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NEWS
October 24, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration on Wednesday denounced a Republican-sponsored civil rights compromise as a "quota bill" and threatened to veto the controversial measure--even though the Senate has yet to begin debating it. A toughly worded "statement of Administration policy" on the proposal offered by Sen. John C. Danforth (R-Mo.) was issued by the Office of Management and Budget in coordination with senior advisers to the President.
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NEWS
October 7, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas has "categorically denied" allegations by a University of Oklahoma law professor that he sexually harassed her during the two years she worked for him in Washington, the nominee's chief Senate supporter said Sunday. Calling the charges "an eleventh-hour attack more typical of a political campaign," Sen. John C. Danforth (R-Mo.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebuffed again by the Administration in his efforts to broker a compromise on a civil rights bill, Sen. John C. Danforth (R-Mo.) said Tuesday he and his GOP allies will now work on a strategy to override the expected veto by President Bush. Democratic leaders, also despairing of a compromise, have joined the effort by scheduling a Senate vote on the bill next week, hoping to achieve the two-thirds majority needed to make it veto-proof.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The allegation that Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas billed the government for up to a dozen personal trips will be investigated by the Senate Judiciary Committee at Thomas' confirmation hearings this week, a Democratic member of the panel said Sunday. Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) said that Thomas' travel as head of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission during the Ronald Reagan Administration could be an issue, although Thomas' chief Senate sponsor, Sen. John C. Danforth (R-Mo.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moderate Republican Sen. John C. Danforth, seeking to salvage a congressional civil rights bill, said Wednesday that it is now up to President Bush to decide whether he wants the legislation and is willing to make a compromise to get it. If Bush will agree to adopt his plan for resolving a key dispute over job discrimination safeguards, a compromise measure can be adopted swiftly, Danforth told reporters at a breakfast session. "This policy issue is ripe for decision . . .
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A compromise civil rights bill offered by moderate Republican Sen. John C. Danforth of Missouri came under heavy fire Monday from critics on both sides of the debate, dashing hopes for quick agreement to break a deadlock between President Bush and Democratic congressional leaders. White House officials have balked at embracing the plan recommended by Danforth and eight other GOP senators.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At a crucial point in the battle over a civil rights bill, the leading Republican voice on the issue may not be coming from the White House but rather from the Senate office of mild-mannered John C. Danforth of Missouri.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1989
The well-kept secret of the Bush bombshell dropped at the very first session of the historic summit--that the 20th summer Olympics be held in Berlin--had little connection to the weighty work at hand (Part A, Dec. 3). It was no great appetizer for the momentous menu of world alignment lying ahead. It demonstrated Bush's unawareness of the sensitivity, both East and West Europe have to the German problem. He likes throwing a wild card in the deck, as in Danforth (Quayle). Did Bush try to preempt the usual Gorbachev by a bold announcement of worldwide significance?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989
The truth about "affirmative action" is that we've always had it. It's not a new-fangled liberal idea to help minorities, as many claim. The "old boy network"--nepotism, cronyism, member-of-the-club and alumni-ism to help favored sons--was the most successful affirmative action program ever devised. The only difference is the recipients of this affirmative action were wealthy white males . . . and still are! Do you think J. Danforth Quayle got ahead on "merit"? The question is not whether we will love "affirmative action," but who it will benefit.
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