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Daniel Ellsberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | Gary Goldstein
In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg, a former Marine, Pentagon employee and military analyst, performed one of the most daring whistle-blowing acts of the century: Leaking ex-employer Rand Corp.'s copies of the top-secret Pentagon Papers to the New York Times (and subsequently other major dailies) in order to expose the truth -- or, more specifically, the lies -- behind America's longtime involvement in the Vietnam conflict. The gripping story of how hawk-turned-dove Ellsberg's explosive actions circuitously led to the impeachment of Richard Nixon and, in turn, an end to the Vietnam War is comprehensively detailed in Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith's evocative documentary "The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers."
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OPINION
June 12, 2013
Re "Hero or criminal?," Editorial, June 11, and "Analyst admits to cyber-spying leaks," June 10 Senate Intelligence Committee head Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) has called Edward J. Snowden's admitted leaking of the National Security Agency's extensive surveillance of Americans an act of treason. That is totally wrong. Snowden is a patriot of the highest order; he did not commit an act of treason. Feinstein is the one guilty of treason for allowing all the spying and not blowing the whistle herself when she had knowledge of this activity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Daniel Ellsberg remembers the day he learned that time may indeed heal all wounds. "By the end of the Cold War, around 1989 or so," recalls Ellsberg, who had been despised and disowned in the '70s for leaking classified documents about the Vietnam War, "I'd be in a meeting with someone, and they wouldn't leave the room. " This small triumph ? he offers a shy smile ? may not sound like cause for celebration. But when you've been called "the most dangerous man in America" by Henry Kissinger, you take your good news where you can get it. Ellsberg's growing unease about the Vietnam War, his decision to leak the 7,000-page Pentagon Papers to the press and members of Congress, and the turmoil he experienced afterward are the subjects of POV's "The Most Dangerous Man in America," an Academy Award-nominated documentary that PBS broadcasts Tuesday.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Edward J. Snowden is "a low-level disenchanted punk," says LA Observed's Marc Lacter. In the New York Times, David Brooks notes that Snowden wasn't very neighborly or much of a loving son to his mother. A front-page story Tuesday in the L.A. Times begins : "He was a high school dropout, sometime junior college student and failed Army recruit. " It's safe to say the focus of the debate over the National Security Agency's massive electronic surveillance programs has shifted to the man who unmasked himself as the leaker.  This discussion will continue on Wednesday's letters page, and most of the readers who have written so far take a more positive view of Snowden than the observations above.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years after he released confidential government documents detailing the secret history of the Vietnam War, Daniel Ellsberg was still at it Thursday, calling for the release of a new generation of "Pentagon Papers" on the Persian Gulf War.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Runaways Sony, $27.96; Blu-ray, $34.95 First time writer-director Floria Sigismondi turns the sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll lifestyle of the all-girl teen-rock act the Runaways into an impressionistic, wildly erratic art film, more about '70s decadence than biopic coherence. Any scene where the gals storm the stage and rock out is thrilling, and Michael Shannon gives another in his recent string of knockout performances as the band's guru-manager-leech, Kim Fowley. But the movie provides scant details about the band's brief rise to fame, and it shortchanges any character who's not Cherie Currie or Joan Jett.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
He leaked the Pentagon papers. He topped the Nixon Enemies A-list. His just-released memoir has been made into a Hollywood movie. He's an icon -- depending on how you see him -- as hero, whistleblower or traitor. So what more does one of the world's most famous non-incarcerated document thieves want? Daniel Ellsberg still wants to matter. The silver-haired 72-year-old former RAND policy wonk is as anti-establishment as ever.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
"Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers." By Daniel Ellsberg Viking Press (October 2002) I usually read more than one at a time; now, I'm reading four books. One of the best is Daniel Ellsberg's memoir. It's a history of the man and a time that has startling relevance to today. -- Michael York, actor
NEWS
March 22, 2008
Hecht obituary: The obituary in Thursday's California section of Richard Hecht, who served in the Los Angeles County district attorney's office, said he headed the local 1973 investigation into the break-in at the Beverly Hills office of psychiatrist Daniel Ellsberg. Ellsberg was a patient of the psychiatrist.
