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Danielle Steel

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Danielle Steel has written 130 books and is by all accounts a success, but she still deals with condescension from men at dinner parties. The 65-year-old Steel took to her blog to write a post, "Are you still a Brain Surgeon?" where she details her experiences with men who belittle her writing career, and those of her female entrepreneur friend. According to Steel, the situation happens this way: She will run into a man that she hasn't seen for awhile. He will immediately ask, "So, are you still writing?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Danielle Steel has written 130 books and is by all accounts a success, but she still deals with condescension from men at dinner parties. The 65-year-old Steel took to her blog to write a post, "Are you still a Brain Surgeon?" where she details her experiences with men who belittle her writing career, and those of her female entrepreneur friend. According to Steel, the situation happens this way: She will run into a man that she hasn't seen for awhile. He will immediately ask, "So, are you still writing?"
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NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Ellen Olivier
Considering that the snow continued in Paris on Monday, the Dior collection came as a welcome preview of spring-summer 2013. Like Dorothy going from gray Kansas to Technicolor Munchkinland, guests slogged through the Jardin des Tuileries, layered in slush, to find themselves inside a tree-filled pavilion alive with greenery. Under the circumstances, traveling to Paris may have delayed some, but for Danielle Steel, getting to the couture shows presented no problem. "I live in Paris," said the former San Francisco resident, arguably among the most popular authors alive today.
IMAGE
July 13, 2013 | Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Novelist Danielle Steel, 65, had a passion for fashion even before she got her hands on her first Hermes Kelly bag, a gift from her grandmother, at age 17. A regular on the bestseller list, with more than 600 million books sold since her first title published in 1972, Steel is adept at documenting the lifestyles of the rich and famous, perhaps because she has always had a front row seat. She grew up between New York and Europe, is a fixture on the San Francisco social scene and a regular at the Paris haute couture shows.
BOOKS
July 24, 1994 | Leila Cobo-Hanlon
Releasing a novel by a best-selling author simultaneously in both English and Spanish is not a common publishing occurrence in the U.S. It's unprecedented, as a matter of fact. And when the author turns out to be no less than Danielle Steel, one would imagine that a frenzy of marketing and strategy would have preceded this groundbreaking event. As it turns out, not really.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | CLIFF EDWARDS, Associated Press
Nancy Eisenbarth waits eagerly to read every one of Danielle Steel's novels, but she's more than a fan--her research provides believable backdrops for the steamy melodramas. The friends' working relationship began over lunch in San Francisco, when Steel was fretting over factual details in "The Ring." It was her first hard-cover book, published in 1980, and chronicled three generations of women. "I offered to look some things up, and we went on from there," said Eisenbarth.
BOOKS
August 31, 1986 | Meredith Babeaux Brucker
They don't call these soapies in the book business for nothing. The formula consists of placing good characters in an interesting situation, and then repetitiously examining every facet of that situation at a TV-soap-opera pace. Here the repetition is carried to new heights. On one page: "It was a side of her he had never seen," then, "It was a side of her he had never seen before." On another page: "He was a little drunk," then, "He was more than a little drunk."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY
For viewers who don't like watching big men spitting on the ground and scratching themselves, even if they're in nice uniforms pressed for the World Series, NBC is counterprogramming this week with five hours of Danielle Steel stories. This is mostly for the womenfolk, since Steel, a high-volume Guinness writer (at least one book on the New York Times bestseller list for 381 consecutive weeks!), wallows in female fantasies.
