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February 9, 2003 | Carla Kaplan, Carla Kaplan teaches at the University of Southern California. Her most recent book is "Zora Neale Hurston: A Life in Letters."
In his sixth novel, cultural historian Theodore Roszak takes on the religious right, "the Lord's sour-pussed people," as the novel's main character describes them. "The Devil and Daniel Silverman" extends a Roszak tradition of rewriting classics, including Roszak's best novel, "The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein," Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" retold from the fiancee's perspective.
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February 9, 2003 | Carla Kaplan, Carla Kaplan teaches at the University of Southern California. Her most recent book is "Zora Neale Hurston: A Life in Letters."
In his sixth novel, cultural historian Theodore Roszak takes on the religious right, "the Lord's sour-pussed people," as the novel's main character describes them. "The Devil and Daniel Silverman" extends a Roszak tradition of rewriting classics, including Roszak's best novel, "The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein," Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" retold from the fiancee's perspective.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Crime doesn't pay, but cooperating with the authorities can pay off. That seems to be a lesson in the case of the "Yuppie Five," the young Wall Street professionals nabbed two years ago as an insider trading ring. Two of the former defendants are now selling cars, a third has been driving a cab and another is trying to make his way as a financial consultant. But the ring member who secretly taped his confederates to gather evidence for authorities has been cleared to practice law in two states.
HEALTH
October 9, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Chemotherapy can cause changes in the brain's metabolism and blood flow that can last as long as 10 years, a discovery that may explain the mental fog and confusion that affect many cancer survivors, researchers said Thursday. The researchers, from UCLA, found that women who had undergone chemotherapy five to 10 years earlier had lower metabolism in a key region of the frontal cortex.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1987
The two defendants, who pleaded guilty last June to reaping $160,000 in illegal profits, were given fines of $25,000 each in federal court in White Plains, N.Y. Morton Shapiro, 25, a former stockbroker with Moseley, Hallgarten, Estabrook & Weeden, was sentenced to two months in jail and ordered to pay a $25,000 fine. Daniel Silverman, 24, was sentenced to three years probation, a $25,000 fine and ordered to provide 250 hours of community service.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
A federal mediator on Thursday rejected a union's claim that ABC's lockout of 2,200 behind-the-scenes employees due to a labor dispute was illegal. Although the decision was a blow to the National Assn. of Broadcast Employees and Technicians, the union and ABC will return to the bargaining table today. NABET's camera operators, producers and editors have been working without a contract since March 31, 1997. They staged a one-day strike over health benefits on Nov.
SPORTS
November 5, 1985 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
The major league baseball players' union has filed an unfair-labor-practice claim against baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth, the 26 club owners and the owners' Player Relations Committee, charging that they illegally tried to go around the union to institute a players' drug testing program, union leader Donald Fehr said Monday. Fehr added that a second complaint to the National Labor Relations Board charges that the owners' Oct.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Crime doesn't pay, but cooperating with the authorities can pay off. That seems to be a lesson in the case of the "Yuppie Five," the young Wall Street professionals nabbed two years ago as an insider trading ring. Two of the former defendants are now selling cars, a third has been driving a cab and another is trying to make his way as a financial consultant. But the ring member who secretly taped his confederates to gather evidence for authorities has been cleared to practice law in two states.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1986 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD, Times Staff Writer
Michael N. David, the key figure in the so-called Yuppie Five insider trading case, has agreed to pay as much as $150,000 through an unusual 11-year payback plan to settle civil charges filed here Wednesday by the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1986 | TONY ROBINSON, Times Staff Writer
The last of the so-called Yuppie Five accused of insider trading pleaded guilty Wednesday to four criminal charges, including one count each of conspiracy, securities fraud, mail fraud and obstruction of justice. Michael N. David, 28, a former associate with the New York law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison and a $1-million fine. U.S. District Judge John F. Keenan scheduled sentencing for March 4.
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