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Dangerous Dogs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1998
"Pet Killed, Woman Bitten by Stray Pit Bull Mixes," Nov. 7. Isn't it time the Los Angeles City Council proposed a "dangerous dog" ordinance? Through no fault of the pit bull or in some cases their owners, pit bulls have characteristics that are unique from all other domestic dog breeds. One of those characteristics is that when they attack a person or animal, they attack to kill. To add, these attacks are generally unprovoked. Is it no surprise then, that pit bulls and pit bull crossbreeds account for the most deaths, maimings and bodily harm compared with all other dog breeds?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Orange County supervisors on Tuesday are slated to consider an ordinance that would create  a Megan's Law-style website for dangerous dogs. The website probably would list the addresses of homes where dogs deemed to be dangerous or vicious are being kept, along with a description of each animal and how it got into trouble. If county supervisors approve the proposal , the website would cover dogs being kept in the 17 cities and unincorporated areas served by OC Animal Care, said Ryan Drabek, spokesman for the county agency.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1997
Regarding Scott Hadly's article "Dog Bites on the Rise" (May 14): As a concerned citizen, parent and dog owner, I caution the use of dog trainers as a definitive source for information concerning the rising instance of vicious animal attacks. To say that dog trainers have an agenda and a clouded vision of reality is an understatement. In the equation of the problem of dog bites, of course the owner is the biggest variable. For example, owners who don't train their animals. Owners who disregard leash laws and inflict their bad manners on others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
Orange County won't be creating a Megan's Law-style website for dangerous dogs any time soon. The county Board of Supervisors had been considering creating an online database listing the addresses of homes where dangerous dogs are kept, but on Tuesday a majority of supervisors said they don't support such a site. “I think that whole area needs a lot more study before we go in that direction,” said Supervisor Patricia Bates. The website had been included in a proposed ordinance defining vicious and potentially dangerous dogs and outlining the county's recourses for dealing with them.
OPINION
August 14, 2011
By Los Angeles County ordinance, a dog can be labeled "potentially dangerous" if it threatens or attacks a person without provocation, or if it leaves its owner's property and injures or kills someone else's pet. A dog can be labeled "vicious" if it severely injures or kills a person. For years, the county's Department of Animal Care and Control took complaints about dangerous dogs that its officers deemed legitimate to Los Angeles County Superior Court for a judge to decide. But late last month, the county Board of Supervisors voted to amend the ordinance to allow the department to settle such complaints through administrative hearings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Nearly two months after two 100-pound Rottweilers mauled a 6-year-old boy, the City Council this week unanimously approved a vicious-dog ordinance that officials believe is the strictest in Orange County. The new law allows animal control officers to destroy a dog that is declared vicious if the animal is involved in an unprovoked attack that severely injures or kills a person.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The Irish government has ordered that all potentially dangerous dogs be muzzled and leashed. And officials of Hamburg, Germany, have decided to treat dogs bred for fighting as if they were guns. Ortwin Runde, head of Hamburg's Social Ministry, said Tuesday that owners of fighting dogs must have a permit, as is the case with firearms. People with criminal convictions will be denied permits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987
I feel compelled to offer an opinion on the subject of pit bull dogs. As an owner for over 10 years of both a Staffordshire and American pit bull and father of infant children, I am convinced that the owners, not the dogs, are to blame for the horrible maulings and extremely prejudiced reputation that these dogs have acquired. I am especially disappointed that the Times has taken the attitude that an entire breed of animal is "dangerous." These dogs are, by nature, aggressive and strong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
Orange County won't be creating a Megan's Law-style website for dangerous dogs any time soon. The county Board of Supervisors had been considering creating an online database listing the addresses of homes where dangerous dogs are kept, but on Tuesday a majority of supervisors said they don't support such a site. “I think that whole area needs a lot more study before we go in that direction,” said Supervisor Patricia Bates. The website had been included in a proposed ordinance defining vicious and potentially dangerous dogs and outlining the county's recourses for dealing with them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Larry Hill is the dean of a small network of dog trainers who are out to save the bully breeds - pit bulls, mastiffs and Rottweilers - of South Los Angeles. His specialty is tough dogs in tough neighborhoods. In his professional work and monthly free classes, he takes lunging, yelping masses of dog flesh and molds them into gentle companions. Hill's mantra is there is nothing wrong with the dogs. It's the owners who have the problem, as I discovered one Saturday morning at St. Andrews Recreation Center in Gramercy Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Orange County may soon have a Megan's Law-style website for dangerous dogs. The website probably would list the addresses of homes where dogs deemed to be dangerous or vicious are being kept, along with a description of each animal and how it got into trouble in the first place. "We know where dangerous sex offenders are living in our community," county Supervisor Todd Spitzer said. "The public has the right to know where owners are harboring a dog declared vicious or dangerous.