NEWS
March 27, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two Nobel Peace Prize winners and Vietnam War activist Daniel Ellsberg were among 65 people arrested near the White House in antiwar protests. The protesters climbed over police barricades closing off Lafayette Park, across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House, and sang and prayed until they were taken into custody.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Daniel Ellsberg remembers the day he learned that time may indeed heal all wounds. "By the end of the Cold War, around 1989 or so," recalls Ellsberg, who had been despised and disowned in the '70s for leaking classified documents about the Vietnam War, "I'd be in a meeting with someone, and they wouldn't leave the room. " This small triumph ? he offers a shy smile ? may not sound like cause for celebration. But when you've been called "the most dangerous man in America" by Henry Kissinger, you take your good news where you can get it. Ellsberg's growing unease about the Vietnam War, his decision to leak the 7,000-page Pentagon Papers to the press and members of Congress, and the turmoil he experienced afterward are the subjects of POV's "The Most Dangerous Man in America," an Academy Award-nominated documentary that PBS broadcasts Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Runaways Sony, $27.96; Blu-ray, $34.95 First time writer-director Floria Sigismondi turns the sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll lifestyle of the all-girl teen-rock act the Runaways into an impressionistic, wildly erratic art film, more about '70s decadence than biopic coherence. Any scene where the gals storm the stage and rock out is thrilling, and Michael Shannon gives another in his recent string of knockout performances as the band's guru-manager-leech, Kim Fowley. But the movie provides scant details about the band's brief rise to fame, and it shortchanges any character who's not Cherie Currie or Joan Jett.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | Gary Goldstein
In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg, a former Marine, Pentagon employee and military analyst, performed one of the most daring whistle-blowing acts of the century: Leaking ex-employer Rand Corp.'s copies of the top-secret Pentagon Papers to the New York Times (and subsequently other major dailies) in order to expose the truth -- or, more specifically, the lies -- behind America's longtime involvement in the Vietnam conflict. The gripping story of how hawk-turned-dove Ellsberg's explosive actions circuitously led to the impeachment of Richard Nixon and, in turn, an end to the Vietnam War is comprehensively detailed in Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith's evocative documentary "The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers."
NEWS
March 22, 2008
Hecht obituary: The obituary in Thursday's California section of Richard Hecht, who served in the Los Angeles County district attorney's office, said he headed the local 1973 investigation into the break-in at the Beverly Hills office of psychiatrist Daniel Ellsberg. Ellsberg was a patient of the psychiatrist.
OPINION
June 16, 2006
Re "Where are Iraq's Pentagon Papers?" Current, June 11 Indeed, where are Iraq's Pentagon Papers? Daniel Ellsberg suggests that there are "at the very least, hundreds of civilian and military officials" who have access to papers that would reveal "actual war crimes" committed by this administration. Who among them will have the moral courage to take the personal risk that Ellsberg did and come forward to stop the senseless killing? Could it be that with the Patriot Act hanging over us, such a person would not be as lucky as Ellsberg was?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2006 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge William Matthew Byrne Jr., a leading jurist and an ambassador of the law best known for his role in ending the trial of Pentagon Papers defendant Daniel Ellsberg after disclosing government misconduct in the case, died of pulmonary fibrosis Thursday at his Los Feliz home. He was 75. Byrne became the youngest judge ever appointed to the federal bench when he was confirmed in 1971 at age 40.
NEWS
July 5, 1985
A federal magistrate has ordered antiwar activist Daniel Ellsberg to spend two days in jail or pay a $50 fine for blocking an entrance to a government building during a protest in San Francisco. Ellsberg, 54, who was accused of leaking the government's classified Pentagon Papers to the news media in 1971, told reporters after a 40-minute hearing that he plans to go to jail.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
He leaked the Pentagon papers. He topped the Nixon Enemies A-list. His just-released memoir has been made into a Hollywood movie. He's an icon -- depending on how you see him -- as hero, whistleblower or traitor. So what more does one of the world's most famous non-incarcerated document thieves want? Daniel Ellsberg still wants to matter. The silver-haired 72-year-old former RAND policy wonk is as anti-establishment as ever.
NEWS
March 27, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two Nobel Peace Prize winners and Vietnam War activist Daniel Ellsberg were among 65 people arrested near the White House in antiwar protests. The protesters climbed over police barricades closing off Lafayette Park, across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House, and sang and prayed until they were taken into custody.
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