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November 18, 2002 | Randy Lewis
Can Jamaican DJ and singer Sean Paul do for dancehall music what Bob Marley did for reggae? We'll get an indication this week when Paul's sophomore album, "Dutty Rock," debuts on the pop album chart. It's projected to sell 70,000 to 75,000 during its first week, which should allow it to enter the chart in the Top 20 -- respectable by overall pop music standards, but spectacular in the reggae and dancehall world.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Wycliffe "Steely" Johnson, a keyboardist and producer who helped steer Jamaican music for nearly two decades and modernize the dancehall genre, has died. He was 47. Johnson died Sept. 1 at Brookhaven Memorial Hospital in Patchogue, N.Y., following a heart attack, said Cleveland Browne, a drummer and producer who was the other half of the duo popularly known as Steely and Clevie. Several weeks ago Johnson had surgery for a blood clot in his brain, and he had been treated for kidney problems related to diabetes and hypertension.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN, Don Snowden is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Matt Robinson went to New York in 1982 to attend college, but he may have had his most educational experience on a Brooklyn street corner. "When I would visit friends in Brooklyn, I'd see one guy on the corner of Flatbush and Hawthorne with his (boom) box playing whoever was the cool hip-hop thing," said Robinson, 30, now an independent record producer who founded the underground dance club Funky Reggae when he returned to L.A. in 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2002 | Randy Lewis
Can Jamaican DJ and singer Sean Paul do for dancehall music what Bob Marley did for reggae? We'll get an indication this week when Paul's sophomore album, "Dutty Rock," debuts on the pop album chart. It's projected to sell 70,000 to 75,000 during its first week, which should allow it to enter the chart in the Top 20 -- respectable by overall pop music standards, but spectacular in the reggae and dancehall world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Wycliffe "Steely" Johnson, a keyboardist and producer who helped steer Jamaican music for nearly two decades and modernize the dancehall genre, has died. He was 47. Johnson died Sept. 1 at Brookhaven Memorial Hospital in Patchogue, N.Y., following a heart attack, said Cleveland Browne, a drummer and producer who was the other half of the duo popularly known as Steely and Clevie. Several weeks ago Johnson had surgery for a blood clot in his brain, and he had been treated for kidney problems related to diabetes and hypertension.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2005 | Richard Cromelin
In a continuation of the battle over alleged anti-gay lyrics in Jamaican dance-hall music, the House of Blues in West Hollywood has canceled another concert by a controversial Jamaican singer. Sizzla's Sept. 12 concert at the club was scrapped this week after protests by the L.A. Gay and Lesbian Center, an action that mirrors an episode last year when a show by reggae singer Capleton met the same fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1999 | MARC WEINGARTEN
In the liner notes to its debut album, "Rafi's Revenge," Asian Dub Foundation acknowledges the Beastie Boys, Cornershop, reggae artist Sizzla and the late Pakistani singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan as influences. So it came as no surprise to find the London-based quintet--whose members are of Indian and Pakistani heritage--blending both B-boy posturing and the modal scales of Indian devotional music into its furious electro-dub assault at the Troubadour on Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
A Hollywood club has canceled a performance by Buju Banton, a reggae star whose violent lyrics about gays and lesbians have made him a flashpoint figure. Adam Manacker, general manager of the Highland nightclub and restaurant, said Thursday that e-mail complaints and concerned callers in recent days had prompted him to research Banton's past and call off the Oct. 2 show. Refunds are available through the vendor where the tickets were purchased.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1996 | CHEO HODARI COKER
London-born reggae singer Maxi Priest bounced onto the House of Blues stage Wednesday with his flowing dreadlocks reaching his waistline and his feel-good Rastaman vibrations filling the room. By the time the self-proclaimed "man with the fun," finished his two-hour set, there was no doubt as to his power as a performer and the beauty of his singing voice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2000 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One thing you can count on at the annual Doheny Days music festival: an eclectic lineup with a few cool surprises. Leaving behind last year's aggressive alt-rock and rap-rock, the fourth annual Doheny Days, taking place Sept. 16-17 in Dana Point, features a mix of 20 rock, blues and reggae acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN, Don Snowden is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Matt Robinson went to New York in 1982 to attend college, but he may have had his most educational experience on a Brooklyn street corner. "When I would visit friends in Brooklyn, I'd see one guy on the corner of Flatbush and Hawthorne with his (boom) box playing whoever was the cool hip-hop thing," said Robinson, 30, now an independent record producer who founded the underground dance club Funky Reggae when he returned to L.A. in 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1993 | DENNIS HUNT
Dancehall reggae music was a sidelight in Shabba Ranks' headlining set Friday night at the Hollywood Palladium. The real star was sex. The steamy Jamaican rapper-singer tantalized the audience with crude lyrics and suggestive moves, topping things off with a strip tease and some of the tawdriest taunts this side of Hustler magazine. Judging from the ecstatic squeals of the female fans, his strip routines scored big.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | DON SNOWDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three years ago, Tiger seemed destined to join the ranks of dancehall reggae's flash-in-the-pan stars. The distinctive growl and manic delivery of the Jamaican deejay, who headlines the first night of the three-day "Bob Marley Birthday Celebration" Friday at the Long Beach Arena, took Jamaican music by storm in 1986.
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