side of the building as if this were a perfectly normal thing to do. For spectators watching from below, things became confused.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2012 | By Laura Bleiberg
What a miserable lot we humans are, wallowing in violence, oppression and cruelty. This was the starting point for Akram Khan's latest ensemble dance, "Vertical Road" (2010), which had its West Coast premiere Friday at Royce Hall, presented by the Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA. The "vertical road" was a spiritual journey, a loose depiction of the writings and philosophies of Rumi, a revered 13th century Persian poet and theologian. Khan, an award-winning British choreographer of Bangladeshi descent, began with the most base of human behaviors, setting the stage for a through-line that all could experience as the search for the divine progressed and the dance unreeled.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By David Ng
Frank Gehry and Placido Domingo will be lending a hand to the National YoungArts Foundation, a nonprofit group that provides financial assistance and other forms of support to aspiring artists. The organization announced this week that it has acquired the Bacardi Tower and Museum buildings in Miami that will serve as its national headquarters. Gehry has been commissioned to design the master plan for the historic campus, the group said. The architect was also named an artistic advisor for the group, along with Domingo and choreographer Bill T. Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012 | By Laura Bleiberg
Choreographer Benjamin Millepied's LA Dance Project will make a sneak-peak debut in July with a performance in the galleries of the Museum of Contemporary Art. Millepied is creating a 30-minute, site-specific duet, “Framework,” to a narrated soundtrack by Los Angeles artist Mark Bradford. The free performances, in conjunction with the MOCA show, “The Painting Factory: Abstraction after Warhol,” are scheduled for July 19, Aug. 2 and 9. Bradford has two large paintings in the exhibition, “Untitled” (2011)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1992 | LEWIS SEGAL
Three days after its world premiere at the Wiltern Theatre, John Selya's ballet "Moondance" boasted an unscheduled new lead on Saturday: Selya himself. Dancing on a previously reviewed American Ballet Theatre mixed bill, corps member Selya replaced injured company principal Johan Renvall at both Saturday performances, with company ballet master David Richardson appearing in Selya's previous (non-dancing) role of the Viking.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL
Fifty years of American modern-dance solos provided a combined history lesson and tour de force in Gregg Lizenbery's flawed but invaluable "Men Dancing" program at Landis Auditorium, Riverside Community College, on Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Laura Bleiberg
Journeying through life is a messy business.  Finding one's authentic place is even messier, if not downright impossible. Life's disorderliness was both a theatrical device and a philosophical theme for New York-based choreographer Faye Driscoll in her latest dance-theater piece, “You're Me.” Driscoll, who grew up in Venice, and Jesse Zaritt, her collaborator and fellow performer, were presented Thursday and Friday by UCLA's Department of...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Marcia Adair, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tucked away in the side streets of Mayfair, the world-famous tailors of Savile Row make gentleman's suiting to order for businessmen, gentry, politicians, oligarchs and Saudi princes. Six miles to the east, in Hackney, lies another temple to old-school English craftsmanship: Freed of London, makers of custom pointe shoes since 1929. In a small workshop flanked by midrise apartment blocks, a no-frills sandwich café and a betting parlor, 12 shoemakers each transform satin, canvas, cardboard, burlap and leather into 40 pairs of pointe shoes each a day. The company was started by cobbler Frederick Freed in 1929 in a Covent Garden shop basement.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|