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Dark Ages

ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1993 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Patricia Ward Biederman is a Times staff writer
The Middle Ages: A great place to visit but you wouldn't want to live there. Translated into Latin, that could be the motto of a series of movies dealing with medieval times that starts Thursday at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu. From the Technicolor swashbuckler "Ivanhoe" to Bunuel's "Simon of the Desert," the movies take us back to a time when no Christian doubted that life continued after death and a woman overly fond of her black cats might find herself crackling at the stake.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2006 | William Lobdell, Times Staff Writer
LIKE a favorite college professor who could make any subject fascinating and understandable, Thomas Cahill takes us on an intoxicating journey through medieval Europe in "Mysteries of the Middle Ages: The Rise of Feminism, Science, and Art From the Cults of Catholic Europe."
OPINION
March 25, 1990 | Gianni De Michelis, Gianni De Michelis, foreign minister of Italy, becomes chairman of the Council of Foreign Ministers of the European Community in July. An expanded version of this article will appear in the spring issue of New Perspectives Quarterly
How is it that, in the span of a mere decade, Europe has made the transition from Eurosclerosis to Europhoria? I believe Europe has entered the ascendant phase of a new Kondratieff Cycle--the more or less 50-year generational cycle of change in which technological and political innovation overcomes stagnation and generates a new economic boom. The new momentum began with a decision among the key European powers to integrate by 1992.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Four or five days a week throughout the spring, summer and fall, Ted L. Brown laces up his steel-toed Red Wing boots, plants a wide-brimmed canvas hat on his head and hits the road. He roams the rugged mountains and mesas of rural northern New Mexico, interviewing residents and looking for fleas. It's hot, dirty and potentially dangerous, but he loves his job. In late 20th-Century America, Brown tracks plague for a living.
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This story was written on a computer by candlelight. It was researched in an urban war zone where tanks routinely collided with buses, where rockets disemboweled bulls, where the gunfire of celebration ripped through the skulls of children and where rival armies changed the city map each night. It was also a climate in which journalists had to be as good at scavenging as they were at reporting the daily onslaught of bullets, grenades and tank fire, and an all-consuming chaos.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | NANCY SHULINS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Susan Lacey's deepening depression began casting its shadow over her husband and teen-age son late last summer. But her 9-year-old daughter, whose artistic personality so resembled her own, had been affected the most. "I kept trying to reassure her," Susan said. "Yet by October, I was no longer sure, and I couldn't lie to her. I've never lied to her. "And I finally found myself saying to my husband, 'I can't tell her anymore that things are going to be OK.'
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A wise guy in both senses of the phrase, the late Ernst Pawel admits in this memoir of his first 30 years that "even as a very small child . . . most grown-ups struck me as dim-witted, crude and devoid of imagination, an opinion I [later] saw no reason to change." Pawel is known for his biographies of Franz Kafka ("The Nightmare of Reason") and of Zionist leader Theodore Herzl ("The Labyrinth of Exile").
OPINION
April 24, 2012
Over the last 10 years, California's juvenile justice system has begun to emerge from the darkest of its dark days. In settling lawsuits, the state agreed to turn away from inhumane practices and reduce youth prison violence, abide by laws that require educational and mental health and healthcare services, and provide access for the physically disabled. The state was caught physically abusing its wards, sometimes by looking the other way when fights broke out, sometimes by spurring the fights on, sometimes by guards actually beating the wards.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By John Lopez
"What it means to be an artist today -- where do we start on that one?" muses Ed Ruscha, almost nonplused. Finally, the soft-spoken art veteran decides : "It means facing a lot of information that's going to be very difficult to take in and swallow because there's so much of it." Once the ramifications settle in, he slyly drawls, "to grasp the total picture would make you wish you could go back to 1960 when things were a bit slower, almost like the Dark Ages." That dizziness finds a counterpoint with fledgling film director Michael Mohan on a cold December night in Westwood.
OPINION
June 30, 1991
In view of their concerns about the lack of safety in the use of RU-486, perhaps Wanda Frantz and the National Right to Life Committee would like to propose a ban on wire coat hangers as well (June 20). This country does not need a return to the Dark Ages of women's health care. HELEN V. OGDEN, Manhattan Beach
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