NEWS
January 6, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
How could she be real? First there's that name, Danielle Steel. Romantic, alluring--it's sure to be an inspired invention. Then there's the sheer volume of work--23 books in 15 years. And the scope of subject matter--historical sagas and contemporary dramas, characters ranging from heiresses and alcoholics to ex-convicts and cowboys. No doubt they're all produced by a stable of writers toiling thanklessly in a basement somewhere in Brooklyn.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Think of the worst-case scenario, Ethan Canin's editor at Houghton Mifflin advised him shortly before his first book, "Emperor of the Air," came out this spring. That was easy. What if nobody read it? What if the 27-year-old author's literary debut came and went unnoticed? As for the best-case scenario, editor Signey Warner Watson urged the fourth-year Harvard medical student not to think about anything as far-fetched as the best-seller list. "It's common knowledge in the industry," Watson said.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Ellen Olivier
Considering that the snow continued in Paris on Monday, the Dior collection came as a welcome preview of spring-summer 2013. Like Dorothy going from gray Kansas to Technicolor Munchkinland, guests slogged through the Jardin des Tuileries, layered in slush, to find themselves inside a tree-filled pavilion alive with greenery. Under the circumstances, traveling to Paris may have delayed some, but for Danielle Steel, getting to the couture shows presented no problem. "I live in Paris," said the former San Francisco resident, arguably among the most popular authors alive today.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2010
Also: Comedy Central signs Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert to new deals. Steel's crime story Danielle Steel's former assistant was sentenced in San Francisco on Tuesday to nearly three years in prison for embezzling almost $1 million from the romance novelist. Kristy Watts worked for 15 years and earned an annual salary of $200,000 for part-time work that included handling Steel's payroll and accounting. The 48-year-old wife of a San Francisco police officer pleaded guilty last year to depositing numerous checks made out to "cash" in her own bank account, using the author's credit card rewards points and paying herself more than her salary.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2008 | Associated Press
After dozens of bestselling novels, Danielle Steel still has words to spare: She's starting a blog. "It's like a letter to a friend, and fun to be able share something and say, 'Gee, I did this,' " says Steel, 61, whose run of hits includes three this year alone: "Honor Thyself," "Rogue" and "A Good Woman." "I've remained very remote and very private, partly because of all my kids [nine]. They're bigger now and I would like to communicate with my readers in a more informal way, not just through the list of my accomplishments on my publisher's Website."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2008 | Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- It's only 9:33 a.m., but already Danielle Steel is having a lousy morning. She's in a Rockefeller Plaza dressing room, having her hair tugged and her makeup tweaked. She's endured questioning from Matt Lauer on the "Today" show and soon faces a second round with Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb. Crowding around are fashionably dressed publicists, agents with noisy cellphones, burly camera operators and various preening hangers-on.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2002 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romance novelist Danielle Steel is a woman of excess. She's dashed off dozens of bestsellers, married five times, produced nine children and inhabits a sprawling compound that commands sweeping views of Alcatraz Island and the Golden Gate Bridge. It turns out she has an appetite for parking places too. The 54-year-old grande dame of fiction has amassed 26 residential permits in her tony Pacific Heights neighborhood--more than any San Franciscan, city officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1999 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every morning at the beginning of chemistry class, Tammy Nabati buries herself in a thick Danielle Steel novel. At some schools, that might land Tammy in the dean's office. But not at Taft High School in Woodland Hills. Tammy is supposed to be reading Danielle Steel--or any other novel during class. In fact, all 2,908 students and 128 staffers on campus are supposed to spend 15 minutes reading at the start of third period each day.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2008 | Associated Press
After dozens of bestselling novels, Danielle Steel still has words to spare: She's starting a blog. "It's like a letter to a friend, and fun to be able share something and say, 'Gee, I did this,' " says Steel, 61, whose run of hits includes three this year alone: "Honor Thyself," "Rogue" and "A Good Woman." "I've remained very remote and very private, partly because of all my kids [nine]. They're bigger now and I would like to communicate with my readers in a more informal way, not just through the list of my accomplishments on my publisher's Website."
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | Associated Press
It will take a month before it is known whether a drug overdose caused the death of Danielle Steel's 19-year-old son, a deputy coroner said Sunday. Nicholas John Steel Traina, who headed a punk band, was found dead Saturday morning at a home he shared with several other people in Pleasant Hill, northeast of San Francisco. Traina was dead when officers arrived at the home, Contra Costa County Deputy Coroner Skip Eriksen said.
BOOKS
July 24, 1994 | Leila Cobo-Hanlon
Releasing a novel by a best-selling author simultaneously in both English and Spanish is not a common publishing occurrence in the U.S. It's unprecedented, as a matter of fact. And when the author turns out to be no less than Danielle Steel, one would imagine that a frenzy of marketing and strategy would have preceded this groundbreaking event. As it turns out, not really.
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