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Daniel Henning

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January 27, 2008 | David Ng, Times Staff Writer
On a mostly bare stage, two actors are rehearsing the perfect murder. One of them mimes driving an automobile while the other searches for a young victim to lure into the back seat. The year is 1924. Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb are about to make history as the country's most famous thrill killers. During the rehearsal, the director and playwright, Daniel Henning, looks over the actors' shoulders, choreographing their eye movements at each turn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Playwright Stephen Karam has made a splash off-Broadway with one play and been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize with another. But for memorable moments in his stage career, he says there's nothing quite like his teenage triumphs in the Blank Theatre's annual young playwrights competition and festival. "When you see people taking your work seriously at that age, it makes a big impression," said Karam, 32. "For the first time I thought of myself as a real writer. " For two decades, the small, Hollywood-based Blank has presented plays and musicals by students 19 and younger with directors such as Barbara Bain and Jeremy Sisto, mentors such as Garry Marshall and Terrence McNally and actors such as Sarah Michelle Gellar, Debra Messing and Chris Pine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Playwright Stephen Karam has made a splash off-Broadway with one play and been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize with another. But for memorable moments in his stage career, he says there's nothing quite like his teenage triumphs in the Blank Theatre's annual young playwrights competition and festival. "When you see people taking your work seriously at that age, it makes a big impression," said Karam, 32. "For the first time I thought of myself as a real writer. " For two decades, the small, Hollywood-based Blank has presented plays and musicals by students 19 and younger with directors such as Barbara Bain and Jeremy Sisto, mentors such as Garry Marshall and Terrence McNally and actors such as Sarah Michelle Gellar, Debra Messing and Chris Pine.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2010 | By Martin Rubin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Most readers know the Swedish author Henning Mankell either for his political views ? he is a strident critic of Israel and participated in the protest flotilla attempting to run its Gaza blockade earlier this year ? or for his mysteries featuring Inspector Kurt Wallander. But there is a lot more to Mankell both as a writer and as an activist. The author of more than a dozen novels and many plays and television films (including his current project, a program about his father-in-law Ingmar Bergman)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2010 | By Martin Rubin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Most readers know the Swedish author Henning Mankell either for his political views ? he is a strident critic of Israel and participated in the protest flotilla attempting to run its Gaza blockade earlier this year ? or for his mysteries featuring Inspector Kurt Wallander. But there is a lot more to Mankell both as a writer and as an activist. The author of more than a dozen novels and many plays and television films (including his current project, a program about his father-in-law Ingmar Bergman)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1998 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
The metal pipe seemed to flash out of nowhere. He felt an explosion in his forehead and, a heartbeat later, crashed to the ground, his face bathed in crimson. As Daniel Henning describes the awful night he was mugged in Manhattan in 1988, he slips in bits of unexpected humor, referring to the blow as "the bonk" and laughing at his decision to dress for Halloween that year as Frankenstein, adding gory fake stitches to real ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
The writers responsible for "Young Playwrights Mainstage 95," sponsored by the Blank Theatre Company, are all 17 or 18 years old--ripe ages for an actor or rock star, perhaps, but pretty young indeed for a playwright. This bill at the Hudson Theatre of three one-acts--chosen from winners of a local playwriting competition--proves that theatrical talent can be evident at that early age. Unfortunately, so can many of the problems that dog far more experienced dramatists.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
"A Night Out With Young Playwrights" at the 2nd Stage features two winning entries from the Blank Theatre Company's annual Young Playwrights Festival. The two teen-penned playlets, which deal with adolescent sexuality and gender confusion, are precocious, earnest and sentimental to a fault.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1996 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From the first vibrant measure of "Alive," the song that opens "Sky's End," Blank Theatre Company's latest offering at the 2nd Stage Theatre, fans of musicals may rejoice. Although Joseph Alan Drymala, who wrote the book, music and lyrics, tends to favor overwrought emotions and almost melodramatic plotting, he is unmistakably a promising new talent in the musical theater world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1995 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer.
The first cast recording of an L.A. 99-seat musical revival has hit the racks: a CD of "The Cradle Will Rock," the 1937 Marc Blitzstein musical, as presented last year by Blank Theatre Co. at the Off Ramp Theatre in Hollywood. It's the second first for that show's recording history--"The Cradle Will Rock" also was the first Broadway musical to receive an original cast album, in 1938. The new CD is on the Hollywood-based Lockett-Palmer label.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2008 | David Ng, Times Staff Writer
On a mostly bare stage, two actors are rehearsing the perfect murder. One of them mimes driving an automobile while the other searches for a young victim to lure into the back seat. The year is 1924. Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb are about to make history as the country's most famous thrill killers. During the rehearsal, the director and playwright, Daniel Henning, looks over the actors' shoulders, choreographing their eye movements at each turn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1998 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
The metal pipe seemed to flash out of nowhere. He felt an explosion in his forehead and, a heartbeat later, crashed to the ground, his face bathed in crimson. As Daniel Henning describes the awful night he was mugged in Manhattan in 1988, he slips in bits of unexpected humor, referring to the blow as "the bonk" and laughing at his decision to dress for Halloween that year as Frankenstein, adding gory fake stitches to real ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1999
Edward Weston opened his first photography studio in Tropico--now Glendale--in 1911, just as Modernism was reaching California. A new exhibition opening today, "Edward Weston: Photography and Modernism," traces how Weston's work became increasing influenced and eventually influential in the Modernist arena.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2000 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid endless debate over the proliferating horror of school shootings, one perspective in short supply is that of the most impacted demographic--teenagers. The Blank Theatre Company compensates for some of that neglect with an all-professional staging of 19-year-old Victor Kaufold's "The Why" at the Hudson Mainstage Theatre. A finalist in the Blank Theatre's Young Playwrights Festival, Kaufold's play articulately explores this urgent issue.
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