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Darfur Sudan

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WORLD
February 4, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
As rebels in Chad fought for a second day to take control of the nation's capital, analysts said Sunday that the outcome of the attempted coup could have far-reaching implications for the Darfur conflict in neighboring Sudan.
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WORLD
October 20, 2009 | Paul Richter
The White House on Monday unveiled a Sudan policy that seeks a middle ground between punishing the country for its actions in Darfur and appeasing it, a step away from the get-tough policy advocated by President Obama during his election campaign. The announcement of the new policy came after seven months of debate within the administration. It was cautiously welcomed by advocates of stringent measures to end the violence in Darfur, who expressed relief that the White House did not adopt a more conciliatory approach.
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WORLD
October 1, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Armed men killed at least 10 African Union soldiers and seriously wounded seven others in the deadliest strike against peacekeeping troops in Darfur since they deployed in 2004. A faction of Darfur rebels was believed responsible for the assault, which began shortly after sunset Saturday. Rebel groups had been fighting Sudanese government troops nearby in recent days. But AU officials said they could not comment on the suspected identity of the gunmen until a formal investigation was concluded.
WORLD
March 25, 2009 | Associated Press
More than a million people in Darfur will not get their food rations starting in May if Sudan and the United Nations can't fill gaps left by the expulsion of more than a dozen foreign aid groups, a joint U.N.-Sudanese assessment team said Tuesday. Even if other relief organizations in the region help, those are "Band-Aid solutions, not long-term solutions," said John Holmes, the U.N.'s top humanitarian official.
WORLD
September 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
The United Nations high commissioner for refugees proposed autonomy for the troubled Darfur region of Sudan -- a solution the government has resisted but said Friday it was willing to discuss in an effort to end violence that has killed an estimated 50,000 people. "There has to be some clear partition of power in Darfur," Commissioner Ruud Lubbers said in Chad, whose eastern territory borders Darfur.
WORLD
June 11, 2007 | Greg Miller and Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writers
Sudan has secretly worked with the CIA to spy on the insurgency in Iraq, an example of how the U.S. has continued to cooperate with the Sudanese regime even while condemning its suspected role in the killing of tens of thousands of civilians in Darfur. President Bush has denounced the killings in Sudan's western region as genocide and has imposed sanctions on the government in Khartoum.
WORLD
October 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
The African Union on Saturday accused Sudanese government forces of attacking civilians in the country's Darfur region and committing acts of "calculated and wanton destruction" that have killed at least 44 people and displaced thousands over two weeks.
WORLD
February 28, 2007 | Maggie Farley and Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writers
A top Sudanese government official colluded with militias to commit atrocities against civilians in the Darfur region, the International Criminal Court's chief prosecutor said Tuesday.
WORLD
August 26, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Something remarkable happened this year at a clinic for malnourished infants in this West Darfur village: It ran out of patients. And physicians at the Doctors Without Borders clinic haven't seen a single gunshot wound since last year. Now they're thinking about closing down because there is a hospital next door run by another aid agency, and a third center is under construction. "It's getting a bit crowded here," said Sewnet Mekonnen, the clinic's field coordinator.
WORLD
May 12, 2005 | Doyle McManus, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration has offered Air Force transport planes and crews to airlift thousands of additional African peacekeeping troops into Sudan's war-torn Darfur region this summer, State Department officials say. The airlift proposal is part of a larger effort, including at least $50 million in U.S.
WORLD
March 14, 2009 | Associated Press
Three foreign staff members of Doctors Without Borders were freed two days after they were abducted in Sudan's troubled Darfur region, the Italian Foreign Ministry said Friday. An official of the aid organization's Belgian branch, for which the three work, Erwin Van't Land, also said the group had been told by the kidnappers and by Sudanese authorities that the abductees had been released. "But we have not been able to talk to them ourselves. We need our own independent confirmation," he said.
WORLD
October 26, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Sanders is a Times staff writer.
He's accused of torturing enemies, cozying up to Osama bin Laden in the 1990s and plotting to assassinate Egypt's president. But presidential advisor Nafie Ali Nafie says his moderation and pragmatism won him his latest assignment: overseeing the Sudanese government's response to the conflict in Darfur. "I was picked for this because I'm a mild person," said Nafie, maintaining a wary smile and unflappable demeanor throughout an 80-minute interview in his office here.
WORLD
September 25, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
This overcrowded Darfur displacement camp is preparing for battle. Men have dug trenches and dragged tree trunks across dirt roads. Young lookouts, some armed with sticks and axes, scan the horizon for invaders. Even aid workers and United Nations peacekeepers are increasingly wary of Kalma's besieged and, at times, belligerent population.
WORLD
June 25, 2008 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
When Jan Eliasson agreed to be a U.N. envoy to Darfur, he believed peace for the beleaguered region of Sudan was within reach. But after 18 months of shuttle diplomacy, rebel groups are more fractured and violent than ever and the Sudanese government is again engaged in brutal attacks on villages, he told the Security Council on Tuesday. The chance for peace has slipped away for now, he told the council "with much regret," and the focus must revert to restoring security.
WORLD
May 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of men on horseback armed with machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades ambushed Nigerian peacekeepers serving with the U.N.-African Union force in Darfur. No casualties were reported, but the attackers stole rifles, ammunition, telephones and cash. The U.N. peacekeeping chief warned last week of an alarming increase in violence.
SPORTS
April 11, 2008 | From the Associated Press
BEIJING -- Crisis. Disarray. Sadness. Four months before the opening of what was supposed to be the grandest Olympics in history, the head of the International Olympic Committee was using words Thursday that convey anything but a sense of joyous enthusiasm.
WORLD
September 20, 2007 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Here on the territorial edge of one of the world's most intractable crises, U.N. peacemaker Jan Eliasson looks a gray-bearded tribal leader in the eye and tells him that there are moments in history that can make the difference between peace and more war. Talks are taking place aimed at solving the conflict in the Darfur region of Sudan, and the elder, called the makhtoum of Nyala, needs to persuade a rebel leader from his tribe to join in, Eliasson says.
WORLD
June 28, 2004 | Robyn Dixon and Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writers
Humanitarian aid agencies, analysts and U.S. officials all agree that no matter what the international community does to try to prevent the catastrophe unfolding in Darfur, western Sudan, it's too late: Huge numbers of people will die there in coming months. With the U.S. Agency for International Development conservatively predicting that 320,000 people will perish from disease and starvation in the Darfur region, U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and U.N.
WORLD
April 7, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Census-takers will soon fan out across Sudan's vast and famously inhospitable terrain in the first nationwide head count in 25 years. But the checklist of questions won't include two hot issues that lie at the heart of this nation's recent history of conflict: religion and ethnicity. The government, led by President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir, has decided not to tally numbers for Muslims, Christians and other faiths, nor will it gather data about tribe or ethnic origin.
WORLD
March 29, 2008 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. is offering to gradually normalize relations with Sudan if the government in Khartoum settles issues such as the Darfur crisis and carries out elections next year, U.S. and Sudanese diplomats said Friday. Sudan would have to remove obstacles to the deployment of a U.N.-led peacekeeping force, stop violence against civilians in Darfur, release U.S.
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