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Darlene Love

ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"We're back! We're bad! You're black! I'm mad!" That's the kind of dialogue we get in the new car-crash, heavy-artillery thriller, "Lethal Weapon 2" (citywide). And, if it suggests a movie poster catch-phrase instead of human speech, it's probably intentional. In 1987's "Lethal Weapon," a quasi-suicidal cop named Martin Riggs, who didn't care if he lived or died, was partnered with a steady, cautious black family man, Roger Murtaugh.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2001 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do the Jelly Beans' "I Wanna Love Him So Bad," The Raindrops' "What a Guy," Lesley Gore's "Look of Love" and Darlene Love's "(Today I Met) the Boy I'm Gonna Marry" have in common? The '60s hits all are featured-- with many better-remembered songs--in "Leader of the Pack," a musical playing through this weekend at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza and featuring current members of the rock 'n' roll revival band Sha Na Na.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When he was a kid in the 1960s, Jerry Mitchell visited the Hollywood Bowl for the first time. "We got to walk on the stage," he recalls. "I looked out and said, 'This is amazing. This is what I want to do.'" Mitchell is back at the Bowl, where he will direct and choreograph a new version of "Hairspray," the Broadway hit based on John Waters' film about an effervescent teen who uses a TV dance program to battle segregation in '60s Baltimore. The show, which runs Friday through Sunday, stars Harvey Fierstein and Marissa Jaret Winokur — re-creating their Tony-winning roles as Edna Turnblad and her daughter, Tracy — plus Susan Anton, Corbin Bleu, Drew Carey, Nick Jonas, Darlene Love and John Stamos.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | PAUL GREIN
Rosemary Clooney couldn't have chosen a more appropriate song to close the fourth annual Singers' Salute to the Songwriter on Tuesday night--Jerome Kern's "Look for the Silver Lining." It was in an effort to do something constructive after her sister Betty's death of a brain injury 11 years ago that Clooney came up with the idea of the salute. This year's event at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion raised nearly $500,000 for the Betty Clooney Foundation for Persons with Brain Injury and its offspring, the Betty Clooney Center in Long Beach.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2012 | By Tina Susman
Three hours before Whitney Houston's funeral was to begin Saturday, about three dozen fans gathered at a corner four blocks up the street from the New Hope Baptist Church, the closest police permitted them to be. Catherine Graham Ross peered through a pair of opera glasses toward the church at the flashing lights of police cars, past metal barricades and yellow police ropes, and said she understood the need to keep people back. "They're hurting and they need their time," she said, referring to Houston's family.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
In stark contrast to the recent trend in which any number of producers are enlisted by a hit artist for a new album, the "Dick Tracy" song soundtrack album instead has one producer riding herd over a daunting diversity of name performers. The range of voices includes k.d lang, Erasure, Brenda Lee, Ice-T, Tommy Page, Darlene Love, Al Jarreau and Jerry Lee Lewis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Jimmy O'Neill, an Oklahoman barely out of his teens when he became Los Angeles' top-rated radio deejay and only 24 when he catapulted to national celebrity as the host of "Shindig!," one of the earliest rock 'n' roll shows on prime-time television, died Friday at his West Hollywood home. He was 73. He had diabetes and heart problems, said his son, James O'Neill. In 1959, O'Neill made radio history as the first voice heard on KRLA-AM (1110) when it dropped its country-western format for rock music.
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