OPINION
August 8, 2013
The owner of several pit bulls that mauled a woman to death in the Antelope Valley in May was arraigned Wednesday in an L.A. County courtroom on charges of murder and animal owner negligence. This is exactly the way the authorities should deal with such a horrific attack by dogs when there is evidence -- as there is in this case -- that the owner may have ignored or encouraged his dogs' aggressive behavior or failed to adequately secure them. When owners of dogs that have attacked people are found to have been negligent, they should be held strictly accountable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2013 | Kate Mather, Abby Sewell and Matt Stevens
Littlerock is one of those small Antelope Valley towns that melt into the desert, a place of few people but many dogs. Houses surrounded by chain-link fences bear "no trespassing" and "beware of dog" signs. A chorus of barks and growls greets passersby. Numerous strays also roam the desert. Residents say Littlerock has become a dumping ground for unwanted dogs. "A car will come down the street at 40 mph, slow down and a door will open," said longtime resident David Cleveland.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Carla Hall
The fatal attack on a woman walking in the Antelope Valley community of Littlerock by four pit bulls last week has prompted Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich to ask the  county Department of Animal Care and Control to look into ways to better deal with the problem of vicious dogs prowling the streets. Roaming dogs in general are a problem in the Antelope Valley, where the landscape seems to invite careless or even cruel behavior. “People go out there and abandon their dogs in the desert,” Marcia Mayeda, the director of Animal Care and Control, told me. “They abandon horses too. We find them - skin and bones.” People also sometimes let their dogs run loose, thinking that's fine in a rather rural area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Larry Hill is the dean of a small network of dog trainers who are out to save the bully breeds - pit bulls, mastiffs and Rottweilers - of South Los Angeles. His specialty is tough dogs in tough neighborhoods. In his professional work and monthly free classes, he takes lunging, yelping masses of dog flesh and molds them into gentle companions. Hill's mantra is there is nothing wrong with the dogs. It's the owners who have the problem, as I discovered one Saturday morning at St. Andrews Recreation Center in Gramercy Park.
OPINION
August 14, 2011
By Los Angeles County ordinance, a dog can be labeled "potentially dangerous" if it threatens or attacks a person without provocation, or if it leaves its owner's property and injures or kills someone else's pet. A dog can be labeled "vicious" if it severely injures or kills a person. For years, the county's Department of Animal Care and Control took complaints about dangerous dogs that its officers deemed legitimate to Los Angeles County Superior Court for a judge to decide. But late last month, the county Board of Supervisors voted to amend the ordinance to allow the department to settle such complaints through administrative hearings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1987
At a time of public worry about attacks by pit bullterriers, the Board of Supervisors directed the county Health Care Agency on Tuesday to see whether existing laws are sufficient to protect people from aggressive dogs. "As the result of some well-publicized dog attacks, there has been an increase in concern regarding the threat of potentially dangerous dogs," Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder said. She said some people contend that the county's law regulating aggressive dogs is inadequate.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
Scooby got his due Thursday, as the governor signed into law a requirement that antifreeze have a bitter taste to deter dogs from lapping it up. Scooby, a golden retriever from Bernalillo, N.M., had to be destroyed in 2003 after drinking the poisonous liquid. His death prompted an Albuquerque ordinance a year ago, and now the statewide requirement. "Scooby's Law is now official," Gov. Bill Richardson said at a ceremony in his office.
OPINION
August 25, 2002
It's a tragic story, one that shouldn't be repeated. But dog attacks continue despite hard talk by authorities and the inevitable wave of media coverage. This time, the victim was a helpless 2-year-old boy in a La Habra neighborhood who was savagely mauled by a pit bull. Though the boy is now in stable condition, his scalp was torn from his head; his forehead, cheek, chest, legs and eyelid were punctured. Doctors say the boy's greatest danger now is infection.
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