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WORLD
February 6, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman and Paul Richter
JERUSALEM - Emerging from a black limousine, the tall man in the bushy gray wig lectures a small crowd of Israelis on how their holy city of Jerusalem belongs to followers of all religions - "Jews, Christians, Muslims, Buddhists, Klingons and Hobbits. " He asks a young passerby, "Do you think I deserve a Nobel Prize?" The two-minute spoof video, released on YouTube this week by ultranationalist Israelis, is the latest sign of how critics of a possible Mideast peace deal have focused their ire on the effort's chief champion, U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry.
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WORLD
February 6, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman and Paul Richter
JERUSALEM - Emerging from a black limousine, the tall man in the bushy gray wig lectures a small crowd of Israelis on how their holy city of Jerusalem belongs to followers of all religions - "Jews, Christians, Muslims, Buddhists, Klingons and Hobbits. " He asks a young passerby, "Do you think I deserve a Nobel Prize?" The two-minute spoof video, released on YouTube this week by ultranationalist Israelis, is the latest sign of how critics of a possible Mideast peace deal have focused their ire on the effort's chief champion, U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry.
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NEWS
February 16, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Other American officials had said as much before, but the reaction to a comment by new U.S. Ambassador Daniel Kurtzer was swift and vehement: How dare he say that? At Kurtzer's debut news conference here, the career diplomat was asked about Egypt's decision to boycott a U.S.-sponsored regional economic summit to protest Israel's alleged foot-dragging in peace talks. He answered that the decision was, in his opinion, a "serious mistake."
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Other American officials had said as much before, but the reaction to a comment by new U.S. Ambassador Daniel Kurtzer was swift and vehement: How dare he say that? At Kurtzer's debut news conference here, the career diplomat was asked about Egypt's decision to boycott a U.S.-sponsored regional economic summit to protest Israel's alleged foot-dragging in peace talks. He answered that the decision was, in his opinion, a "serious mistake."
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Across Israel, people expressed solidarity with the United States, where many have relatives and friends. Israel Radio reported that at least two Israelis were on one of the planes that were hijacked and flown into the World Trade Center. Two more Israelis were reportedly working in the center and are missing. In Jerusalem, U.S. Ambassador Daniel Kurtzer participated in a ceremony marking the reopening of Sbarro, the pizza restaurant blown up by an Islamic militant last month.
WORLD
September 15, 2003 | From Reuters
Israeli defense officials, apparently bowing to U.S. demands, said Sunday that they had revised the planned course of a West Bank security barrier so that it would leave out a major Jewish settlement. The new blueprint, presented by Israeli Defense Minister Shaul Mofaz to U.S. Ambassador Daniel Kurtzer last week, would exclude the settlement of Ariel, about 12 miles inside the West Bank, a defense official said.
WORLD
October 14, 2002 | From Associated Press
A Palestinian militant whose clan has been targeted by Israeli security forces was killed Sunday when a public telephone exploded in his hand -- one of six Palestinians to die in a day of violence, Palestinians said. Mohammed Shtewie Abayat was on the phone outside Beit Jala Hospital near the West Bank city of Bethlehem when the apparatus blew up, killing him, according to doctors. Relatives said he belonged to a militia linked to Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat's Fatah movement.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first day of his sixth Mideast shuttle, Secretary of State Warren Christopher talked with Israeli leaders Monday and predicted that the peace process is close to realizing its goal. "The Arab-Israeli conflict, one of the most longstanding and most intractable conflicts of this entire century, is drawing to an end," he said after meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. "There will be difficulties on the path ahead.
WORLD
August 14, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration faces mounting pressure to sanction the Egyptian military for its violent crackdown on opponents, even though officials refrained from any punitive action Wednesday. As the Egyptian government declared emergency law and its security forces killed dozens of Islamist protesters, U.S. officials condemned the actions and said they were weighing whether to call off a large-scale joint military exercise or cut $1.5 billion in aid. Secretary of State John F. Kerry, in a brief appearance Wednesday afternoon at the State Department, said the violence was “deplorable” and stressed the administration's opposition to the imposition of emergency law. But the administration also made clear it was deeply reluctant to move too forcefully against the military government that took power last month, fearing that such an action could jeopardize U.S. security interests in the region and diminish what limited leverage Washington has. U.S. officials have been trying to avoid taking sides with either the military or the elected Islamist government that was ousted last month, as the Obama administration has sought to avoid perceptions that it is interfering in Egyptian politics for its own ends.
WORLD
February 20, 2004 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon sought Thursday to reassure three American envoys that Israel did not want to abandon the U.S.-backed peace blueprint known as the "road map," but made it clear that he was readying steps of his own should that effort fail. Sharon held a three-hour meeting with the high-level U.S.
WORLD
December 10, 2003 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
The government of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon reacted defiantly Tuesday to a U.N. General Assembly vote asking the International Court of Justice to rule on the legality of a barrier that Israel is building around the West Bank. Meanwhile, domestic criticism of the fence mounted, with one Israeli commentator saying construction of the barrier, which cuts tens of thousands of Palestinians off from family and livelihoods, could turn Israel into a "leper state."
NEWS
July 5, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the United States was celebrating its liberty Tuesday, a prominent Egyptian American scholar was under lock and key in Cairo while police investigated charges related to a documentary he was making about free elections. The unexpected arrest last week of Saad Eddin Ibrahim, a sociologist and one of this country's leading exponents of tolerance toward the Coptic Christian minority, sent a shiver through the ranks of independent civic organizations here.
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